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8.962 General Relativity (MIT) 8.962 General Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Also discussed are differential geometry, gravitomagnetism, gravitational radiation, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology. This course covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Also discussed are differential geometry, gravitomagnetism, gravitational radiation, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology.

Subjects

Einstein's general theory of relativity | Einstein's general theory of relativity | Einstein | Einstein | relativity | relativity | differential geometry | differential geometry | general relativity | general relativity | black holes | black holes | cosmology | cosmology | Hamiltonian Dynamics | Hamiltonian Dynamics | Curvature | Curvature | Acceleration | Acceleration | Hilbert action | Hilbert action | Orthonormal bases | Orthonormal bases | White dwarfs | White dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | Kruskal coordinates | Kruskal coordinates | Wormholes | Wormholes | Hawking radiation | Hawking radiation | Kerr solution | Kerr solution

License

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8.962 General Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Also discussed are differential geometry, gravitomagnetism, gravitational radiation, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology.

Subjects

Einstein's general theory of relativity | Einstein | relativity | differential geometry | general relativity | black holes | cosmology | Hamiltonian Dynamics | Curvature | Acceleration | Hilbert action | Orthonormal bases | White dwarfs | neutron stars | Kruskal coordinates | Wormholes | Hawking radiation | Kerr solution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page. This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology; | technology | technology | society | society | modern | modern | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | present | present | discovery | discovery | progress | progress | history | history | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | biology | biology | genetics | genetics | geology | geology | medicine | medicine | psychology | psychology | computer science | computer science | race | race | ethics | ethics | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | warfare | warfare | evolution | evolution | Freud | Freud | Einstein | Einstein | Darwin | Darwin | experiment | experiment | eugenics | eugenics | technology and society | technology and society | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology. This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology.

Subjects

relativity | relativity | special relativity | special relativity | Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | simultaneity | simultaneity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | relativistic invariants | relativistic invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | relativitistic particle collisions | relativitistic particle collisions | relativity and electricity | relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | general relativity | general relativity | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | gravitational | gravitational | red shift | red shift | light trajectories | light trajectories | geodesics | geodesics | Shapiro delay | Shapiro delay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.962 General Relativity (MIT) 8.962 General Relativity (MIT)

Description

8.962 is MIT's graduate course in general relativity, which covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity, differential geometry, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology. 8.962 is MIT's graduate course in general relativity, which covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity, differential geometry, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology.

Subjects

Spacetime | Spacetime | tensors | tensors | special relativity | special relativity | differential geometry | differential geometry | Einstein's equation | Einstein's equation | gravitation | gravitation | cosmological constant | cosmological constant | Hilbert action | Hilbert action | general relativity | general relativity | gravitational waves | gravitational waves | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | cosmology | cosmology | Schwarzschild solution | Schwarzschild solution | black holes | black holes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.20 Introduction to Special Relativity (MIT) 8.20 Introduction to Special Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the basic ideas and equations of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. If you have hoped to understand the physics of Lorentz contraction, time dilation, the "twin paradox", and E=mc2, you're in the right place.AcknowledgementsProf. Knuteson wishes to acknowledge that this course was originally designed and taught by Prof. Robert Jaffe. This course introduces the basic ideas and equations of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. If you have hoped to understand the physics of Lorentz contraction, time dilation, the "twin paradox", and E=mc2, you're in the right place.AcknowledgementsProf. Knuteson wishes to acknowledge that this course was originally designed and taught by Prof. Robert Jaffe.

Subjects

Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity | Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity | Lorentz transformations | Lorentz transformations | length contraction | length contraction | time dilation | time dilation | four vectors | four vectors | Lorentz invariants | Lorentz invariants | relativistic energy and momentum | relativistic energy and momentum | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | Doppler shift | Doppler shift | space-time diagrams | space-time diagrams | relativity paradoxes | relativity paradoxes | General Relativity | General Relativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.709 Studies in Literary History: Modernism: From Nietzsche to Fellini (MIT) 21L.709 Studies in Literary History: Modernism: From Nietzsche to Fellini (MIT)

Description

How do literature, philosophy, film and other arts respond to the profound changes in world view and lifestyle that mark the twentieth century? This course considers a broad range of works from different countries, different media, and different genres, in exploring the transition to a decentered "Einsteinian" universe. How do literature, philosophy, film and other arts respond to the profound changes in world view and lifestyle that mark the twentieth century? This course considers a broad range of works from different countries, different media, and different genres, in exploring the transition to a decentered "Einsteinian" universe.

Subjects

modernism | modernism | transition to a decentered “Einsteinian” universe | transition to a decentered “Einsteinian” universe | Friedrich Nietzsche | Friedrich Nietzsche | Paul Cézanne | Paul Cézanne | Arnold Schoenberg | Arnold Schoenberg | James Joyce | James Joyce | Franz Kafka | Franz Kafka | Fritz Lang | Fritz Lang | Federico Fellini | Federico Fellini | literary history | literary history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay. Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | particle trajectories | light trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | mass | mass | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | paradoxes | paradoxes | electricity | electricity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | geodesics | Shaprio delay | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | hubble expansion | universe | universe | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | curved space time | curved space time | Ether Theory | Ether Theory | constants | constants | speed of light | speed of light | c | c | graph | graph | pythagorem theorem | pythagorem theorem | triangle | triangle | arrows | arrows

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT) 6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT)

Description

6.728 covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. The course introduces applied quantum physics and  emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others. 6.728 covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. The course introduces applied quantum physics and  emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others.

Subjects

applied quantum physics | applied quantum physics | quantum physics | quantum physics | statistical physics | statistical physics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | Schrodinger | Schrodinger | tunneling | tunneling | harmonic oscillator | harmonic oscillator | hydrogen atom | hydrogen atom | variational methods | variational methods | Fermi-Dirac | Fermi-Dirac | Bose-Einstein | Bose-Einstein | Boltzmann | Boltzmann | distribution function | distribution function | electron microscope | electron microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | thermonic emitter | thermonic emitter | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT) 20.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental driving forces for transport—chemical gradients, electrical interactions, and fluid flow—as applied to the biology and biophysics of molecules, cells, and tissues. This course covers the fundamental driving forces for transport—chemical gradients, electrical interactions, and fluid flow—as applied to the biology and biophysics of molecules, cells, and tissues.

Subjects

diffusion | diffusion | molecular diffusion | molecular diffusion | diffusion-reaction | diffusion-reaction | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | biological systems | biological systems | fields | fields | electrical double layers | electrical double layers | Maxwell stress tensor | Maxwell stress tensor | physiological systems | physiological systems | fluid | fluid | solid | solid | equations of motion | equations of motion | case study | case study | electrode interfaces | electrode interfaces | transduction | transduction | random walk | random walk | Stokes-Einstein | Stokes-Einstein | Fick's laws | Fick's laws | reaction | reaction | Damköhler number | Damköhler number

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT) 6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT)

Description

6.728 is offered under the department's "Devices, Circuits, and Systems" concentration. The course covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics, introduces applied quantum physics, and emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others. 6.728 is offered under the department's "Devices, Circuits, and Systems" concentration. The course covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics, introduces applied quantum physics, and emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others.

Subjects

applied quantum physics | applied quantum physics | quantum physics | quantum physics | statistical physics | statistical physics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | Schrodinger | Schrodinger | tunneling | tunneling | harmonic oscillator | harmonic oscillator | hydrogen atom | hydrogen atom | variational methods | variational methods | Fermi-Dirac | Fermi-Dirac | Bose-Einstein | Bose-Einstein | Boltzmann | Boltzmann | distribution function | distribution function | electron microscope | electron microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | thermonic emitter | thermonic emitter | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.20 Introduction to Special Relativity (MIT) 8.20 Introduction to Special Relativity (MIT)

Description

Introduces the basic ideas and equations of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. Topics include: Lorentz transformations, length contraction and time dilation, four vectors, Lorentz invariants, relativistic energy and momentum, relativistic kinematics, Doppler shift, space-time diagrams, relativity paradoxes, and some concepts of General Relativity. Introduces the basic ideas and equations of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. Topics include: Lorentz transformations, length contraction and time dilation, four vectors, Lorentz invariants, relativistic energy and momentum, relativistic kinematics, Doppler shift, space-time diagrams, relativity paradoxes, and some concepts of General Relativity.

Subjects

Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity | Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity | Lorentz transformations | Lorentz transformations | length contraction | length contraction | ime dilation | ime dilation | time dilation | time dilation | four vectors | four vectors | Lorentz invariants | Lorentz invariants | relativistic energy and momentum | relativistic energy and momentum | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | Doppler shift | Doppler shift | space-time diagrams | space-time diagrams | relativity paradoxes | relativity paradoxes | General Relativity | General Relativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT) STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This class explores the changing roles of physics and physicists during the 20th century. Topics range from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to high-energy physics and cosmology. The course also examines the development of modern physics within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts, such as physics in Imperial Britain, Nazi Germany, U.S. efforts during World War II, and physicists' roles during the Cold War. This class explores the changing roles of physics and physicists during the 20th century. Topics range from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to high-energy physics and cosmology. The course also examines the development of modern physics within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts, such as physics in Imperial Britain, Nazi Germany, U.S. efforts during World War II, and physicists' roles during the Cold War.

Subjects

relativity theory | relativity theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | solid-state physics | solid-state physics | elementary particles | elementary particles | quarks | quarks | cosmology | cosmology | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | Maxwell | Maxwell | Mach | Mach | Poincar? | Poincar? | Bohr | Bohr | Heisenberg | Heisenberg | Schr?dinger | Schr?dinger | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | Einstein | Einstein | Planck | Planck | Feynman | Feynman | scientific frontiers | scientific frontiers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.709 Studies in Literary History: Modernism: From Nietzsche to Fellini (MIT)

Description

How do literature, philosophy, film and other arts respond to the profound changes in world view and lifestyle that mark the twentieth century? This course considers a broad range of works from different countries, different media, and different genres, in exploring the transition to a decentered "Einsteinian" universe.

Subjects

modernism | ?Einsteinian? universe | Friedrich Nietzsche | zanne | Arnold Schoenberg | James Joyce | Franz Kafka | Fritz Lang | Federico Fellini | literary history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.20 Introduction to Special Relativity (MIT)

Description

Introduces the basic ideas and equations of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. Topics include: Lorentz transformations, length contraction and time dilation, four vectors, Lorentz invariants, relativistic energy and momentum, relativistic kinematics, Doppler shift, space-time diagrams, relativity paradoxes, and some concepts of General Relativity.

Subjects

Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity | Lorentz transformations | length contraction | ime dilation | time dilation | four vectors | Lorentz invariants | relativistic energy and momentum | relativistic kinematics | Doppler shift | space-time diagrams | relativity paradoxes | General Relativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This class explores the changing roles of physics and physicists during the 20th century. Topics range from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to high-energy physics and cosmology. The course also examines the development of modern physics within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts, such as physics in Imperial Britain, Nazi Germany, U.S. efforts during World War II, and physicists' roles during the Cold War.

Subjects

relativity theory | quantum mechanics | solid-state physics | elementary particles | quarks | cosmology | nuclear weapons | Maxwell | Mach | Poincar? | Bohr | Heisenberg | Schr?dinger | McCarthyism | Einstein | Planck | Feynman | scientific frontiers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology.

Subjects

relativity | special relativity | Einstein's postulates | simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects | Minkowski diagrams | relativistic invariants | four-vectors | relativitistic particle collisions | relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | general relativity | Schwarzchild metric | gravitational | red shift | light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology | society | modern | seventeenth century | present | discovery | progress | history | physics | chemistry | biology | genetics | geology | medicine | psychology | computer science | race | ethics | scientific revolution | warfare | evolution | Freud | Einstein | Darwin | experiment | eugenics | technology and society | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental driving forces for transport—chemical gradients, electrical interactions, and fluid flow—as applied to the biology and biophysics of molecules, cells, and tissues.

Subjects

diffusion | molecular diffusion | diffusion-reaction | conduction | convection | biological systems | fields | electrical double layers | Maxwell stress tensor | physiological systems | fluid | solid | equations of motion | case study | electrode interfaces | transduction | random walk | Stokes-Einstein | Fick's laws | reaction | hler number

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course, which concentrates on special relativity, is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology.

Subjects

relativity | special relativity | Einstein's postulates | simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects | Minkowski diagrams | relativistic invariants | four-vectors | relativitistic particle collisions | relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | general relativity | Schwarzchild metric | gravitational | red shift | light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.962 General Relativity (MIT)

Description

8.962 is MIT's graduate course in general relativity, which covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity, differential geometry, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology.

Subjects

Spacetime | tensors | special relativity | differential geometry | Einstein's equation | gravitation | cosmological constant | Hilbert action | general relativity | gravitational waves | gravitational lensing | cosmology | Schwarzschild solution | black holes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Cosmología Hoy

Description

Subjects

agujeros negros | Albert Einstein | anixamandro | üedad

License

Creative Commons

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8.20 Introduction to Special Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the basic ideas and equations of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. If you have hoped to understand the physics of Lorentz contraction, time dilation, the "twin paradox", and E=mc2, you're in the right place.AcknowledgementsProf. Knuteson wishes to acknowledge that this course was originally designed and taught by Prof. Robert Jaffe.

Subjects

Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity | Lorentz transformations | length contraction | time dilation | four vectors | Lorentz invariants | relativistic energy and momentum | relativistic kinematics | Doppler shift | space-time diagrams | relativity paradoxes | General Relativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | four-vectors | momentum | energy | mass | relativistic effects | paradoxes | electricity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | universe | equivalence principle | curved space time | Ether Theory | constants | speed of light | c | graph | pythagorem theorem | triangle | arrows

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT)

Description

6.728 covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. The course introduces applied quantum physics and  emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others.

Subjects

applied quantum physics | quantum physics | statistical physics | quantum mechanics | Schrodinger | tunneling | harmonic oscillator | hydrogen atom | variational methods | Fermi-Dirac | Bose-Einstein | Boltzmann | distribution function | electron microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | thermonic emitter | atomic force microscope

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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