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17.433 International Relations of East Asia (MIT) 17.433 International Relations of East Asia (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce and analyze the international relations of East Asia. With four great powers, three nuclear weapons states, and two of the world's largest economies, East Asia is one of the most dynamic and consequential regions in world politics. This course will examine the sources of conflict and cooperation in both periods, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia's international relations. Readings will be drawn from international relations theory, political science and history. The aim of this course is to introduce and analyze the international relations of East Asia. With four great powers, three nuclear weapons states, and two of the world's largest economies, East Asia is one of the most dynamic and consequential regions in world politics. This course will examine the sources of conflict and cooperation in both periods, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia's international relations. Readings will be drawn from international relations theory, political science and history.

Subjects

International relations | International relations | East Asia | East Asia | great powers | great powers | nuclear weapons states | nuclear weapons states | largest economies | largest economies | world politics | world politics | Cold War | Cold War | competition | competition | conflict superpowers | conflict superpowers | post-Cold War era | post-Cold War era | global economy | global economy | balance | balance | power | power | cooperation | cooperation | theory | theory | political science | political science | history | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.211 The United States in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the unique culture that developed in the United States after World War II. The dawn of the nuclear age and the ensuing Cold War fundamentally altered American politics and social life. It also led to a flowering of technological experimentation and rapid innovation in the sciences. Over the course of the term, students will explore how Americans responded to these changes, and how those responses continue to shape life in the US today.

Subjects

nuclear age | Cold War America | atom bomb | bomb | atomic age | nuclear energy | civil defense | domestic containment | New Deal | McCarthysim | Red Scare | sex | gender | lavender scare | homosexual | technology | MIT | security | space | race | suburbanization | white flight | urban crisis | China's Cold War | Cold War civil rights | youth culture | mass culture | student movement | New Left | anti-nuclear movement | democracy | nuclear weapon

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad? This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy | WWI | WWI | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future (MIT) 17.951 Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future (MIT)

Description

This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear force structures and model nuclear exchanges. The last six weeks of the course will look at theories and cases of nuclear decision making beyond the original five weapon states, and will look particularly at why states pursue or forego nuclear weapons, the role that individuals and institutions play, This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear force structures and model nuclear exchanges. The last six weeks of the course will look at theories and cases of nuclear decision making beyond the original five weapon states, and will look particularly at why states pursue or forego nuclear weapons, the role that individuals and institutions play,

Subjects

nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | war | war | politics | politics | World War II | World War II | Soviet Union | Soviet Union | Cold War | Cold War | Great Britain | Great Britain | France | France | China | China | India | India | Israel | Israel | Pakistan | Pakistan | North Korea | North Korea | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear disarmament | nuclear disarmament | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT) 17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT)

Description

This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory. This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory.

Subjects

China | China | chinese | chinese | foreign | foreign | policy | policy | international relations | international relations | People?s Republic of China | People?s Republic of China | foreign relations | foreign relations | Cold War | Cold War | contemporary | contemporary | diplomatic | diplomatic | security | security | economic | economic | 1949 | 1949 | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | behavior | behavior | competing explanations | competing explanations | key events | key events | political science | political science | history | history | international relations theory | international relations theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | engineering | engineering | hobbyist | hobbyist | communications | communications | Internet | Internet | machine age | machine age | Apollo program | Apollo program | biotechnology | biotechnology | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Transatlantic security relations Transatlantic security relations

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As As taught Autumn Semester 2010. The module will investigate some of the key issues that have characterised transatlantic security cooperation since 1990. The module will focus on issues that relate to the security of the European continent as well as to matters of global concern. Educational Aims This module aims to: Give students an understanding of the development in US-European security relations since 1990. An awareness of the post-Cold War debates surrounding security issues both inside and outside of Europe. Develop a subject specific knowledge of transatlantic security relations. Encourage students to read widely in the literature on transatlantic relations. Enable students to critically This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As As taught Autumn Semester 2010. The module will investigate some of the key issues that have characterised transatlantic security cooperation since 1990. The module will focus on issues that relate to the security of the European continent as well as to matters of global concern. Educational Aims This module aims to: Give students an understanding of the development in US-European security relations since 1990. An awareness of the post-Cold War debates surrounding security issues both inside and outside of Europe. Develop a subject specific knowledge of transatlantic security relations. Encourage students to read widely in the literature on transatlantic relations. Enable students to critically

Subjects

UNow | UNow | transatlantic security cooperation | transatlantic security cooperation | US-European security relations | US-European security relations | post-Cold War debates | post-Cold War debates | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code:M13018 | Module Code:M13018 | The Transformation of NATO | The Transformation of NATO | Developing a European Defence Identity | Developing a European Defence Identity | Transatlantic Cooperation in the ‘War Against Terrorism’ | Transatlantic Cooperation in the ‘War Against Terrorism’ | Nuclear Proliferation and Counter-Proliferation: North Korea | Nuclear Proliferation and Counter-Proliferation: North Korea | ‘States of Concern’ | ‘States of Concern’

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT) 17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power. This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subjects

military intervention | military intervention | post Cold War | post Cold War | internal conflict | internal conflict | Kurds | Kurds | Iraq | Iraq | Somalia | Somalia | Bosnia | Bosnia | Serbia | Serbia | Kosovo | Kosovo | Libya | Libya | Rwanda | Rwanda | Darfur | Darfur | Sudan | Sudan | United States | United States | civil war | civil war | political strategies | political strategies | failing states | failing states | foreign policy | foreign policy | NATO | NATO | genocide | genocide | refugee | refugee | sanctions | sanctions | political reconstruction | political reconstruction | peacekeeping | peacekeeping | humanitarian intervention | humanitarian intervention | the Balkans | the Balkans | Gaddafi | Gaddafi | preventive diplomacy | preventive diplomacy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT) 21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world. This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | world | history | history | 1492 | 1492 | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | political | political | social | social | revolution | revolution | industrialization | industrialization | consumer society | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | Columbus | New World | New World | racism | racism | slavery | slavery | Ottoman Empire | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | French revolution | human rights | human rights | Haiti | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Das Capital | Africa | Africa | Opium Wars | Opium Wars | Far East | Far East | Communism | Communism | Cold War | Cold War | globalization | globalization | French revolution | human rights | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Jonathan Wright responds to Jonathan Maynard’s Questions on Mental Maps Jonathan Wright responds to Jonathan Maynard’s Questions on Mental Maps

Description

This review of Mental Maps in the Era of Détente and the End of the Cold War 1968-1991 is as much sweeping as it is detailed. Jonathan Wright highlights the main arguments each contributor has made to this edited volume dedicated to the thinking that prevailed during the closing decades of the Cold War. How did world leaders think? How did their thinking change and how did this impact the course of the Cold War? On behalf of his co-editor Steven Casey, as well as of each contributing author, Jonathan Wright makes the case that, “The great crises of the twentieth century sometimes allowed leaders even with very different ideologies to find something in common, a shared orientation in their mental maps.” The post Jonathan Wright responds to Jonathan Maynard’s Questions on Mental Maps This review of Mental Maps in the Era of Détente and the End of the Cold War 1968-1991 is as much sweeping as it is detailed. Jonathan Wright highlights the main arguments each contributor has made to this edited volume dedicated to the thinking that prevailed during the closing decades of the Cold War. How did world leaders think? How did their thinking change and how did this impact the course of the Cold War? On behalf of his co-editor Steven Casey, as well as of each contributing author, Jonathan Wright makes the case that, “The great crises of the twentieth century sometimes allowed leaders even with very different ideologies to find something in common, a shared orientation in their mental maps.” The post Jonathan Wright responds to Jonathan Maynard’s Questions on Mental Maps

Subjects

Book Reviews | Book Reviews | Cold War | Cold War | International History | International History | Political Leadership | Political Leadership | Political Thought | Political Thought

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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17.473 The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation: Nuclear History, Strategy, and Statecraft (MIT) 17.473 The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation: Nuclear History, Strategy, and Statecraft (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. It introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. It also examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences. This course provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. It introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. It also examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences.

Subjects

nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | strategy | strategy | statecraft | statecraft | world politics | world politics | global community | global community | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | foreign policy | foreign policy | international relations | international relations | rogue states | rogue states | non-state | non-state | deterrence | deterrence | containment | containment | atomic age | atomic age | bomb scare | bomb scare | Second World War | Second World War | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project | Hiroshima | Hiroshima | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear age | nuclear age | nonproliferation | nonproliferation | early Cold War | early Cold War | the Berlin Crisis | the Berlin Crisis | the Cuban Missile Crisis | the Cuban Missile Crisis | Detente | Detente | nuclear arms control | nuclear arms control | nuclear balance | nuclear balance | Euromissile Crisis | Euromissile Crisis | Nuclear Suppliers Group | Nuclear Suppliers Group | parity | parity | Dr. Strangelove | Dr. Strangelove | terrorism | terrorism | global zero | global zero | U.S. policy | U.S. policy | national security | national security | nucelar dynamics | nucelar dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.433 International Relations of East Asia (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce and analyze the international relations of East Asia. With four great powers, three nuclear weapons states, and two of the world's largest economies, East Asia is one of the most dynamic and consequential regions in world politics. This course will examine the sources of conflict and cooperation in both periods, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia's international relations. Readings will be drawn from international relations theory, political science and history.

Subjects

International relations | East Asia | great powers | nuclear weapons states | largest economies | world politics | Cold War | competition | conflict superpowers | post-Cold War era | global economy | balance | power | cooperation | theory | political science | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | history | 1492 | colonialism | imperialism | political | social | revolution | industrialization | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | New World | racism | slavery | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | human rights | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Africa | Opium Wars | Far East | Communism | Cold War | globalization | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | engineering | hobbyist | communications | Internet | machine age | Apollo program | biotechnology | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | history | 1492 | colonialism | imperialism | political | social | revolution | industrialization | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | New World | racism | slavery | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | human rights | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Africa | Opium Wars | Far East | Communism | Cold War | globalization | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | rural society | agrarian society | artisan society | industrial society | power | industrial capitalism | factory system | transport | communication | industrial corporation | social relations | production | science-based industry | technology | innovation | process | social criteria | American history | America | technologies | democratic process | political | politics | social | progress | United States | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | engineering | hobbyist | communications | Internet | machine age | Apollo program | biotechnology | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.473 The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation: Nuclear History, Strategy, and Statecraft (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. It introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. It also examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences.

Subjects

nuclear proliferation | strategy | statecraft | world politics | global community | nuclear weapons | foreign policy | international relations | rogue states | non-state | deterrence | containment | atomic age | bomb scare | Second World War | Manhattan Project | Hiroshima | nuclear power | nuclear age | nonproliferation | early Cold War | the Berlin Crisis | the Cuban Missile Crisis | Detente | nuclear arms control | nuclear balance | Euromissile Crisis | Nuclear Suppliers Group | parity | Dr. Strangelove | terrorism | global zero | U.S. policy | national security | nucelar dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subjects

military intervention | post Cold War | internal conflict | Kurds | Iraq | Somalia | Bosnia | Serbia | Kosovo | Libya | Rwanda | Darfur | Sudan | United States | civil war | political strategies | failing states | foreign policy | NATO | genocide | refugee | sanctions | political reconstruction | peacekeeping | humanitarian intervention | the Balkans | Gaddafi | preventive diplomacy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy | WWI | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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