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The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine

Description

Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires. Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires.

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

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Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate

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The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

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Europe is no longer safe Europe is no longer safe

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The pillars of Europe’s security are damaged beyond repair and Europe’s leaders are in denial. Expect very heavy turbulence starting next year. The peaceful post-1989 order on the old continent rested on three key pillars: NATO, the EU, and the ruling mosaic of centre-left-and-right parties. NATO provided the hardware, the EU delivered the soft-ware, and the ruling parties offered legitimacy. All these three pillars are now damaged beyond repair. Donald Trump’s victory has buried NATO. Collective defence and deterrence can only work if they are not subject to speculation. Trump has made it clear that he wants to keep his options ... The pillars of Europe’s security are damaged beyond repair and Europe’s leaders are in denial. Expect very heavy turbulence starting next year. The peaceful post-1989 order on the old continent rested on three key pillars: NATO, the EU, and the ruling mosaic of centre-left-and-right parties. NATO provided the hardware, the EU delivered the soft-ware, and the ruling parties offered legitimacy. All these three pillars are now damaged beyond repair. Donald Trump’s victory has buried NATO. Collective defence and deterrence can only work if they are not subject to speculation. Trump has made it clear that he wants to keep his options ...

Subjects

The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | European security | European security | European Union | European Union | NATO | NATO | Trump | Trump

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test Brexit Buyers’ Remorse? Non, on ne bregrette rien test Brexit Buyers’ Remorse? Non, on ne bregrette rien

Description

The vote to leave the EU was an outcome which surprised most commentators, bookies, and even those who voted for the winning side. In the aftermath of the result, John Gray, a popular political theorist, wrote that ‘voters inflicted the biggest shock on the establishment since Churchill was ousted in 1945’. It is hard to think that he is wrong. The only social classes which predominately voted Remain were ABs (affluent and middle-class voters), whereas C1 C2 DE (lower middle-class and working-class) voters all delivered majorities for Leave. As I predicted on this blog in January and contrary to many ... The vote to leave the EU was an outcome which surprised most commentators, bookies, and even those who voted for the winning side. In the aftermath of the result, John Gray, a popular political theorist, wrote that ‘voters inflicted the biggest shock on the establishment since Churchill was ousted in 1945’. It is hard to think that he is wrong. The only social classes which predominately voted Remain were ABs (affluent and middle-class voters), whereas C1 C2 DE (lower middle-class and working-class) voters all delivered majorities for Leave. As I predicted on this blog in January and contrary to many ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | Law | Law | Political Science | Political Science | Political Theory | Political Theory | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | European Union | European Union | Immigration | Immigration | UK Immigration | UK Immigration

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Brexit and the Radical Tory Tradition of British Socialism Brexit and the Radical Tory Tradition of British Socialism

Description

In the spasms of defeat following the EU referendum, some Remain commentators have suggested that Brexit was a fundamentally racist choice. Indeed, one of the most forceful was Richard Elliot’s assertion on this blog that Brexit supporters are ‘the Cecil Rhodes of the twenty-first century’. Elliot’s article reflects the stifling academic consensus which cannot even comprehend how ‘good people’ could vote to Leave. This breathtakingly simplistic analysis amounts to little more than the assertion that clever, open-minded people voted to Remain whereas stupid, backward people voted to Leave. It echoes the debate over joining the Euro fifteen years ago when, ... In the spasms of defeat following the EU referendum, some Remain commentators have suggested that Brexit was a fundamentally racist choice. Indeed, one of the most forceful was Richard Elliot’s assertion on this blog that Brexit supporters are ‘the Cecil Rhodes of the twenty-first century’. Elliot’s article reflects the stifling academic consensus which cannot even comprehend how ‘good people’ could vote to Leave. This breathtakingly simplistic analysis amounts to little more than the assertion that clever, open-minded people voted to Remain whereas stupid, backward people voted to Leave. It echoes the debate over joining the Euro fifteen years ago when, ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Political Theory | Political Theory | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | European Union | European Union | Socialism | Socialism

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STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT) STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world. This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | complex interrelationships | complex interrelationships | humans | humans | natural environments | natural environments | conflict | conflict | access | access | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | knowledge | knowledge | biotechnology | biotechnology | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | environmental | environmental | stakes | stakes | forest | forest | agricultural | agricultural | marine | marine | urban | urban | cultural | cultural | historical | historical | power relationships | power relationships | local | local | national | national | international levels. nature | international levels. nature | European thought | European thought | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | ethnographic | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | North America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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n Europea (2011) n Europea (2011)

Description

Esta asignatura pretende que el alumno conozca, despus de la breve aproximacin a la misma que supone la asignatura Introduccin al Sistema Jurdico Internacional y de la Unin Europea (1 de Grado en Derecho), con mayor profundidad las instituciones que conforman la Unin Europea y las peculiariedades de su ordenamiento jurdico. La publicacin en el Portal OCW de la Universidad de Murcia tiene como fin que el alumno pueda acceder a una introduccin doctrinal breve en cada uno de los temas del programa, as como a materiales, textos de apoyo, cuestiones prcticas y curiosidades que le permitan saciar una curiosidad que no se puede alimentar ms all de los lmites que tiempo y espacio marcan. Esta asignatura pretende que el alumno conozca, despus de la breve aproximacin a la misma que supone la asignatura Introduccin al Sistema Jurdico Internacional y de la Unin Europea (1 de Grado en Derecho), con mayor profundidad las instituciones que conforman la Unin Europea y las peculiariedades de su ordenamiento jurdico. La publicacin en el Portal OCW de la Universidad de Murcia tiene como fin que el alumno pueda acceder a una introduccin doctrinal breve en cada uno de los temas del programa, as como a materiales, textos de apoyo, cuestiones prcticas y curiosidades que le permitan saciar una curiosidad que no se puede alimentar ms all de los lmites que tiempo y espacio marcan.

Subjects

n Europea | n Europea | cticas Unin Europea | cticas Unin Europea | blico y Relaciones Internacionales | blico y Relaciones Internacionales

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What explains Euroscepticism in the Conservative Party? What explains Euroscepticism in the Conservative Party?

Description

Many believe that the EU referendum has been called only to enable David Cameron to appease the Eurosceptics within his own party. This is debatable on numerous grounds. But what is certain is the eventuality that many Conservatives, including possibly some Cabinet ministers, will be joining the campaigns to get Britain out of the EU. For over a quarter of a century the issue of Britain’s role in Europe has been one of the most significant divisions within the Parliamentary Conservative Party (PCP). The European issue has been a reliable source of problems for the party leadership over the years. ... The post What explains Euroscepticism in the Conservative Party? appeared first on OxPol. Many believe that the EU referendum has been called only to enable David Cameron to appease the Eurosceptics within his own party. This is debatable on numerous grounds. But what is certain is the eventuality that many Conservatives, including possibly some Cabinet ministers, will be joining the campaigns to get Britain out of the EU. For over a quarter of a century the issue of Britain’s role in Europe has been one of the most significant divisions within the Parliamentary Conservative Party (PCP). The European issue has been a reliable source of problems for the party leadership over the years. ... The post What explains Euroscepticism in the Conservative Party? appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | brexit | brexit | Conservative Party | Conservative Party | Conservatives | Conservatives | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union

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The 1975 Referendum on Europe The 1975 Referendum on Europe

Description

The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (as it then was) on 1 January 1973 after negotiations by the Conservative government led by Edward Heath. In the run up to the subsequent 1974 General Election the Labour Party pledged, in its manifesto, the United Kingdom’s first nationwide referendum on whether to stay part of the Economic Community on renegotiated terms or to completely part company. With a Labour victory, the new Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, followed through on his promise and a referendum was held on 5 Jun 1975. The outcome was an overwhelming victory (67%) for the ‘In’ campaign. ... The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (as it then was) on 1 January 1973 after negotiations by the Conservative government led by Edward Heath. In the run up to the subsequent 1974 General Election the Labour Party pledged, in its manifesto, the United Kingdom’s first nationwide referendum on whether to stay part of the Economic Community on renegotiated terms or to completely part company. With a Labour victory, the new Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, followed through on his promise and a referendum was held on 5 Jun 1975. The outcome was an overwhelming victory (67%) for the ‘In’ campaign. ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | EU referendum | EU referendum | European Union | European Union

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The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe

Description

Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | inequality | inequality | Redistribution | Redistribution

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21A.342 Environmental Struggles (MIT) 21A.342 Environmental Struggles (MIT)

Description

This class explores the interrelationship between humans and natural environments. It does so by focusing on conflict over access to and use of the environment as well as ideas about "nature" in various parts of the world. This class explores the interrelationship between humans and natural environments. It does so by focusing on conflict over access to and use of the environment as well as ideas about "nature" in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | environment | environment | struggle | struggle | humans | humans | conflict | conflict | access | access | use | use | nature | nature | world | world | readings | readings | films | films | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | regulations | regulations | knowledge | knowledge | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | cultural | cultural | European thought | European thought | ethnographic | ethnographic | historical | historical | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | Latin America | Latin America | North America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips. This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Faust | Liszt | Liszt | Berlioz | Berlioz | Murnau | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | Turn of the Screw | magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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To be alive is to have hope To be alive is to have hope

Description

I traveled to the Calais migrant and refugee camp from March 14 to 16, together with a humanitarian student group from Brasenose College that collected donations and supplies to aid local NGOs with clothing and basic medical supplies. This article is based on my impressions of the camp and interviews with the migrants, refugees and NGO workers. The post To be alive is to have hope appeared first on OxPol. I traveled to the Calais migrant and refugee camp from March 14 to 16, together with a humanitarian student group from Brasenose College that collected donations and supplies to aid local NGOs with clothing and basic medical supplies. This article is based on my impressions of the camp and interviews with the migrants, refugees and NGO workers. The post To be alive is to have hope appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | Migration & Citizenship | Migration & Citizenship | Britain | Britain | Europe | Europe | France | France | Refugees | Refugees

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Exit, voice, and loyalty in Europe Exit, voice, and loyalty in Europe

Description

Complex situations often require us to take a step back for what consultants call the 10,000 feet view. The problems facing the EU these days—from Grexit to Brexit—surely seem impenetrable. A convoluted potpourri of economic, financial, and political crises leaves most observers either completely disengaged or increasingly reliant on their gut feelings. To wrap one's head around the forces that threaten the European project, it helps to think in very simple categories: exit, voice, and loyalty. Few theories still prompt real-life insights almost half a century after their publication. Albert O. Hirschman's "Exit, Voice, and Loyalty" surely falls into this category. Put simply, Hirschman postulated that members who are unsatisfied with an organization they are part of, can either ex Complex situations often require us to take a step back for what consultants call the 10,000 feet view. The problems facing the EU these days—from Grexit to Brexit—surely seem impenetrable. A convoluted potpourri of economic, financial, and political crises leaves most observers either completely disengaged or increasingly reliant on their gut feelings. To wrap one's head around the forces that threaten the European project, it helps to think in very simple categories: exit, voice, and loyalty. Few theories still prompt real-life insights almost half a century after their publication. Albert O. Hirschman's "Exit, Voice, and Loyalty" surely falls into this category. Put simply, Hirschman postulated that members who are unsatisfied with an organization they are part of, can either ex

Subjects

European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | International Relations | International Relations | Law | Law | Political Economy | Political Economy | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics

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n al Sistema Jurdico Internacional y de la Unin Europea (2012) n al Sistema Jurdico Internacional y de la Unin Europea (2012)

Description

La asignatura pretende ofrecer al alumno que por primera vez se enfrenta al mundo del Derecho una aproximacin al Derecho internacional Pblico contemporneo as como a la Unin Europea y su Ordenamiento Jurdico. Se trata de dos manifestaciones jurdicas muy distintas a las que los alumnos del Ttulo de Grado van a estudiar en las distintas ramas del Derecho interno espaol, pero que al mismo tiempo tienen en este un grado de penetracin cada vez ms importante. La disciplina est por tanto relacionada con el Derecho Internacional Pblico (incluida entre las materias bsicas con 6 ECTS) y con la asignatura Instituciones y Derecho de la Unin Europea (obligatoria, 6 ECTS) y con la Unin Europea como actor principal de las Relaciones Internacionales (optativa, 3 ECTS) que h La asignatura pretende ofrecer al alumno que por primera vez se enfrenta al mundo del Derecho una aproximacin al Derecho internacional Pblico contemporneo as como a la Unin Europea y su Ordenamiento Jurdico. Se trata de dos manifestaciones jurdicas muy distintas a las que los alumnos del Ttulo de Grado van a estudiar en las distintas ramas del Derecho interno espaol, pero que al mismo tiempo tienen en este un grado de penetracin cada vez ms importante. La disciplina est por tanto relacionada con el Derecho Internacional Pblico (incluida entre las materias bsicas con 6 ECTS) y con la asignatura Instituciones y Derecho de la Unin Europea (obligatoria, 6 ECTS) y con la Unin Europea como actor principal de las Relaciones Internacionales (optativa, 3 ECTS) que h

Subjects

n Europea | n Europea | blico | blico | n de Naciones Unidas | n de Naciones Unidas | Responsabilidad internacional | Responsabilidad internacional | blico y Relaciones Internacionales | blico y Relaciones Internacionales | Fuentes del Derecho Internacional | Fuentes del Derecho Internacional | sicos de Derecho Internacional | sicos de Derecho Internacional | n Europea y Derecho Espaol | n Europea y Derecho Espaol | Sujetos de Derecho Internacional | Sujetos de Derecho Internacional

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Introduction to the medieval world, 500-1500 Introduction to the medieval world, 500-1500

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010 Most history students, when applying to university, say they want to widen their knowledge of the past. As a School we take you at your word, teaching history from AD 500 onwards. This module introduces you to Europe in the Middle Ages (500-1500), a period in which Nottingham University has a distinguished tradition, built up by Jim Holt, Donald Bullough, Robert Markus, Bernard Hamilton and Michael Jones, and continued, we hope, by ourselves. The period covered by the module runs from the end of the Roman Empire in the west to the Renaissance. The legacy of this period is still with us: disputed notions of what constitutes European ‘unity’; profound divisions between West This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010 Most history students, when applying to university, say they want to widen their knowledge of the past. As a School we take you at your word, teaching history from AD 500 onwards. This module introduces you to Europe in the Middle Ages (500-1500), a period in which Nottingham University has a distinguished tradition, built up by Jim Holt, Donald Bullough, Robert Markus, Bernard Hamilton and Michael Jones, and continued, we hope, by ourselves. The period covered by the module runs from the end of the Roman Empire in the west to the Renaissance. The legacy of this period is still with us: disputed notions of what constitutes European ‘unity’; profound divisions between West

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | history | history | Module Code: V11219 | Module Code: V11219 | Medieval world | Medieval world | AD 500 onwards | AD 500 onwards | Europe in the Middle Ages (500-1500) | Europe in the Middle Ages (500-1500) | Roman Empire | Roman Empire | Renaissance | Renaissance | Christian and non-Christian cultures | Christian and non-Christian cultures | European history | European history

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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17.508 The Rise and Fall of Democracy/ Regime Change (MIT) 17.508 The Rise and Fall of Democracy/ Regime Change (MIT)

Description

Coups, civil wars, revolutions, and peaceful transitions are the "real stuff" of political science. They show us why politics matters, and they highlight the consequences of political choices in times of institutional crisis. This course will help you understand why democracies emerge and why they die, from ancient times to the recent wave of democratization in Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and the developing world. Few things are more dramatic than the collapse of a political system, whether through violent conflict or the peaceful negotiation of new political institutions. Explaining why regimes break down, why new ones emerge, and how these new regimes are consolidated are among the most important questions in political science. Not surprisingly, regime change has obsessed scholars Coups, civil wars, revolutions, and peaceful transitions are the "real stuff" of political science. They show us why politics matters, and they highlight the consequences of political choices in times of institutional crisis. This course will help you understand why democracies emerge and why they die, from ancient times to the recent wave of democratization in Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and the developing world. Few things are more dramatic than the collapse of a political system, whether through violent conflict or the peaceful negotiation of new political institutions. Explaining why regimes break down, why new ones emerge, and how these new regimes are consolidated are among the most important questions in political science. Not surprisingly, regime change has obsessed scholars

Subjects

Coups | Coups | Civil war | Civil war | Revolutions | Revolutions | Institutional crisis | Institutional crisis | Democratization | Democratization | Southern Europe | Southern Europe | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | Developing world | Developing world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The impact of globalisation The impact of globalisation

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. Globalisation has been widely debated in International Political Economy. This module has the task to assess its impact on European politics and integration. First, various definitions of globalisation will be introduced, before its impact on individual European countries and the European Union as a whole is analysed. Is there a general institutional and policy convergence of states due to globalisation, or do states respond in different ways? Does globalisation leave room for alternative economic-political models? Is European integration a defensive response to globalisation or simply part and parcel of the processes of global structural change? What are the likely characteri This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. Globalisation has been widely debated in International Political Economy. This module has the task to assess its impact on European politics and integration. First, various definitions of globalisation will be introduced, before its impact on individual European countries and the European Union as a whole is analysed. Is there a general institutional and policy convergence of states due to globalisation, or do states respond in different ways? Does globalisation leave room for alternative economic-political models? Is European integration a defensive response to globalisation or simply part and parcel of the processes of global structural change? What are the likely characteri

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code:M13025 | Module Code:M13025 | Globalisation | Globalisation | International Political Economy | International Political Economy | European politics | European politics | European Union | European Union | institutional and policy convergence of states | institutional and policy convergence of states | future economic-political model of the EU | future economic-political model of the EU

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Transatlantic security relations Transatlantic security relations

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As As taught Autumn Semester 2010. The module will investigate some of the key issues that have characterised transatlantic security cooperation since 1990. The module will focus on issues that relate to the security of the European continent as well as to matters of global concern. Educational Aims This module aims to: Give students an understanding of the development in US-European security relations since 1990. An awareness of the post-Cold War debates surrounding security issues both inside and outside of Europe. Develop a subject specific knowledge of transatlantic security relations. Encourage students to read widely in the literature on transatlantic relations. Enable students to critically This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As As taught Autumn Semester 2010. The module will investigate some of the key issues that have characterised transatlantic security cooperation since 1990. The module will focus on issues that relate to the security of the European continent as well as to matters of global concern. Educational Aims This module aims to: Give students an understanding of the development in US-European security relations since 1990. An awareness of the post-Cold War debates surrounding security issues both inside and outside of Europe. Develop a subject specific knowledge of transatlantic security relations. Encourage students to read widely in the literature on transatlantic relations. Enable students to critically

Subjects

UNow | UNow | transatlantic security cooperation | transatlantic security cooperation | US-European security relations | US-European security relations | post-Cold War debates | post-Cold War debates | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code:M13018 | Module Code:M13018 | The Transformation of NATO | The Transformation of NATO | Developing a European Defence Identity | Developing a European Defence Identity | Transatlantic Cooperation in the ‘War Against Terrorism’ | Transatlantic Cooperation in the ‘War Against Terrorism’ | Nuclear Proliferation and Counter-Proliferation: North Korea | Nuclear Proliferation and Counter-Proliferation: North Korea | ‘States of Concern’ | ‘States of Concern’

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Olympic Games and Eastern Europe

Description

This case study considers how the Olympic stage has been utilised as a key arena for the expression of competing dominant political ideologies in modern history.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | The Olympics and Eastern Europe | Western Europe | Eastern Europe | doping | drugs | East Germany | Russia | Olympic Boycotts | Melbourne 1956 | Melbourne | Soviet invasion of Afghanistan | Afghanistan | Moscow | Moscow 1980 | Sochi 2014 | Sochi bid | Sochi | investment | funding | finance | protest | boycott | politics | political issues | conflict | oxb:060111:013cs | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | The Olympics Impact and Legacy

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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Olympic Games and Eastern Europe

Description

This case study considers how the Olympic stage has been utilised as a key arena for the expression of competing dominant political ideologies in modern history.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | The Olympics and Eastern Europe | Western Europe | Eastern Europe | doping | drugs | East Germany | Russia | Olympic Boycotts | Melbourne 1956 | Melbourne | Soviet invasion of Afghanistan | Afghanistan | Moscow | Moscow 1980 | Sochi 2014 | Sochi bid | Sochi | investment | funding | finance | protest | boycott | politics | political issues | conflict | oxb:060111:013cs | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | The Olympics Impact and Legacy

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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?s Common European Asylum System

Description

Public Seminar Series Trinity term 2014. Madeline Garlick (Radboud University). Recorded on 14 May 2014 at the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. Madeline Garlick is a Guest Researcher and PhD candidate at the Centre for Migration Law at Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. She is also an International Migration Initiative (IMI) Fellow with the Open Society Foundations, working in 2014 on an asylum project with Migration Policy Institute Europe. She was previously Head of the Policy and Legal Support Unit in the Bureau for Europe of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and responsible for UNHCR?s liaison to the EU institutions from 2004-2013. She served with the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

refugees | asylum | european union | Common European Asylum System | refugees | asylum | european union | Common European Asylum System | 2014-05-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Brexit and the Anti-Elite Era Brexit and the Anti-Elite Era

Description

The result of the UK referendum on EU membership was an act of rejection of elite opinion. Almost the entirety of the country’s intellectual, economic and political establishment had explicitly opposed Brexit. There had been letters by Nobel laureates detailing the cost to UK research of a ‘Leave’ vote, a public statement by over 250 academics to the same affect, the official opposition of most British businesses as well as an avalanche of expert reports indicating the significant economic cost of leaving the world’s largest single market. In political terms, the ‘Remain’ campaign had the formal support of the country’s four ... The result of the UK referendum on EU membership was an act of rejection of elite opinion. Almost the entirety of the country’s intellectual, economic and political establishment had explicitly opposed Brexit. There had been letters by Nobel laureates detailing the cost to UK research of a ‘Leave’ vote, a public statement by over 250 academics to the same affect, the official opposition of most British businesses as well as an avalanche of expert reports indicating the significant economic cost of leaving the world’s largest single market. In political terms, the ‘Remain’ campaign had the formal support of the country’s four ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | brexit | brexit | European Union | European Union | Globalisation | Globalisation | Immigration | Immigration | populism | populism

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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’s new right wing

Description

While political parties promoting national liberal, conservative and Euro-sceptic positions have experienced a rise in nearly all EU member states over the past years, Germany appeared to be the last safe-haven left. However, this German exception seems to be over. Since last September the Alternative für Deutschland (Alternative for Germany, AfD) has entered three regional parliaments within two weeks, living up to its success in this year’s European elections. Supported by around 10 per cent of the voters, the AfD poses a problem to the Christian Democratic Christian Democratic Union (CDU)/Christian Social Union (CSU) and, especially, to the liberal Free Democratic Party (FDP). They have to fear the establishment of a party which may challenge their dominance over Germany’s politica

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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