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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT) 21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi

Subjects

Popular Culture and Narrative | Popular Culture and Narrative | Literature | Literature | Comics | Comics | Culture | Culture | Literary Fiction | Literary Fiction | Contemporary | Contemporary | Graphic Narratives | Graphic Narratives | broader cultural concerns | broader cultural concerns | contemporary graphic narratives | contemporary graphic narratives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.714 Spanish for Bilingual Students (MIT) 21G.714 Spanish for Bilingual Students (MIT)

Description

Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested  in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills. Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested  in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills.

Subjects

Spanish; Language; Bilingual; Speak; Writing;Literature; Culture | Spanish; Language; Bilingual; Speak; Writing;Literature; Culture | History | History | Society | Society | Economics | Economics | Politics | Politics | Psychology | Psychology | Philosophy | Philosophy | Spanish | Spanish | Language | Language | Bilingual | Bilingual | Speak | Speak | Writing | Writing | Culture | Culture | Literature | Literature | Hispanic | Hispanic | oral grammar | oral grammar | written gramar | written gramar | fiction | fiction | poetry | poetry | Mexican-Americans | Mexican-Americans | Puerto Ricans | Puerto Ricans | Cubans | Cubans | heritage learners | heritage learners | Latino | Latino | immigration | immigration | identity | identity | ethnicity | ethnicity | education | education | vocabulary acquisition | vocabulary acquisition | media representation | media representation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Understanding contemporary society Understanding contemporary society

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. This module introduces students to a range of approaches in social analysis. Through introductions to key concepts, theorists and research studies in the disciplines of sociology, cultural studies and social policy, students will be equipped with the skills necessary for more advanced study of contemporary society. Two routes to reading this module's contents are offered. Those who prefer to read on screen can navigate to each section of interest using the links and menus provided whilst a full print version is also available for those who prefer to read offline and from paper. Suitable for: undergraduate year one level learners. Dr David J Parker, School of Sociology and Social Policy. David Parker is This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. This module introduces students to a range of approaches in social analysis. Through introductions to key concepts, theorists and research studies in the disciplines of sociology, cultural studies and social policy, students will be equipped with the skills necessary for more advanced study of contemporary society. Two routes to reading this module's contents are offered. Those who prefer to read on screen can navigate to each section of interest using the links and menus provided whilst a full print version is also available for those who prefer to read offline and from paper. Suitable for: undergraduate year one level learners. Dr David J Parker, School of Sociology and Social Policy. David Parker is

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Sociology | Sociology | Culture | Culture | Social Policy | Social Policy | Social Science | Social Science | Social Studies | Social Studies

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21F.714 Spanish for Bilingual Students (MIT)

Description

Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested  in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills.

Subjects

Spanish; Language; Bilingual; Speak; Writing;Literature; Culture | History | Society | Economics | Politics | Psychology | Philosophy | Spanish | Language | Bilingual | Speak | Writing | Culture | Literature | Hispanic | oral grammar | written gramar | fiction | poetry | Mexican-Americans | Puerto Ricans | Cubans | heritage learners | Latino | immigration | identity | ethnicity | education | vocabulary acquisition | media representation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period

Description

While recognising the shadows cast by two world wars (one concluded and one imminent) over European society during the 1920s and 1930s, this free course, Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period, demonstrates how a number of specific features indicate that the interwar period was a distinctive and important moment of modernity in the twentieth century, from the rise of the metropolis and the emergence of new forms of mass media, to the changing lifestyles of women and the increasingly interventionist approaches to managing the health and welfare of modern populations. First published on Wed, 09 Dec 2015 as Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 While recognising the shadows cast by two world wars (one concluded and one imminent) over European society during the 1920s and 1930s, this free course, Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period, demonstrates how a number of specific features indicate that the interwar period was a distinctive and important moment of modernity in the twentieth century, from the rise of the metropolis and the emergence of new forms of mass media, to the changing lifestyles of women and the increasingly interventionist approaches to managing the health and welfare of modern populations. First published on Wed, 09 Dec 2015 as Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015

Subjects

History & The Arts | History & The Arts | History | History | Culture | Culture | radio | radio | cinema | cinema | popular culture | popular culture | women | women | fashion | fashion | healthcare | healthcare | infant welfare | infant welfare | venereal disease | venereal disease | metropolis | metropolis | urban culture | urban culture | A327 | A327 | A327_1 | A327_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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The politics of devolution The politics of devolution

Description

This free course, The politics of devolution, which contains material from the current Open University second level Politics course DD203 Power, equality and dissent, is pitched at the intermediate level. It should take you about 8 hours to study if you attempt the recommended exercises and make summary notes of its key points. Doing so will allow you to practise the crucial academic skill of summary and prcis extracting the gist of an argument which will be of particular help if you go on to study in related areas: perhaps the related politics courses on the OpenLearn website or the Open University modules from which they come. First published on Wed, 24 Feb 2016 as The politics of devolution. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, The politics of devolution, which contains material from the current Open University second level Politics course DD203 Power, equality and dissent, is pitched at the intermediate level. It should take you about 8 hours to study if you attempt the recommended exercises and make summary notes of its key points. Doing so will allow you to practise the crucial academic skill of summary and prcis extracting the gist of an argument which will be of particular help if you go on to study in related areas: perhaps the related politics courses on the OpenLearn website or the Open University modules from which they come. First published on Wed, 24 Feb 2016 as The politics of devolution. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Sociology | Sociology | Ireland – Places | Culture & Heritage | Ireland – Places | Culture & Heritage | Scotland | Scotland | DD203_1 | DD203_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Political ordering Political ordering

Description

This unit asks questions about what states are and how they are involved in the processes of governing and ordering social life. Beginning from an awareness of just how much of everyday life involves the state, to if states have this authority to govern. They also ask about situations in which states may not be able to command such authority - where their governing role is not accepted as legitimate. First published on Tue, 04 Feb 2014 as Political ordering. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 This unit asks questions about what states are and how they are involved in the processes of governing and ordering social life. Beginning from an awareness of just how much of everyday life involves the state, to if states have this authority to govern. They also ask about situations in which states may not be able to command such authority - where their governing role is not accepted as legitimate. First published on Tue, 04 Feb 2014 as Political ordering. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014

Subjects

Politics | Politics | Ireland – Places | Culture & Heritage | Ireland – Places | Culture & Heritage | social sciences | social sciences | social policy | social policy | psychology | psychology | identity | identity | government | government | family | family | economy | economy | growth | growth | Northern Ireland | Northern Ireland | DD101_1 | DD101_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi

Subjects

Popular Culture and Narrative | Literature | Comics | Culture | Literary Fiction | Contemporary | Graphic Narratives | broader cultural concerns | contemporary graphic narratives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.215 Medical Anthropology (MIT) 21A.215 Medical Anthropology (MIT)

Description

This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-medicine); students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international. This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-medicine); students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international.

Subjects

Biomedicine | Biomedicine | Cultural Systems | Cultural Systems | Medical Practice | Medical Practice | Culture | Culture | Health | Health | Disease | Disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT) 21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | 21G.022 | WGS.141 | WGS.141 | Women | Women | International | International | Global | Global | Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Writers | Writers | Asia | Asia | Africa | Africa | Middle east | Middle east | Latin america | Latin america | North america | North america | Non-western | Non-western | Gender roles | Gender roles | Culture | Culture | Heritage | Heritage | Female | Female | History | History | Colonialism | Colonialism | Religion | Religion | Nationalism | Nationalism | Socialization | Socialization | Language | Language | Patriarchal | Patriarchal | Sex | Sex | Marriage | Marriage | Politics | Politics | Love | Love | Work | Work | Identity | Identity | Fiction | Fiction | literature | literature | SP.461J | SP.461J | WMN.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | SP.461 | WMN.461 | WMN.461

License

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21G.061 Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture (MIT) 21G.061 Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture (MIT)

Description

This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have e This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have e

Subjects

Plotting | Plotting | Terrorism | Terrorism | European | European | Culture | Culture | Literature | Literature | Opposition | Opposition | Revolution | Revolution | Anarchism | Anarchism | Kleist | Kleist | Conrad | Conrad | Red Brigade | Red Brigade | Italy | Italy | Red Army Faction | Red Army Faction | Germany | Germany | Real Irish Republican Army | Real Irish Republican Army | Media | Media | Ireland | Ireland

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT) 21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT)

Description

Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon

Subjects

Classical roman literature | Classical roman literature | Augustan rome | Augustan rome | Augustus caesar | Augustus caesar | Golden age | Golden age | Republic | Republic | Imperial | Imperial | Western europe | Western europe | Philosophy | Philosophy | Society | Society | Aesthetic | Aesthetic | Politics | Politics | Latin | Latin | History | History | Culture | Culture | Art | Art | Cultural context | Cultural context | Textuality | Textuality | Empire | Empire | Public | Public | Private | Private | Class | Class | Gender | Gender | Pleasure | Pleasure | Caesar | Caesar | Cicero | Cicero | Catullus | Catullus | Livy | Livy | Virgil | Virgil | Horace | Horace | Ovid | Ovid | Cassius Dio | Cassius Dio

License

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

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21G.030 East Asian Culture: From Zen to K-Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Culture: From Zen to K-Pop (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to various forms of culture in East Asia (focusing on China, Japan and Korea), including both traditional and contemporary examples. Critically examines the shared cultural elements that are widely considered to constitute "East Asian culture," and also the diversity within East Asia, historically and today. Examples include religious and philosophical beliefs (Confucianism and Buddhism), literature, art, food, architecture, and popular culture. The study of gender will be an integral part of this subject. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the U.S. are also considered. This class is suitable for students of all levels, and requires no Asian language background. Students who wish to fulfill the MISTI-Singapore requirement m This subject is an introduction to various forms of culture in East Asia (focusing on China, Japan and Korea), including both traditional and contemporary examples. Critically examines the shared cultural elements that are widely considered to constitute "East Asian culture," and also the diversity within East Asia, historically and today. Examples include religious and philosophical beliefs (Confucianism and Buddhism), literature, art, food, architecture, and popular culture. The study of gender will be an integral part of this subject. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the U.S. are also considered. This class is suitable for students of all levels, and requires no Asian language background. Students who wish to fulfill the MISTI-Singapore requirement m

Subjects

East Asia | East Asia | East Asian Cultures | East Asian Cultures | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Japanese culture | Japanese culture | Korean culture | Korean culture | cultural antropology | cultural antropology | foodways | foodways | East Asian Studies | East Asian Studies | traditional East Asian studies | traditional East Asian studies | contemporary East Asian studies | contemporary East Asian studies | Confucianism | Confucianism | Buddhism | Buddhism

License

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21G.714 Spanish for Bilingual Students (MIT)

Description

Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested  in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills.

Subjects

Spanish; Language; Bilingual; Speak; Writing;Literature; Culture | History | Society | Economics | Politics | Psychology | Philosophy | Spanish | Language | Bilingual | Speak | Writing | Culture | Literature | Hispanic | oral grammar | written gramar | fiction | poetry | Mexican-Americans | Puerto Ricans | Cubans | heritage learners | Latino | immigration | identity | ethnicity | education | vocabulary acquisition | media representation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The moral equality of combatants The moral equality of combatants

Description

This free course introduces and explores the idea of the moral equality of combatants and discusses the question of the basis of liability to killing in war. It invites students to understand and assess the epistemological argument for the moral equality of combatants and other arguments for and against this idea. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as The moral equality of combatants. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course introduces and explores the idea of the moral equality of combatants and discusses the question of the basis of liability to killing in war. It invites students to understand and assess the epistemological argument for the moral equality of combatants and other arguments for and against this idea. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as The moral equality of combatants. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

History & The Arts | History & The Arts | Culture | Culture | Philosophy | Philosophy | A333_1 | A333_1 | Walzer | Walzer | McMahan | McMahan | combatants | combatants | moral equality of combatants | moral equality of combatants | liability to killing | liability to killing

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21G.102 Chinese II (Regular) (MIT) 21G.102 Chinese II (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This subject is the second semester of four that forms an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. The emphasis is on further developing students' abilities to participate in simple, practical conversations on everyday topics as well as enhancing their abilities on reading and writing. The relationship between Chinese language and culture and the sociolinguistically appropriate use of language will be stressed throughout. A typical class includes performance of memorized basic conversations, drills, questions and discussion, and various types of communicative exercises. At the end of this course, students are expected to develop an understanding of the language learning process so that they will be able to continue studying effectively on their own. This subject is the second semester of four that forms an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. The emphasis is on further developing students' abilities to participate in simple, practical conversations on everyday topics as well as enhancing their abilities on reading and writing. The relationship between Chinese language and culture and the sociolinguistically appropriate use of language will be stressed throughout. A typical class includes performance of memorized basic conversations, drills, questions and discussion, and various types of communicative exercises. At the end of this course, students are expected to develop an understanding of the language learning process so that they will be able to continue studying effectively on their own.

Subjects

Chinese | Chinese | Language | Language | Writing | Writing | Speaking | Speaking | Culture | Culture | China | China | Asia | Asia | Mandarin | Mandarin | pinyin | pinyin | traditional Chinese characters | traditional Chinese characters | simplified Chinese characters | simplified Chinese characters | basic Chinese | basic Chinese | Chinese 101 | Chinese 101

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.714 Spanish for Bilingual Students (MIT)

Description

Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested  in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills.

Subjects

Spanish; Language; Bilingual; Speak; Writing;Literature; Culture | History | Society | Economics | Politics | Psychology | Philosophy | Spanish | Language | Bilingual | Speak | Writing | Culture | Literature | Hispanic | oral grammar | written gramar | fiction | poetry | Mexican-Americans | Puerto Ricans | Cubans | heritage learners | Latino | immigration | identity | ethnicity | education | vocabulary acquisition | media representation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT) 21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The purpose of this course is to develop: Basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage) Basic reading and writing skills (in both the traditional character set and the simplified) An understanding of the language learning process so that you are able to continue studying effectively on your own. The main text is Wheatley, J. K. Learning Chinese: A Foundation Course in Mandarin. Part I. (unpublished, but available online). (Part II of the book forms the basi This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The purpose of this course is to develop: Basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage) Basic reading and writing skills (in both the traditional character set and the simplified) An understanding of the language learning process so that you are able to continue studying effectively on your own. The main text is Wheatley, J. K. Learning Chinese: A Foundation Course in Mandarin. Part I. (unpublished, but available online). (Part II of the book forms the basi

Subjects

Chinese | Chinese | Language | Language | Writing | Writing | Speaking | Speaking | Culture | Culture | China | China | Asia | Asia | Mandarin | Mandarin | 21F.101 | 21F.101 | 21F.151 | 21F.151

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo

Subjects

contemporary | contemporary | contemporary issues | contemporary issues | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | economic imperialism | economic imperialism | sexual and reproductive politics | sexual and reproductive politics | the ethics of biotechnologies | the ethics of biotechnologies | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | the romance of technology | the romance of technology | robotics and cyborg cultures | robotics and cyborg cultures | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | Honeymoon Phase | Honeymoon Phase | Negotiation Phase | Negotiation Phase | Adjustment Phase | Adjustment Phase | Reverse Culture Shock | Reverse Culture Shock | anxiety | anxiety | feelings | feelings | surprise | surprise | disorientation | disorientation | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | current | current

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT)

Description

What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Drama | Drama | Stoppard | Stoppard | Churchill | Churchill | Play | Play | British | British | Text analysis | Text analysis | Stagecraft | Stagecraft | Writer | Writer | History | History | Politics | Politics | Culture | Culture | Performance | Performance | Comedy | Comedy | 21M.616 | 21M.616

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.703 Spanish 3 (MIT) 21G.703 Spanish 3 (MIT)

Description

The first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. The first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Spanish | Spanish | Spanish grammar | Spanish grammar | Spanish vocabulary | Spanish vocabulary | writing | writing | essays | essays | Culture | Culture | cultural awareness | cultural awareness | conversation | conversation | MITUPV | MITUPV

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT) 21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The purpose of this course is to develop: (a) basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage); (b) basic reading skills (in both the traditional character set and the simplified); (c) an understanding of the way the Chinese writing system is structured, and the ability to copy and write characters; and (d) a sense of what learning a language like Chinese entails, and the sort of learning processes that it involves, so students are able to continue studying effectively on t This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The purpose of this course is to develop: (a) basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage); (b) basic reading skills (in both the traditional character set and the simplified); (c) an understanding of the way the Chinese writing system is structured, and the ability to copy and write characters; and (d) a sense of what learning a language like Chinese entails, and the sort of learning processes that it involves, so students are able to continue studying effectively on t

Subjects

Chinese | Chinese | Language | Language | Writing | Writing | Speaking | Speaking | Culture | Culture | China | China | Asia | Asia | Mandarin | Mandarin | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | chinese | chinese | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | pronunciation | pronunciation | grammar | grammar | vocabulary | vocabulary | reading competence | reading competence | traditional characters | traditional characters | composition | composition | romanization | romanization | simplified characters | simplified characters | 21F.101 | 21F.101 | 21F.151 | 21F.151

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

This class celebrates, analyzes and practices the art and craft of the Science Essay - that is, writing for a general audience on topics in science and technology. We read a variety of essays, but writing and revision are the main work of the class. This class is conducted as a combination workshop/seminar style class. (It is not a lecture class.) This class celebrates, analyzes and practices the art and craft of the Science Essay - that is, writing for a general audience on topics in science and technology. We read a variety of essays, but writing and revision are the main work of the class. This class is conducted as a combination workshop/seminar style class. (It is not a lecture class.)

Subjects

Science | Science | Essay | Essay | Writing | Writing | Technology | Technology | Edit | Edit | Culture | Culture | Themes | Themes | Biography | Biography | Draft | Draft | Portfolio | Portfolio | audience | audience | revision | revision | writers | writers | workshop | workshop

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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