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SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction

Description

This free course, Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction, examines the philosophical questions surrounding the mind. You will examine how beliefs have changed over the centuries and be able to contrast the views of Descartes with more modern ideas. First published on Wed, 27 Jan 2016 as Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction, examines the philosophical questions surrounding the mind. You will examine how beliefs have changed over the centuries and be able to contrast the views of Descartes with more modern ideas. First published on Wed, 27 Jan 2016 as Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | mind | mind | imagination | imagination | beliefs | beliefs | Descartes | Descartes | AA308_1 | AA308_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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24.805 Topics in Theory of Knowledge: A Priori Knowledge (MIT) 24.805 Topics in Theory of Knowledge: A Priori Knowledge (MIT)

Description

The seminar will explore the phenomenon of a priori knowledge. We'll consider some notable attempts to account for a priori knowledge in the history of philosophy (e.g., by Plato, Descartes, Hume, and Kant), some influential critiques of the notion; we will end by considering some contemporary approaches to the a priori. The seminar will explore the phenomenon of a priori knowledge. We'll consider some notable attempts to account for a priori knowledge in the history of philosophy (e.g., by Plato, Descartes, Hume, and Kant), some influential critiques of the notion; we will end by considering some contemporary approaches to the a priori.

Subjects

a priori knowledge | a priori knowledge | Plato | Plato | Descartes | Descartes | Hume | Hume | Kant | Kant | Leibniz | Leibniz | Locke | Locke | Hume and the Positivists | Hume and the Positivists | history of philosophy | history of philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT) STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine. This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Subjects

Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | science | science | cosmology | cosmology | natural history | natural history | physics | physics | mathematics | mathematics | astronomy | astronomy | medicine | medicine | alchemy | alchemy | technology | technology | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Hippocrates | Hippocrates | Ptolemy | Ptolemy | Euclid | Euclid | Galen | Galen | Vesalius | Vesalius | Copernicus | Copernicus | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | Bacon | Bacon | Descartes | Descartes | Newton | Newton | history | history | culture | culture | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | Latin West | Latin West | western | western | natural science | natural science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.211 Theory of Knowledge (MIT) 24.211 Theory of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to epistemology: the theory of knowledge. We will focus on skepticism—that is, the thesis that we know nothing at all—and we will survey a range of skeptical arguments and responses to skepticism. This course is an introduction to epistemology: the theory of knowledge. We will focus on skepticism—that is, the thesis that we know nothing at all—and we will survey a range of skeptical arguments and responses to skepticism.

Subjects

epistemology | epistemology | theory of knowledge | theory of knowledge | skepticism | skepticism | common sense | common sense | Descartes | Descartes | closure of knowledge | closure of knowledge | Dretske | Dretske | sensitivity | sensitivity | dogmatism | dogmatism | bootstrapping | bootstrapping | default entitlement | default entitlement | certainty | certainty | contextualism | contextualism | practical interest | practical interest | Vogel | Vogel | Russell | Russell | lottery paradox | lottery paradox | Hawthornel | Hawthornel | Putnam | Putnam | brains in a vat | brains in a vat | semantic externalism | semantic externalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.01 Classics in Western Philosophy (MIT) 24.01 Classics in Western Philosophy (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce you to the Western philosophical tradition, through the study of major figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant. You will get to grips with questions that have been significant to philosophy from its beginnings: questions about the nature of the mind or soul, the existence of God, the foundations of knowledge, ethics and the good life. In the process of evaluating the arguments of these philosophers, you will develop your own philosophical and analytical skills. You will also observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious and political concerns on the development of philosophical ideas. Lecture handouts will be supplied for Lec #1-8, and #16-25. For the section on Descartes' Meditations, Lec #9-15, m This course will introduce you to the Western philosophical tradition, through the study of major figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant. You will get to grips with questions that have been significant to philosophy from its beginnings: questions about the nature of the mind or soul, the existence of God, the foundations of knowledge, ethics and the good life. In the process of evaluating the arguments of these philosophers, you will develop your own philosophical and analytical skills. You will also observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious and political concerns on the development of philosophical ideas. Lecture handouts will be supplied for Lec #1-8, and #16-25. For the section on Descartes' Meditations, Lec #9-15, m

Subjects

Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Descartes | Descartes | Hume | Hume | Kant | Kant | Russell | Russell | Sartre | Sartre

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) ES.SP.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.059 Paradigms of European Thought and Culture (MIT) 21G.059 Paradigms of European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys the main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe (Geistesgeschichte, histoire des idées). The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. With each text, special consideration will be devoted to the work's enduring influence over contemporary European culture. This subject surveys the main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe (Geistesgeschichte, histoire des idées). The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. With each text, special consideration will be devoted to the work's enduring influence over contemporary European culture.

Subjects

Paradigms | Paradigms | European | European | Thought | Thought | Culture | Culture | History | History | Protestant Reformation | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | French Revolution | Luther | Luther | Descartes | Descartes | Kant | Kant | Hegel | Hegel | Rousseau | Rousseau | Smith | Smith | Marx | Marx | Freud | Freud | Goya | Goya | David | David | Duchamp | Duchamp | Schinkel | Schinkel | Bach | Bach | Goethe | Goethe | Political Theory | Political Theory | Philosophy | Philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.059 European Thought and Culture (MIT) 21G.059 European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film. This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film.

Subjects

Paradigms | Paradigms | European | European | Thought | Thought | Culture | Culture | History | History | Protestant Reformation | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | French Revolution | Luther | Luther | Descartes | Descartes | Kant | Kant | Hegel | Hegel | Rousseau | Rousseau | Smith | Smith | Marx | Marx | Freud | Freud | Goya | Goya | David | David | Duchamp | Duchamp | Schinkel | Schinkel | Bach | Bach | Goethe | Goethe | political theory | political theory | philosophy | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT) ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Plato | Euclid | Euclid | Aristotle | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | number | number | irrational number | irrational number | ratio | ratio | ethics | ethics | logos | logos | logic | logic | ancient knowing | ancient knowing | modern knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | Greek conception of number | idea of number | idea of number | courage | courage | justice | justice | pursuit of truth | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.059 Paradigms of European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys the main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe (Geistesgeschichte, histoire des idées). The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. With each text, special consideration will be devoted to the work's enduring influence over contemporary European culture.

Subjects

Paradigms | European | Thought | Culture | History | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | Luther | Descartes | Kant | Hegel | Rousseau | Smith | Marx | Freud | Goya | David | Duchamp | Schinkel | Bach | Goethe | Political Theory | Philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.01 Classics in Western Philosophy (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce you to the Western philosophical tradition, through the study of major figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant. You will get to grips with questions that have been significant to philosophy from its beginnings: questions about the nature of the mind or soul, the existence of God, the foundations of knowledge, ethics and the good life. In the process of evaluating the arguments of these philosophers, you will develop your own philosophical and analytical skills. You will also observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious and political concerns on the development of philosophical ideas. Lecture handouts will be supplied for Lec #1-8, and #16-25. For the section on Descartes' Meditations, Lec #9-15, m

Subjects

Plato | Aristotle | Descartes | Hume | Kant | Russell | Sartre

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.2H3 Ancient Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Subjects

mathematics | geometry | history | philosophy | Greek philosophy | Plato | Euclid | Aristotle | Rene Descartes | Nicomachus | Francis Bacon | number | irrational number | ratio | ethics | logos | logic | ancient knowing | modern knowing | Greek conception of number | idea of number | courage | justice | pursuit of truth | truth as a surd

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DP48 34 Philosophy B: Aspects of the History and Development of Western Philosophy

Description

This Unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of aspects of the historical development of the western philosophical discourse. The emphasis is upon creating an overarching view of the history of ongoing philosophical debate by examining key philosophers and key issues. The Unit begins by examining the roots of western philosophy in classical Greece, follows the development of philosophy through Christian medieval theology and ends with its emergence in enlightenment Europe. On Completion of the Unit you should be able to: 1. Explain Plato’s ‘Theory of Forms’ and Aristotle’s alternative account of form. 2. Explain aspects of epistemological and metaphysical debates in Christian Medieval Philosophy. 3. Evaluate the epistemology of René Descartes 4. Evaluate the epistemology

Subjects

DP4834 | The Greeks | Early Christian Theology | Renaissance | Descartes | Liberalism | the Enlightenment | David Hume | the Utilitarians | D: Humanities (History/Archaeology/Religious Studies/Philosophy) | HUMANITIES (HISTORY / ARCHAEOLOGY / RELIGIOUS STUDIES / PHILOSOPHY) | SCQF Level 7

License

Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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24.211 Theory of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to epistemology: the theory of knowledge. We will focus on skepticism—that is, the thesis that we know nothing at all—and we will survey a range of skeptical arguments and responses to skepticism.

Subjects

epistemology | theory of knowledge | skepticism | common sense | Descartes | closure of knowledge | Dretske | sensitivity | dogmatism | bootstrapping | default entitlement | certainty | contextualism | practical interest | Vogel | Russell | lottery paradox | Hawthornel | Putnam | brains in a vat | semantic externalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Minds and mental phenomena: An introduction

Description

This free course examines the philosophical questions surrounding the mind. You will examine how beliefs have changed over the centuries and be able to contrast the views of Descartes with more modern ideas.

Subjects

Philosophy | minds | imagination | beliefs | Descartes | AA308_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Subjects

Antiquity | Middle Ages | Renaissance | science | cosmology | natural history | physics | mathematics | astronomy | medicine | alchemy | technology | Plato | Aristotle | Hippocrates | Ptolemy | Euclid | Galen | Vesalius | Copernicus | Kepler | Galileo | Bacon | Descartes | Newton | history | culture | scientific revolution | Latin West | western | natural science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Subjects

Antiquity | Middle Ages | Renaissance | science | cosmology | natural history | physics | mathematics | astronomy | medicine | alchemy | technology | Plato | Aristotle | Hippocrates | Ptolemy | Euclid | Galen | Vesalius | Copernicus | Kepler | Galileo | Bacon | Descartes | Newton | history | culture | scientific revolution | Latin West | western | natural science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.01 Classics of Western Philosophy (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce you to the Western philosophical tradition through the study of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Cavendish, Hume, and Kant. You'll grapple with questions that have been significant to philosophy from its beginnings: Questions about the nature of the mind, the existence of God, the foundations of knowledge, and the good life. You'll also observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious, and political concerns on the development of philosophical ideas.

Subjects

Plato | Aristotle | Descartes | Cavendish | Hume | Kant | god | existence of god | Socrates | Margaret Cavendish | John Stuart Mill | W.E.B. Du Bois | Simone de Beauvoir | utilitarianism | slavery | women's rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.059 European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film.

Subjects

Paradigms | European | Thought | Culture | History | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | Luther | Descartes | Kant | Hegel | Rousseau | Smith | Marx | Freud | Goya | David | Duchamp | Schinkel | Bach | Goethe | political theory | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.113 Ancient Greek Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics. We investigate how ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality / irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. The course examines how discovery of the incommensurability of magnitudes challenged the Greek presumption that the cosmos is fully understandable. Students explore the influence of mathematics on ancient Greek ethical theories. We read such authors as: Euclid, Plato, Aristotle, Nicomachus, Theon of Smyrna, Bacon, Descartes, Dedekind, and Newton.

Subjects

Greek | philosophy | mathematics | definition | reason | argument | proof | rationality | irrationality | truth | ethics | Euclid | Plato | Aristotle | Nicomachus | Theon of Smyrna | Bacon | Descartes | Dededkind | Newton

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.01 Classics in Western Philosophy (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce you to the Western philosophical tradition, through the study of major figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant. You will get to grips with questions that have been significant to philosophy from its beginnings: questions about the nature of the mind or soul, the existence of God, the foundations of knowledge, ethics and the good life. In the process of evaluating the arguments of these philosophers, you will develop your own philosophical and analytical skills. You will also observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious and political concerns on the development of philosophical ideas. Lecture handouts will be supplied for Lec #1-8, and #16-25. For the section on Descartes' Meditations, Lec #9-15, m

Subjects

Plato | Aristotle | Descartes | Hume | Kant | Russell | Sartre

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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