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17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT) 17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects. This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects.

Subjects

evaluation of public policies | evaluation of public policies | political process | political process | public policy | public policy | Congressional behavior | Congressional behavior | Congress | Congress | voting behavior | voting behavior | public opinion surveys | public opinion surveys | statistics | statistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT) 17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects. This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects.

Subjects

evaluation of public policies | evaluation of public policies | political process | political process | public policy | public policy | Congressional behavior | Congressional behavior | Congress | Congress | voting behavior | voting behavior | public opinion surveys | public opinion surveys | statistics | statistics | Political science | Political science | quantitative tools | quantitative tools | research | research | social science | social science | empirical questions | empirical questions | STATA | STATA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects.

Subjects

evaluation of public policies | political process | public policy | Congressional behavior | Congress | voting behavior | public opinion surveys | statistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT) 17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics. This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics.

Subjects

American politics | American politics | The Constitution | The Constitution | politicians | politicians | Congress | Congress | the Presidency | the Presidency | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | judiciary | judiciary | federalism | federalism | public opinion | public opinion | political parties | political parties | partisanship | partisanship | choice | choice | campaigns | campaigns | elections | elections | policy | policy | political geography | political geography | polarization | polarization | extremism | extremism | organized interests | organized interests | economic inequality | economic inequality | race | race | immigration | immigration | multiculturalism | multiculturalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DP4C34 History A: Introducing Topics within a Historical Period

Description

This Unit is designed to meet the needs of candidates undertaking the HN Social Science History A course. It will examine a variety of historical topics in Europe in the late 18th and 19th centuries. It will use two particular approaches to enable you to gain an understanding of the major events during this time by: • examining social, political, economic and cultural changes throughout the period. • using a variety of sources that contain different viewpoints about these changes. These approaches will allow you to understand the reasons for change and also place events and views in context. Outcome 1 You will be asked to explain the main developments associated with a specific situation or a particular event or series of events. Outcome 2 You will be asked to describe how the contribu

Subjects

DP4C 34 | Europe in the 18th Century | Causes of the French Revolution | Identity of Europe | Reign of Napoleon | Congress of Vienna | Breakdown of the Congress System | Growth in Socialism | Revolutions of 1848 | German States 1800–1848 | Influence of Napoleon | Reform in Prussia | Otto von Bismarck | Danish War 1864 | D: Humanities (History/Archaeology/Religious Studies/Philosophy) | HUMANITIES (HISTORY / ARCHAEOLOGY / RELIGIOUS STUDIES / PHILOSOPHY) | SCQF Level 7

License

Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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n del curso n del curso

Description

Subjects

a y Documentacin | a y Documentacin | Library of Congress | Library of Congress

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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17.251 Congress and the American Political System I (MIT) 17.251 Congress and the American Political System I (MIT)

Description

Focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization. Considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. Focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization. Considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Congress | Congress | Senate | Senate | House of Representatives | House of Representatives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.931 Development of Inventions and Creative Ideas (MIT) 6.931 Development of Inventions and Creative Ideas (MIT)

Description

This course examines the role of the engineer as patent expert and as technical witness in court and patent interference and related proceedings. It discusses the rights and obligations of engineers in connection with educational institutions, government, and large and small businesses. It compares various manners of transplanting inventions into business operations, including development of New England and other U.S. electronics and biotechnology industries and their different types of institutions. The course also considers American systems of incentive to creativity apart from the patent laws in the atomic energy and space fields. Acknowledgment The instructors would like to thank Joanne Rines and Elijah Ercolino for their efforts in preparing this course. This course examines the role of the engineer as patent expert and as technical witness in court and patent interference and related proceedings. It discusses the rights and obligations of engineers in connection with educational institutions, government, and large and small businesses. It compares various manners of transplanting inventions into business operations, including development of New England and other U.S. electronics and biotechnology industries and their different types of institutions. The course also considers American systems of incentive to creativity apart from the patent laws in the atomic energy and space fields. Acknowledgment The instructors would like to thank Joanne Rines and Elijah Ercolino for their efforts in preparing this course.

Subjects

patents | patents | inventions | inventions | United States | United States | Alexander Graham Bell | Alexander Graham Bell | telephone patent | telephone patent | innovation | innovation | inventors | inventors | rights | rights | law | law | courts | courts | modernization | modernization | ideas | ideas | creativity | creativity | original | original | American Telephone and Telegraph Company | American Telephone and Telegraph Company | Congress | Congress | Constitution | Constitution | Patent Act | Patent Act | Thomas Edison | Thomas Edison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Supreme Court | Congress | Congress | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights | federalism | federalism | separation of powers | separation of powers | supreme court cases | supreme court cases | marbury | marbury | madison | madison | mccullough | mccullough | maryland | maryland | bush | bush | gore | gore | dred scott | dred scott | sanford | sanford | brown | brown | board of education | board of education | equal protection of the laws | equal protection of the laws | immigration | immigration | welfare | welfare | Eighth Amendment | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | poverty | criminal procedure | criminal procedure | World War II | World War II | Korean War | Korean War | post 9/11 america | post 9/11 america | judicial review | judicial review | religion | religion | citizenship | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.202 Graduate Seminar in American Politics II (MIT) 17.202 Graduate Seminar in American Politics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second in a sequence of two field seminars in American politics intended for graduate students in political science, in preparation for taking the general examination in American politics. The material covered in this semester focuses on American political institutions. The readings covered here are not comprehensive, but it is sufficiently broad to give students an introduction to major empirical questions and theoretical approaches that guide the study of American political institutions these days. This is the second in a sequence of two field seminars in American politics intended for graduate students in political science, in preparation for taking the general examination in American politics. The material covered in this semester focuses on American political institutions. The readings covered here are not comprehensive, but it is sufficiently broad to give students an introduction to major empirical questions and theoretical approaches that guide the study of American political institutions these days.

Subjects

American politics | American politics | Congress | Congress | President | President | courts | courts | Bureaucracy | Bureaucracy | political parties | political parties | political interest groups | political interest groups

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT) 17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT)

Description

This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.   This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.  

Subjects

federal and state government | federal and state government | Supreme Court | Supreme Court | constitutional law | constitutional law | judicial review | judicial review | judicial interpretation | judicial interpretation | nation-state relations | nation-state relations | commerce clause | commerce clause | Congress | Congress | taxing and spending power | taxing and spending power | due process | due process | economic liberty | economic liberty | right to privacy | right to privacy | personal liberty | personal liberty | abortion | abortion | racial discrimination | racial discrimination | affirmative action | affirmative action | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | economic discrimination | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | same-sex marriage | same-sex marriage | voting | voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT) 17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public. This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public.

Subjects

United States social policy | United States social policy | U.S. policymaking process | U.S. policymaking process | political institutions | political institutions | policy elites | policy elites | media | media | mass public | mass public | American exceptionalism | American exceptionalism | Congress | Congress | U.S. courts | U.S. courts | representative government and participation | representative government and participation | policy in practice | policy in practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects.

Subjects

evaluation of public policies | political process | public policy | Congressional behavior | Congress | voting behavior | public opinion surveys | statistics | Political science | quantitative tools | research | social science | empirical questions | STATA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.251 Congress and the American Political System I (MIT) 17.251 Congress and the American Political System I (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention has been given to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization in this course. It considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention has been given to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization in this course. It considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Congress | Congress | Senate | Senate | House of Representatives | House of Representatives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public.

Subjects

United States social policy | U.S. policymaking process | political institutions | policy elites | media | mass public | American exceptionalism | Congress | U.S. courts | representative government and participation | policy in practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Governance of the Olympic Games

Description

This resource guide examines the increasing importance of Olympic governance and argues that it is reflected in its visions, structures and operations as well as its relations with global political issues. In spite of this, it suggests that it is still an under-researched area. The bibliography contains a number of sources not necessarily listed in other governance related publications and presents them in three categories: academic texts; reports; and web-based resources.

Subjects

UKOER OER Governance and management | Olympic Charter | Olympic mission | Strategic objectives of Olympic movement | Principles of Olympism | New partnerships | 2009 Olympic Congress.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT)

Description

This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.  

Subjects

federal and state government | Supreme Court | constitutional law | judicial review | judicial interpretation | nation-state relations | commerce clause | Congress | taxing and spending power | due process | economic liberty | right to privacy | personal liberty | abortion | racial discrimination | affirmative action | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | sexual orientation | same-sex marriage | voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics.

Subjects

American politics | The Constitution | politicians | Congress | the Presidency | bureaucracy | judiciary | federalism | public opinion | political parties | partisanship | choice | campaigns | elections | policy | political geography | polarization | extremism | organized interests | economic inequality | race | immigration | multiculturalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.931 Development of Inventions and Creative Ideas (MIT)

Description

This course examines the role of the engineer as patent expert and as technical witness in court and patent interference and related proceedings. It discusses the rights and obligations of engineers in connection with educational institutions, government, and large and small businesses. It compares various manners of transplanting inventions into business operations, including development of New England and other U.S. electronics and biotechnology industries and their different types of institutions. The course also considers American systems of incentive to creativity apart from the patent laws in the atomic energy and space fields. Acknowledgment The instructors would like to thank Joanne Rines and Elijah Ercolino for their efforts in preparing this course.

Subjects

patents | inventions | United States | Alexander Graham Bell | telephone patent | innovation | inventors | rights | law | courts | modernization | ideas | creativity | original | American Telephone and Telegraph Company | Congress | Constitution | Patent Act | Thomas Edison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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National online Trade Union courses at Stow College

Description

This case study gives an overview of a successful national online suite of Trade Union (TU) courses which Stow College have been developing and delivering since 1999. It highlights what factors have influenced decisions in designing successful online learning courses aimed at learners with a range of IT skills; and which have successfully increased student retention on the courses (over 200 students have completed the 13 introductory courses in the last 12 months). It highlights the successful implementation of an introductory eFLearning course which has a positive impact on student retention and achievement rates.

Subjects

2012 | case studies | Stow College | Union Reps | online courses | online learning | Trades Union Congress (TUC) | None

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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17.251 Congress and the American Political System I (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention has been given to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization in this course. It considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Congress | Senate | House of Representatives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.251 Congress and the American Political System I (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention has been given to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization in this course. It considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Congress | Senate | House of Representatives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Congress | constitutional law | racial profiling | wartime | affirmative action | constitutionality | civil rights | civil liberties | roe | wade | economic liberties | desegregation | gender discrimination | gay marriage | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | federalism | separation of powers | supreme court cases | marbury | madison | mccullough | maryland | bush | gore | dred scott | sanford | brown | board of education | equal protection of the laws | immigration | welfare | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | criminal procedure | World War II | Korean War | post 9/11 america | judicial review | religion | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Congress | constitutional law | racial profiling | wartime | affirmative action | constitutionality | civil rights | civil liberties | roe | wade | economic liberties | desegregation | gender discrimination | gay marriage | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | federalism | separation of powers | supreme court cases | marbury | madison | mccullough | maryland | bush | gore | dred scott | sanford | brown | board of education | equal protection of the laws | immigration | welfare | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | criminal procedure | World War II | Korean War | post 9/11 america | judicial review | religion | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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17.251 Congress and the American Political System I (MIT)

Description

Focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization. Considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Congress | Senate | House of Representatives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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