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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402 | plusars | plusars | galaxies | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT) STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine. This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Subjects

Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | science | science | cosmology | cosmology | natural history | natural history | physics | physics | mathematics | mathematics | astronomy | astronomy | medicine | medicine | alchemy | alchemy | technology | technology | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Hippocrates | Hippocrates | Ptolemy | Ptolemy | Euclid | Euclid | Galen | Galen | Vesalius | Vesalius | Copernicus | Copernicus | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | Bacon | Bacon | Descartes | Descartes | Newton | Newton | history | history | culture | culture | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | Latin West | Latin West | western | western | natural science | natural science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.050 Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past: Galileo (MIT) EC.050 Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past: Galileo (MIT)

Description

2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's astonishing sightings of features on the moon, stars, and moons around Jupiter that no one had seen before. Recreate these new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques Galileo had on hand, while you reflect on the times and works of Galileo. What was it like to improvise new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques on hand? What do we notice? What surprises us? How can we relate to past experience and ideas? What are we curious to research? How does our experimenting grow into our learning? Let your own curiosity drive your explorations. 2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's astonishing sightings of features on the moon, stars, and moons around Jupiter that no one had seen before. Recreate these new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques Galileo had on hand, while you reflect on the times and works of Galileo. What was it like to improvise new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques on hand? What do we notice? What surprises us? How can we relate to past experience and ideas? What are we curious to research? How does our experimenting grow into our learning? Let your own curiosity drive your explorations.

Subjects

Galileo | Galileo | vertical fall | vertical fall | terrestrial rotation | terrestrial rotation | secondary qualities | secondary qualities | special injunction | special injunction | star furthest | star furthest | igneous particles | igneous particles | stellar sphere | stellar sphere | Galileo Galilei | Galileo Galilei | Copernican Opinion | Copernican Opinion | The Mathematics of Strength | The Mathematics of Strength | The Parabolic Path of Projectiles | The Parabolic Path of Projectiles | Conservation of Motion | Conservation of Motion | Nicolaus Copernicus | Nicolaus Copernicus | Definition of Uniform Acceleration | Definition of Uniform Acceleration | Italian physicist | Italian physicist | mathematician | mathematician | astronomer | astronomer | philosopher | philosopher | Scientific Revolution | Scientific Revolution | telescope and consequent astronomical observations | telescope and consequent astronomical observations | Copernicanism | Copernicanism | astronomy | astronomy | modern physics | modern physics | father of modern science | father of modern science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.713 Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past: Galileo (MIT)

Description

2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's astonishing sightings of features on the moon, stars, and moons around Jupiter that no one had seen before. Recreate these new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques Galileo had on hand, while you reflect on the times and works of Galileo. What was it like to improvise new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques on hand? What do we notice? What surprises us? How can we relate to past experience and ideas? What are we curious to research? How does our experimenting grow into our learning? Let your own curiosity drive your explorations.

Subjects

Galileo | vertical fall | terrestrial rotation | secondary qualities | special injunction | star furthest | igneous particles | stellar sphere | Galileo Galilei | Copernican Opinion | The Mathematics of Strength | The Parabolic Path of Projectiles | Conservation of Motion | Nicolaus Copernicus | Definition of Uniform Acceleration | Italian physicist | mathematician | astronomer | philosopher | Scientific Revolution | telescope and consequent astronomical observations | Copernicanism | astronomy | modern physics | father of modern science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Subjects

Antiquity | Middle Ages | Renaissance | science | cosmology | natural history | physics | mathematics | astronomy | medicine | alchemy | technology | Plato | Aristotle | Hippocrates | Ptolemy | Euclid | Galen | Vesalius | Copernicus | Kepler | Galileo | Bacon | Descartes | Newton | history | culture | scientific revolution | Latin West | western | natural science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The birth of modern astronomy

Description

Authors:  Emeritus Prof. David Wolfe by Emeritus Professor David Wolfe, University of New Mexico and visiting lecturer, Physics Department, UCT Clicked 123 times. Last clicked 08/28/2014 - 00:51. Teaching & Learning Context:  For anyone interested in learning more about the origins of astronomy.

Subjects

Centre for Higher Education Development | Centre for Open Learning | Audio | Audio Lectures | English | Post-secondary | astronomy | David Wolfe | history | Johannes Kepler | Nicholas Copernicus | Science | Tycho Brahe

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.5/za/

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STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Subjects

Antiquity | Middle Ages | Renaissance | science | cosmology | natural history | physics | mathematics | astronomy | medicine | alchemy | technology | Plato | Aristotle | Hippocrates | Ptolemy | Euclid | Galen | Vesalius | Copernicus | Kepler | Galileo | Bacon | Descartes | Newton | history | culture | scientific revolution | Latin West | western | natural science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | stars | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Universe | planets | planet formation | star formation | stellar evolution | supernovae | compact objects | white dwarfs | neutron stars | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | galaxy | universe | astrophysics | Sun | supernova | globular clusters | open clusters | jets | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | thermal history | normal galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | physics | Copernicus | Tycho | Kepler | Galileo | classical mechanics | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | matter | telescopes | detectors | 8.282 | 12.402 | plusars | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | stars | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Universe | planets | planet formation | star formation | stellar evolution | supernovae | compact objects | white dwarfs | neutron stars | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | galaxy | universe | astrophysics | Sun | supernova | globular clusters | open clusters | jets | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | thermal history | normal galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | physics | Copernicus | Tycho | Kepler | Galileo | classical mechanics | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | matter | telescopes | detectors | 8.282 | 12.402 | plusars | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | revolution | Europe | Italy | French Revolution | theology | magic | science | England | censorship | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Constantine | printing | rare books | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | free will | Luther | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | religion | Menocchio | skepticism | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Principia | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | d'Alembert | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.050 Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past: Galileo (MIT)

Description

2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's astonishing sightings of features on the moon, stars, and moons around Jupiter that no one had seen before. Recreate these new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques Galileo had on hand, while you reflect on the times and works of Galileo. What was it like to improvise new ways of seeing and exploring from the materials and techniques on hand? What do we notice? What surprises us? How can we relate to past experience and ideas? What are we curious to research? How does our experimenting grow into our learning? Let your own curiosity drive your explorations.

Subjects

Galileo | vertical fall | terrestrial rotation | secondary qualities | special injunction | star furthest | igneous particles | stellar sphere | Galileo Galilei | Copernican Opinion | The Mathematics of Strength | The Parabolic Path of Projectiles | Conservation of Motion | Nicolaus Copernicus | Definition of Uniform Acceleration | Italian physicist | mathematician | astronomer | philosopher | Scientific Revolution | telescope and consequent astronomical observations | Copernicanism | astronomy | modern physics | father of modern science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | stars | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Universe | planets | planet formation | star formation | stellar evolution | supernovae | compact objects | white dwarfs | neutron stars | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | galaxy | universe | astrophysics | Sun | supernova | globular clusters | open clusters | jets | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | thermal history | normal galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | physics | Copernicus | Tycho | Kepler | Galileo | classical mechanics | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | matter | telescopes | detectors | 8.282 | 12.402

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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