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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT) 21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world. This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | world | history | history | 1492 | 1492 | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | political | political | social | social | revolution | revolution | industrialization | industrialization | consumer society | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | Columbus | New World | New World | racism | racism | slavery | slavery | Ottoman Empire | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | French revolution | human rights | human rights | Haiti | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Das Capital | Africa | Africa | Opium Wars | Opium Wars | Far East | Far East | Communism | Communism | Cold War | Cold War | globalization | globalization | French revolution | human rights | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT) 21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers. 21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | insurgents | war | war | freedom fighters | freedom fighters | independence | independence | self-determination | self-determination | emancipation | emancipation | revolution | revolution | Mao | Mao | Lenin | Lenin | Reagan | Reagan | L'Ouverture | L'Ouverture | reactionary | reactionary | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | democracy | democracy | populism | populism | Communism | Communism | equality | equality | nationalism | nationalism | resistance | resistance | ideology | ideology | subversion | subversion | underground | underground | suppression | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | war | freedom fighters | independence | self-determination | emancipation | revolution | Mao | Lenin | Reagan | L'Ouverture | reactionary | imperialism | human rights | democracy | populism | Communism | equality | nationalism | resistance | ideology | subversion | underground | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | history | 1492 | colonialism | imperialism | political | social | revolution | industrialization | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | New World | racism | slavery | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | human rights | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Africa | Opium Wars | Far East | Communism | Cold War | globalization | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | history | 1492 | colonialism | imperialism | political | social | revolution | industrialization | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | New World | racism | slavery | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | human rights | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Africa | Opium Wars | Far East | Communism | Cold War | globalization | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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21H.245J Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, 1917 to the Present (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and historical evolution of the Soviet state and society from the 1917 Revolution to the present. It covers the creation of a revolutionary regime, causes and nature of the Stalin revolution, post-Stalinist efforts to achieve political and social reform, and causes of the Soviet collapse. It also examines current developments in Russia in light of Soviet history.

Subjects

21H.245 | 17.57 | 21G.086 | Soviet Union | politics | society | Vladimir Putin | Imperial Russia | Russian Revolution | New Economic Policy | Gorbachev | Yeltsin | Lenin | Pobedonostsev | Marxism | October Manifesto | World War I | February Revolution | Romanov dynasty | Bolsheviks | Trotsky | October Revolution | Civil War | Red Army | Communism | Stalin | collectivization | industrialization | Gulag | Molotov-Ribbentrop pact | World War II | Novikov telegram | Khrushchev | Brezhnev | Alena Ledeneva | Putin | Kremlin | Medvedev | Ukraine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | war | freedom fighters | independence | self-determination | emancipation | revolution | Mao | Lenin | Reagan | L'Ouverture | reactionary | imperialism | human rights | democracy | populism | Communism | equality | nationalism | resistance | ideology | subversion | underground | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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