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7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT) 7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Topics include Eukaryotic genome structure, function, and expression, processing of RNA, and regulation of the cell cycle. The techniques and logic used to address important problems in nuclear cell biology is emphasized. Lectures cover broad topic areas in nuclear cell biology and class discussions focus on representative papers recently published in the field. This course covers the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Topics include Eukaryotic genome structure, function, and expression, processing of RNA, and regulation of the cell cycle. The techniques and logic used to address important problems in nuclear cell biology is emphasized. Lectures cover broad topic areas in nuclear cell biology and class discussions focus on representative papers recently published in the field.

Subjects

cell biology | cell biology | nucleus | nucleus | biology | biology | nuclear cell biology | nuclear cell biology | DNA replication | DNA replication | DNA repair | DNA repair | DNA | DNA | genome | genome | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | chromatin | chromatin | gene expression | gene expression | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | RNA | RNA | RNA interference | RNA interference | mRNA | mRNA | microRNA | microRNA | RNAi | RNAi

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Tumor Suppressor Gene p53: How the Guardian of our Genome Prevents Cancer (MIT) 7.344 Tumor Suppressor Gene p53: How the Guardian of our Genome Prevents Cancer (MIT)

Description

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer involves uncontrolled cell growth, resistance to cell death, failure to differentiate into a particular cell type, and increased cellular motility. A family of gate-keeper genes, known as tumor suppressor genes, plays important roles in preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Among these, p53 is the most famous. Because of its essential role in maintaining genomic integrity, p53 is often called the guardian of the genome. During this course, we will study how p53 serves as a pivotal tumor suppressor gene in preventing cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to disc Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer involves uncontrolled cell growth, resistance to cell death, failure to differentiate into a particular cell type, and increased cellular motility. A family of gate-keeper genes, known as tumor suppressor genes, plays important roles in preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Among these, p53 is the most famous. Because of its essential role in maintaining genomic integrity, p53 is often called the guardian of the genome. During this course, we will study how p53 serves as a pivotal tumor suppressor gene in preventing cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to disc

Subjects

tumor suppressor gene | tumor suppressor gene | p53 | p53 | p53 protein | p53 protein | cancer | cancer | cell-growth signals | cell-growth signals | cell cycle regulation | cell cycle regulation | DNA damage | DNA damage | DNA repair | DNA repair | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | apoptosis | apoptosis | genome integrity | genome integrity | oncogenes | oncogenes | p53 mutations | p53 mutations | mouse cancer models | mouse cancer models | Mdm2 | Mdm2 | microRNA | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT) 7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to teach both the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Lectures and class discussions will cover the background and fundamental findings in a particular area of nuclear cell biology. The assigned readings will provide concrete examples of the experimental approaches and logic used to establish these findings. Some examples of topics include genome and systems biology, transcription, and gene expression. The goal of this course is to teach both the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Lectures and class discussions will cover the background and fundamental findings in a particular area of nuclear cell biology. The assigned readings will provide concrete examples of the experimental approaches and logic used to establish these findings. Some examples of topics include genome and systems biology, transcription, and gene expression.

Subjects

cell biology | cell biology | nucleus | nucleus | biology | biology | nuclear cell biology | nuclear cell biology | DNA replication | DNA replication | DNA repair | DNA repair | DNA | DNA | genome | genome | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | transcriptional regulation | transcriptional regulation | gene expression | gene expression | chromatin | chromatin | chromosomes | chromosomes | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | RNA | RNA | RNA interference | RNA interference | mRNA | mRNA | microRNA | microRNA | RNAi | RNAi

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Genome Integrity

Description

Dr Opher Gileadi tells us how cells maintain genome integrity and how we can use it in our fight against cancer. Dr Opher Gileadi studies the structure and chemical biology of proteins involved in DNA repair and in recovery from DNA damage. DNA damage can be both a cause of cancer and a tool in fighting cancer, and the work aims to uncover ways to better target and destroy cancer cells. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

DNA repair | Structural Genomics | cancer | DNA repair | Structural Genomics | cancer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Genome Integrity

Description

Dr Opher Gileadi tells us how cells maintain genome integrity and how we can use it in our fight against cancer. Dr Opher Gileadi studies the structure and chemical biology of proteins involved in DNA repair and in recovery from DNA damage. DNA damage can be both a cause of cancer and a tool in fighting cancer, and the work aims to uncover ways to better target and destroy cancer cells. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

DNA repair | Structural Genomics | cancer | DNA repair | Structural Genomics | cancer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.346 DNA Wars: How the Cell Strikes Back to Avoid Disease after Attacks on DNA (MIT) 7.346 DNA Wars: How the Cell Strikes Back to Avoid Disease after Attacks on DNA (MIT)

Description

A never-ending molecular war takes place in the nucleus of your cells, with DNA damage occurring at a rate of over 20,000 lesions per cell per day. Where does this damage come from, and what are its consequences? What are the differences in the molecular blueprint between individuals who can sustain attacks on DNA and remain healthy compared to those who become sick? This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. A never-ending molecular war takes place in the nucleus of your cells, with DNA damage occurring at a rate of over 20,000 lesions per cell per day. Where does this damage come from, and what are its consequences? What are the differences in the molecular blueprint between individuals who can sustain attacks on DNA and remain healthy compared to those who become sick? This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA damage | DNA damage | DNA repair | DNA repair | mismatch repair | mismatch repair | direct reversal | direct reversal | nucleotide excision repair | nucleotide excision repair | base excision repair | base excision repair | double strand break repair | double strand break repair | nuclear DNA damage | nuclear DNA damage | mitochondrial DNA damage | mitochondrial DNA damage | Alkylating agents | Alkylating agents | replication errors | replication errors | mutations | mutations | epigenetics | epigenetics | Werner helicase activity | Werner helicase activity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Topics include Eukaryotic genome structure, function, and expression, processing of RNA, and regulation of the cell cycle. The techniques and logic used to address important problems in nuclear cell biology is emphasized. Lectures cover broad topic areas in nuclear cell biology and class discussions focus on representative papers recently published in the field.

Subjects

cell biology | nucleus | biology | nuclear cell biology | DNA replication | DNA repair | DNA | genome | cell cycle control | chromatin | gene expression | replication | transcription | RNA | RNA interference | mRNA | microRNA | RNAi

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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7.346 DNA Wars: How the Cell Strikes Back to Avoid Disease after Attacks on DNA (MIT)

Description

A never-ending molecular war takes place in the nucleus of your cells, with DNA damage occurring at a rate of over 20,000 lesions per cell per day. Where does this damage come from, and what are its consequences? What are the differences in the molecular blueprint between individuals who can sustain attacks on DNA and remain healthy compared to those who become sick? This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA damage | DNA repair | mismatch repair | direct reversal | nucleotide excision repair | base excision repair | double strand break repair | nuclear DNA damage | mitochondrial DNA damage | Alkylating agents | replication errors | mutations | epigenetics | Werner helicase activity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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7.344 Tumor Suppressor Gene p53: How the Guardian of our Genome Prevents Cancer (MIT)

Description

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer involves uncontrolled cell growth, resistance to cell death, failure to differentiate into a particular cell type, and increased cellular motility. A family of gate-keeper genes, known as tumor suppressor genes, plays important roles in preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Among these, p53 is the most famous. Because of its essential role in maintaining genomic integrity, p53 is often called the guardian of the genome. During this course, we will study how p53 serves as a pivotal tumor suppressor gene in preventing cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to disc

Subjects

tumor suppressor gene | p53 | p53 protein | cancer | cell-growth signals | cell cycle regulation | DNA damage | DNA repair | programmed cell death | apoptosis | genome integrity | oncogenes | p53 mutations | mouse cancer models | Mdm2 | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to teach both the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Lectures and class discussions will cover the background and fundamental findings in a particular area of nuclear cell biology. The assigned readings will provide concrete examples of the experimental approaches and logic used to establish these findings. Some examples of topics include genome and systems biology, transcription, and gene expression.

Subjects

cell biology | nucleus | biology | nuclear cell biology | DNA replication | DNA repair | DNA | genome | cell cycle control | transcriptional regulation | gene expression | chromatin | chromosomes | replication | transcription | RNA | RNA interference | mRNA | microRNA | RNAi

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

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