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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | economics | economics | output | output | employment | employment | determination | determination | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | Federal Reserve | Federal Reserve | inflation | inflation | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | public debt | public debt | international economics | international economics | goods market | goods market | market | market | financial markets | financial markets | open economy | open economy | exchange rate | exchange rate | labor market | labor market | phillips curve | phillips curve | growth | growth | Solow's model | Solow's model | MACROECONOMICS | MACROECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | OUTPUT | OUTPUT | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | EMPLOYMENT | EMPLOYMENT | DETERMINATION | DETERMINATION | UNEMPLOYMENT | UNEMPLOYMENT | INTEREST RATES | INTEREST RATES | FEDERAL RESERVE | FEDERAL RESERVE | INFLATION | INFLATION | MONETARY POLICY | MONETARY POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | PUBLIC DEBT | PUBLIC DEBT | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | GOODS MARKET | GOODS MARKET | MARKET | MARKET | FINANCIAL MARKETS | FINANCIAL MARKETS | OPEN ECONOMY | OPEN ECONOMY | EXCHANGE RATE | EXCHANGE RATE | LABOR MARKET | LABOR MARKET | PHILLIPS CURVE | PHILLIPS CURVE | GROWTH | GROWTH | SOLOW'S MODEL | SOLOW'S MODEL | Economics | Economics | Output | Output | Employment | Employment | Determination | Determination | Unemployment | Unemployment | Interest Rates | Interest Rates | Inflation | Inflation | Monetary Policy | Monetary Policy | Fiscal Policy | Fiscal Policy | Public Debt | Public Debt | International Economics | International Economics | Goods Market | Goods Market | Market | Market | Financial Markets | Financial Markets | Open Economy | Open Economy | Exchange Rate | Exchange Rate | Labor Market | Labor Market | Phillips Curve | Phillips Curve | Growth | Growth | Solow's Model | Solow's Model

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT) 14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT)

Description

This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results. This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | research | research | communication | communication | hypotheses | hypotheses | data | data | analysis | analysis | results | results | STATA | STATA | data sets | data sets | writing | writing | econometrics | econometrics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.54 International Trade (MIT) 14.54 International Trade (MIT)

Description

The course will help us understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. The subject is one of the oldest fields in economics and is extremely topical at the moment, with the ongoing debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the large current account deficits of the US, the prospects for exchange rates, and the calls for a new global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. In the course we will both cover the basic tools and some topics of current interest. The course will help us understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. The subject is one of the oldest fields in economics and is extremely topical at the moment, with the ongoing debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the large current account deficits of the US, the prospects for exchange rates, and the calls for a new global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. In the course we will both cover the basic tools and some topics of current interest.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | international | international | trade | trade | goods | goods | countries | countries | savings | savings | investments | investments | international finance | international finance | globalization | globalization | free trade | free trade | t deficits | t deficits | United States | United States | exchange rates | exchange rates | financial crises | financial crises | East Asia | East Asia | Argentina | Argentina

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.12 Economic Applications of Game Theory (MIT) 14.12 Economic Applications of Game Theory (MIT)

Description

Game Theory is a misnomer for Multiperson Decision Theory, the analysis of situations in which payoffs to agents depend on the behavior of other agents. It involves the analysis of conflict, cooperation, and (tacit) communication. Game theory has applications in several fields, such as economics, politics, law, biology, and computer science. In this course, I will introduce the basic tools of game theoretic analysis. In the process, I will outline some of the many applications of game theory, primarily in economics and political science. Game Theory has emerged as a branch of mathematics and is still quite mathematical. Our emphasis will be on the conceptual analysis, keeping the level of math to a minimum, especially at a level that should be quite acceptable to the average MIT student. Game Theory is a misnomer for Multiperson Decision Theory, the analysis of situations in which payoffs to agents depend on the behavior of other agents. It involves the analysis of conflict, cooperation, and (tacit) communication. Game theory has applications in several fields, such as economics, politics, law, biology, and computer science. In this course, I will introduce the basic tools of game theoretic analysis. In the process, I will outline some of the many applications of game theory, primarily in economics and political science. Game Theory has emerged as a branch of mathematics and is still quite mathematical. Our emphasis will be on the conceptual analysis, keeping the level of math to a minimum, especially at a level that should be quite acceptable to the average MIT student.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | game theory | game theory | multiperson decision theory | multiperson decision theory | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | communication | communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

macroeconomics | economics | output | employment | determination | unemployment | interest rates | Federal Reserve | inflation | monetary policy | fiscal policy | public debt | international economics | goods market | market | financial markets | open economy | exchange rate | labor market | phillips curve | growth | Solow's model | MACROECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | OUTPUT | Macroeconomics | EMPLOYMENT | DETERMINATION | UNEMPLOYMENT | INTEREST RATES | FEDERAL RESERVE | INFLATION | MONETARY POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | PUBLIC DEBT | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | GOODS MARKET | MARKET | FINANCIAL MARKETS | OPEN ECONOMY | EXCHANGE RATE | LABOR MARKET | PHILLIPS CURVE | GROWTH | SOLOW'S MODEL | Economics | Output | Employment | Determination | Unemployment | Interest Rates | Inflation | Monetary Policy | Fiscal Policy | Public Debt | International Economics | Goods Market | Market | Financial Markets | Open Economy | Exchange Rate | Labor Market | Phillips Curve | Growth | Solow's Model

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | bargaining | economics of the family | economics of the family | decision to work | decision to work | home production | home production | monpsony | monpsony | education | education | training | training

License

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Economics explains discrimination in the labour market Economics explains discrimination in the labour market

Description

Discrimination in the labour market exists in many forms: the 'glass ceiling', ageism, racism, and so on. This free course, Economics explains discrimination in the labour market, will help you look at this problem from a new perspective: through economics. You will learn how economists have tried to understand what drives this distortion of the labour market and why women and those from minority ethnic groups seem to suffer the most. First published on Thu, 14 Jul 2011 as Economics explains discrimination in the labour market. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 Discrimination in the labour market exists in many forms: the 'glass ceiling', ageism, racism, and so on. This free course, Economics explains discrimination in the labour market, will help you look at this problem from a new perspective: through economics. You will learn how economists have tried to understand what drives this distortion of the labour market and why women and those from minority ethnic groups seem to suffer the most. First published on Thu, 14 Jul 2011 as Economics explains discrimination in the labour market. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Economics | Economics | discrimination | discrimination

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies. This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | institutions | institutions | unions | unions | worker motivation | worker motivation | technology | technology | social capital | social capital | networks | networks | identity | identity | careers | careers | transformation | transformation | distribution | distribution | wage | wage | salary | salary | income | income | United States | United States | advanced industrial countries | advanced industrial countries | theory | theory | analysis | analysis | developing economies | developing economies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth. This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses | labor history | labor history | discrimination | discrimination | technology | technology | institutions | institutions | financial crises | financial crises | migration | migration | recovery after shocks | recovery after shocks | wages | wages | inequality | inequality | health | health | stock market regulation | stock market regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course will provide an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are the public debt and international economic issues. It introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course will provide an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are the public debt and international economic issues. It introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | the determination of output | the determination of output | employment | employment | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | inflation | inflation | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | as are the public debt and international economic issues | the determination of output | employment | unemployment | interest rates | and inflation | the determination of output | employment | unemployment | interest rates | and inflation | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | Monetary policies | Monetary policies | Fiscal policies | Fiscal policies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course. This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.126 Game Theory (MIT) 14.126 Game Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is a rigorous investigation of the evolutionary and epistemic foundations of solution concepts, such as rationalizability and Nash equilibrium. It covers classical topics, such as repeated games, bargaining, and supermodular games as well as new topics such as global games, heterogeneous priors, psychological games, and games without expected utility maximization. Applications are provided when available. This course is a rigorous investigation of the evolutionary and epistemic foundations of solution concepts, such as rationalizability and Nash equilibrium. It covers classical topics, such as repeated games, bargaining, and supermodular games as well as new topics such as global games, heterogeneous priors, psychological games, and games without expected utility maximization. Applications are provided when available.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | game theory | game theory | Nash Bargaining | Nash Bargaining | Price Theory | Price Theory | Sequential Bargaining | Sequential Bargaining

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | fluctuations | fluctuations | consumption | consumption | saving | saving | choice | choice | labor | labor | leisure | leisure | RBC model | RBC model | non trivial investment decisions | non trivial investment decisions | money | money | price setting | price setting | staggering price decisions | staggering price decisions | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | monetary policy. | monetary policy. | monetary policy | monetary policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course. This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.382 Econometrics I (MIT) 14.382 Econometrics I (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the specification and estimation of the linear regression model. The course departs from the standard Gauss-Markov assumptions to include heteroskedasticity, serial correlation, and errors in variables. Advanced topics include generalized least squares, instrumental variables, nonlinear regression, and limited dependent variable models. Economic applications are discussed throughout the course. This course focuses on the specification and estimation of the linear regression model. The course departs from the standard Gauss-Markov assumptions to include heteroskedasticity, serial correlation, and errors in variables. Advanced topics include generalized least squares, instrumental variables, nonlinear regression, and limited dependent variable models. Economic applications are discussed throughout the course.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | econometrics | econometrics | linear regression model | linear regression model | Gauss-Markov | Gauss-Markov | heteroskedasticity | heteroskedasticity | serial correlation | serial correlation | errors | errors | variables | variables | generalized least squares | generalized least squares | instrumental variables | instrumental variables | nonlinear regression | nonlinear regression | limited dependent variable models | limited dependent variable models

License

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14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT) 14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT)

Description

This course/workshop aims to provide an invigorating intellectual environment for graduate students and junior faculty who are interested in economic theory. We will discuss research ideas and explore topics in game theory and more broadly in economic theory. This course/workshop aims to provide an invigorating intellectual environment for graduate students and junior faculty who are interested in economic theory. We will discuss research ideas and explore topics in game theory and more broadly in economic theory.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | game theory | game theory | bargaining | bargaining | information | information | asymmetric | asymmetric | empirical | empirical | experimental | experimental | studies | studies | heterogeneous beliefs | heterogeneous beliefs | uncertainty | uncertainty | unawareness | unawareness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ECON101 - Principles of Economics I ECON101 - Principles of Economics I

Description

The definition of the economic problems and market systems. Demand and consumer behavior, supply, production and costs. Price determination and equilibrium of the firm under different market structures. Pricing factors of production. Public goods and exte The definition of the economic problems and market systems. Demand and consumer behavior, supply, production and costs. Price determination and equilibrium of the firm under different market structures. Pricing factors of production. Public goods and exte

Subjects

Principles of Economics I | Principles of Economics I

License

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14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT) 14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT)

Description

This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results. All students will be expected to have successfully completed Introduction to Statistical Methods in Economics and Econometrics (or their equivalents) as well as courses in basic microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students may find it useful to take at least one economics field course and perform a UROP before taking this course, but these are not requirements. This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results. All students will be expected to have successfully completed Introduction to Statistical Methods in Economics and Econometrics (or their equivalents) as well as courses in basic microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students may find it useful to take at least one economics field course and perform a UROP before taking this course, but these are not requirements.

Subjects

empirical economics | empirical economics | econometrics | econometrics | mathematical economics | mathematical economics | statistics | statistics | Economics | Economics | research | research | communication | communication | hypotheses | hypotheses | data | data | analysis | analysis | results | results | STATA | STATA | data sets | data sets | writing | writing

License

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the field of Labor Economics, with an eye to helping students think critically about research and public policy. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, human capital, minimum wages, income distribution, unions and strikes, immigration, incentives, discrimination, unemployment and unemployment insurance. The course is an introduction to the field of Labor Economics, with an eye to helping students think critically about research and public policy. The emphasis is on applied microeconomics and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, human capital, minimum wages, income distribution, unions and strikes, immigration, incentives, discrimination, unemployment and unemployment insurance.

Subjects

Labor Economics | Labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance

License

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations.The course is organized around nine topics/sections:Fluctuations and FactsThe basic model: the consumption/saving choiceAllowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model)Allowing for non trivial investment decisionsAllowing for two goodsIntroducing moneyIntroducing price settingIntroducing staggering of price decisionsApplications to fiscal and monetary policy MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations.The course is organized around nine topics/sections:Fluctuations and FactsThe basic model: the consumption/saving choiceAllowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model)Allowing for non trivial investment decisionsAllowing for two goodsIntroducing moneyIntroducing price settingIntroducing staggering of price decisionsApplications to fiscal and monetary policy MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | fluctuations | fluctuations | consumption | consumption | saving | saving | money | money | labor | labor | leisure | leisure | investment | investment | goods | goods | price setting | price setting | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | monetary policy | monetary policy

License

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14.30 Introduction to Statistical Method in Economics (MIT) 14.30 Introduction to Statistical Method in Economics (MIT)

Description

This course will provide a solid foundation in probability and statistics for economists and other social scientists. We will emphasize topics needed in the further study of econometrics and provide basic preparation for 14.32. No prior preparation in probability and statistics is required, but familiarity with basic algebra and calculus is assumed. This course will provide a solid foundation in probability and statistics for economists and other social scientists. We will emphasize topics needed in the further study of econometrics and provide basic preparation for 14.32. No prior preparation in probability and statistics is required, but familiarity with basic algebra and calculus is assumed.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | statistics | statistics | methods | methods | probability | probability | economists | economists | social scientists | social scientists | econometrics | econometrics | algebra | algebra | calculus | calculus

License

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14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT) 14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT)

Description

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. It will start the process of preparing economics Ph.D. students to conduct thesis research in the area, and may also be of interest to doctoral students working in other areas of economics and related fields. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies.The course presumes that students have a familiarity with micro theory, basic game theory and some econometrics. The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. It will start the process of preparing economics Ph.D. students to conduct thesis research in the area, and may also be of interest to doctoral students working in other areas of economics and related fields. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies.The course presumes that students have a familiarity with micro theory, basic game theory and some econometrics.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | monopoly | monopoly | auctions | auctions | oligopoly | oligopoly | price discrimination | price discrimination

License

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