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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.053 Introduction to Optimization (MIT) 15.053 Introduction to Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.053 is an undergraduate subject in the theory and practice of optimization. We will consider optimization models with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, E-business, project management, finance as well as several other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of optimization as well as heuristics, and we will present algorithms and theory for linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, and non-linear programming.One way of summarizing a subject is a lecture by lecture description of the subject, or a description of the methodologies presented in the subject. We do list a lecture by lecture description, but first we describe several cross cutting themes. 15.053 is an undergraduate subject in the theory and practice of optimization. We will consider optimization models with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, E-business, project management, finance as well as several other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of optimization as well as heuristics, and we will present algorithms and theory for linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, and non-linear programming.One way of summarizing a subject is a lecture by lecture description of the subject, or a description of the methodologies presented in the subject. We do list a lecture by lecture description, but first we describe several cross cutting themes.

Subjects

finance | finance | project management | project management | E-commerce | E-commerce | heuristics | heuristics | non-linear programming | non-linear programming | integer programming | integer programming | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | network optimization | network optimization | linear programming | linear programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | product differentiation | barriers to entry | network externalities | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.053 Introduction to Optimization (MIT)

Description

15.053 is an undergraduate subject in the theory and practice of optimization. We will consider optimization models with applications to transportation, logistics, manufacturing, computer science, E-business, project management, finance as well as several other domains. This subject will survey some of the applications of optimization as well as heuristics, and we will present algorithms and theory for linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, and non-linear programming.One way of summarizing a subject is a lecture by lecture description of the subject, or a description of the methodologies presented in the subject. We do list a lecture by lecture description, but first we describe several cross cutting themes.

Subjects

finance | project management | E-commerce | heuristics | non-linear programming | integer programming | dynamic programming | network optimization | linear programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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