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Reenactment : fans performing movie scenes from the stage to YouTube Reenactment : fans performing movie scenes from the stage to YouTube

Description

In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Workshops, Professor Barbara Klinger from Indiana University discusses her research on the phenomenon of fan recreations. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor Barbara Klinger, Indiana University Professor Barbara Klinger's research and teaching focus on U.S. cinema, film exhibition and reception, fan studies, cinema and new media, film and convergence culture, media theory and criticism, and gender studies. She is currently working on two book projects: Becoming Classic: Hollywood Cinema, Television Exhibition, and Popular Canons/and Reenactment: Fans Performing Movies, from Theater to Youtube. In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Workshops, Professor Barbara Klinger from Indiana University discusses her research on the phenomenon of fan recreations. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor Barbara Klinger, Indiana University Professor Barbara Klinger's research and teaching focus on U.S. cinema, film exhibition and reception, fan studies, cinema and new media, film and convergence culture, media theory and criticism, and gender studies. She is currently working on two book projects: Becoming Classic: Hollywood Cinema, Television Exhibition, and Popular Canons/and Reenactment: Fans Performing Movies, from Theater to Youtube.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Ephemeral Media | Ephemeral Media | Humanities | Humanities | Film and Television Studies | Film and Television Studies | New Media | New Media | Film and Media | Film and Media | Fans | Fans | Film Reenactment | Film Reenactment | YouTube | YouTube | Fan Recreations | Fan Recreations | Fan studies | Fan studies | UKOER | UKOER

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Weimar Cinema

Description

Videorecording and slides from Jason Lieblang's lecture on Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Murnau's Nosferatu, and Lang's Dr. Mabuse, The Gambler.

Subjects

Jason Lieblang | lecture | powerpoint | Seeing and Knowing | video | Cabinet of Dr. Caligari | Caligari | Dr. Mabuse | Film | German Films | Grune | Lang | Murnau | Nosferatu | Weimar Films | Wiene

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User-generated content : archeologies, economies and ecologies User-generated content : archeologies, economies and ecologies

Description

Jon is a leading researcher in the field of interactive media and gaming and spent the first 15 years of his working life in video production, working through the early years of Channel Four as a researcher, editor and eventually as Producer. He worked principally in documentary and experimental video, co founding original scratch artists Gorilla Tapes in 1984. His video projects gained international distribution and recognition and have now taken their place in the documented histories of UK Video Art. After moving to Bristol in 1990 he worked at the Watershed Media Centre for two years before teaching at the University of Plymouth in 1992 and then at both the University of the West of England School of Cultural Studies and the University of Bristol. As Head of the Department of Drama at Jon is a leading researcher in the field of interactive media and gaming and spent the first 15 years of his working life in video production, working through the early years of Channel Four as a researcher, editor and eventually as Producer. He worked principally in documentary and experimental video, co founding original scratch artists Gorilla Tapes in 1984. His video projects gained international distribution and recognition and have now taken their place in the documented histories of UK Video Art. After moving to Bristol in 1990 he worked at the Watershed Media Centre for two years before teaching at the University of Plymouth in 1992 and then at both the University of the West of England School of Cultural Studies and the University of Bristol. As Head of the Department of Drama at In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media workshops, Professor Jon Dovey (UWE) presents his research into user-generated content. PLEASE NOTE: The presntation begins with a five minute video clip - keynote begins thereafter. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Professor Jon Dovey, University of the West of England Jon has recently been appointed to the new Faculty of Creative Arts at University of the West of England with a view to raising the profile of media research there. The vehicle for this will be the Digital Cultures Research Centre, interfacing industry and academia, based at the Pervasive Media Studio. Jon is a leading researcher in In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media workshops, Professor Jon Dovey (UWE) presents his research into user-generated content. PLEASE NOTE: The presntation begins with a five minute video clip - keynote begins thereafter. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Professor Jon Dovey, University of the West of England Jon has recently been appointed to the new Faculty of Creative Arts at University of the West of England with a view to raising the profile of media research there. The vehicle for this will be the Digital Cultures Research Centre, interfacing industry and academia, based at the Pervasive Media Studio. Jon is a leading researcher in

Subjects

UNow | UNow | User-generated Content | User-generated Content | Emphemeral Media | Emphemeral Media | Humanities | Humanities | Film and Television Studies | Film and Television Studies | New Media | New Media | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT) 21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Truffaut. This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Truffaut.

Subjects

Film history | Film history | American culture | American culture | Hollywood | Hollywood | Fred Ott | Fred Ott | Early film | Early film | Griffith | Griffith | Keaton | Keaton | Chaplin | Chaplin | Renoir | Renoir | Ford | Ford | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Altman | Altman | De Sica | De Sica | Truffaut | Truffaut

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.343 Photography and Related Media (MIT) 4.343 Photography and Related Media (MIT)

Description

Subject combines practical instruction, readings, lectures, field trips, visiting artists, group discussions, and individual reviews. Fosters a critical awareness of how images in our culture are produced and constructed. Student-initiated term project at the core of exploration. Special consideration given to the relationship of space and the photographic image. Practical instruction in basic black and white techniques, digital imaging, fundamentals of camera operation, lighting, film exposure, development, and printing. Open to beginning and advanced students. Lab fee. Enrollment limited with preference given to current Master of Architecture students. Subject combines practical instruction, readings, lectures, field trips, visiting artists, group discussions, and individual reviews. Fosters a critical awareness of how images in our culture are produced and constructed. Student-initiated term project at the core of exploration. Special consideration given to the relationship of space and the photographic image. Practical instruction in basic black and white techniques, digital imaging, fundamentals of camera operation, lighting, film exposure, development, and printing. Open to beginning and advanced students. Lab fee. Enrollment limited with preference given to current Master of Architecture students.

Subjects

Visual | Visual | Arts | Arts | Visual Arts Program | Visual Arts Program | VAP | VAP | Basic Black and White Techniques | Basic Black and White Techniques | Digital Imaging | Digital Imaging | Fundamentals of Camera Operation | Fundamentals of Camera Operation | Lighting | Lighting | Film Exposure | Film Exposure | Printing | Printing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.052 French Film Classics (MIT) 21G.052 French Film Classics (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history and aesthetics of French cinema from the advent of sound to present-day. It treats films in the context of technical processes, the art of narration, directorial style, role of the scriptwriter, the development of schools and movements, the impact of political events and ideologies, and the relation between French and other national cinemas. Taught in English, the films are screened with English subtitles. Students may complete written assignments in French. This course covers the history and aesthetics of French cinema from the advent of sound to present-day. It treats films in the context of technical processes, the art of narration, directorial style, role of the scriptwriter, the development of schools and movements, the impact of political events and ideologies, and the relation between French and other national cinemas. Taught in English, the films are screened with English subtitles. Students may complete written assignments in French.

Subjects

France | France | french film | french film | the new wave | the new wave | René Clair | René Clair | Jean Epstein | Jean Epstein | La Grande Illusion | La Grande Illusion | Jean Renoir | Jean Renoir | The Left Bank | The Left Bank | 1970s Sex and Sectarianism | 1970s Sex and Sectarianism | Les Valseuses | Les Valseuses | Bertrand Blier | Bertrand Blier | Diva | Diva | Jean-Jacques Beineix | Jean-Jacques Beineix | cult film | cult film | cult classic | cult classic | Maghrebi-French (Beur) | Maghrebi-French (Beur) | Amélie | Amélie | popular Film | popular Film | Cluzot | Cluzot | Le corbeau | Le corbeau | Funny Face | Funny Face | Stanley Donen | Stanley Donen | Jacques Cousteau | Jacques Cousteau | BarthesCésaire | BarthesCésaire | Roger Vadim | Roger Vadim | François Truffaut | François Truffaut | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Breathless: Jean-Luc Godard | Breathless: Jean-Luc Godard | Les Aventures de Rabbi Jacob | Les Aventures de Rabbi Jacob | Gérard Oury | Gérard Oury | Nikita | Nikita | Jean-Luc Besson | Jean-Luc Besson | La Haine | La Haine | Mattheiu Kassovitz | Mattheiu Kassovitz | Intouchables | Intouchables | Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache | Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache | Bande de filles | Bande de filles | Céline Sciamma | Céline Sciamma | Realism | Realism | the Popular Frot | the Popular Frot | Liberation | Liberation | Henri Langlois and the Cinémathèque française | Henri Langlois and the Cinémathèque française | Les parapluies de Cherboug | Les parapluies de Cherboug | Jacques Demy | Jacques Demy | Brigitte Bardot | Brigitte Bardot | Catherine Deneuve | Catherine Deneuve

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT) 21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium. This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Practice | Practice | Non-linear | Non-linear | Interactive | Interactive | Narrative | Narrative | Film | Film | Writing | Writing | Games | Games | Web | Web | HTML | HTML | Multilinear | Multilinear | Story | Story | creative writing | creative writing | computers | computers | book-based narratives | book-based narratives | structure | structure | digression | digression | multiple points of view | multiple points of view | storyline | storyline | hypertexts | hypertexts | adventure games | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | eliza | modeling | modeling | computer-based narratives | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.209 Philosophy In Film and Other Media (MIT) 24.209 Philosophy In Film and Other Media (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines works of film in relation to thematic issues of philosophical importance that also occur in other arts, particularly literature and opera. Emphasis is put on film's ability to represent and express feeling as well as cognition. Both written and cinematic works by Sturges, Shaw, Cocteau, Hitchcock, Joyce, and Bergman, among others, are considered. There are no tests or quizzes, however students write two major papers on media/philosophical research topics of their choosing. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines works of film in relation to thematic issues of philosophical importance that also occur in other arts, particularly literature and opera. Emphasis is put on film's ability to represent and express feeling as well as cognition. Both written and cinematic works by Sturges, Shaw, Cocteau, Hitchcock, Joyce, and Bergman, among others, are considered. There are no tests or quizzes, however students write two major papers on media/philosophical research topics of their choosing.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Narrative | Narrative | Linguistics | Linguistics | Literature | Literature | Opera | Opera | Feeling | Feeling | Cognition | Cognition | Arts | Arts | Thematic | Thematic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT) 21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define 'non-linearity/multi-linearity', 'interactivity', 'narrative'. To what extend are these aspect This course explores the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define 'non-linearity/multi-linearity', 'interactivity', 'narrative'. To what extend are these aspect

Subjects

Narrative | Narrative | Interactive | Interactive | Non-Linear | Non-Linear | Multi-Linear | Multi-Linear | Digital | Digital | Print | Print | Media | Media | Talmud | Talmud | Novel | Novel | Literature | Literature | Film | Film | Games | Games | Storyline | Storyline | Text | Text | Story | Story | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489 | CMS.845 | CMS.845

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT) 21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium. This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Practice | Practice | Non-linear | Non-linear | Interactive | Interactive | Narrative | Narrative | Film | Film | Writing | Writing | Games | Games | Web | Web | HTML | HTML | Multilinear | Multilinear | Story | Story | creative writing | creative writing | computers | computers | book-based narratives | book-based narratives | structure | structure | digression | digression | multiple points of view | multiple points of view | storyline | storyline | hypertexts | hypertexts | adventure games | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | eliza | modeling | modeling | computer-based narratives | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Film in history/history in film Film in history/history in film

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009 This module explores the inter-relations and interactions of film and history in 20th century Europe and the United States (with a few classic films from elsewhere). It considers how films have appropriated past events as their core subject matter or setting, for purposes of nostalgic entertainment or didactic drama, for social commentary, philosophical enquiry or political protest and examines how historical films have shaped popular knowledge and popular cultures of history, how they have contributed to forming or reforming collective memories and how, at times, they have catalysed social or political change. This module raises challenging questions about the constitution This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009 This module explores the inter-relations and interactions of film and history in 20th century Europe and the United States (with a few classic films from elsewhere). It considers how films have appropriated past events as their core subject matter or setting, for purposes of nostalgic entertainment or didactic drama, for social commentary, philosophical enquiry or political protest and examines how historical films have shaped popular knowledge and popular cultures of history, how they have contributed to forming or reforming collective memories and how, at times, they have catalysed social or political change. This module raises challenging questions about the constitution

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Film | Film | History | History | Cinema | Cinema | Culture | Culture | Social Memory | Social Memory | Collective Memory | Collective Memory | Social History | Social History

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Industry perspectives in media branding and promotion Industry perspectives in media branding and promotion

Description

In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Workshops Charlie Mawer from Red Bee Media, discusses his company's work on the branding and promotion of television channels; from BBC channels through to new channels like Dave. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for undergraduate study and community education Charlie Mawer, Executive Creative Director, Red Bee Media Charlie Mawer, after a spell of writing comedy, joined a fledgling BBC creative department eventually becoming Executive Creative Director. In 2005 he helped transform the company into Red Bee Media. Since then he has overseen high profile work including the rebranding of BBC1, BBC3, Virgin1 and the network rebranding of UKTV including the IPA gold winning c In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Workshops Charlie Mawer from Red Bee Media, discusses his company's work on the branding and promotion of television channels; from BBC channels through to new channels like Dave. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for undergraduate study and community education Charlie Mawer, Executive Creative Director, Red Bee Media Charlie Mawer, after a spell of writing comedy, joined a fledgling BBC creative department eventually becoming Executive Creative Director. In 2005 he helped transform the company into Red Bee Media. Since then he has overseen high profile work including the rebranding of BBC1, BBC3, Virgin1 and the network rebranding of UKTV including the IPA gold winning c

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Ephemeral Media | Ephemeral Media | Film and Television Studies | Film and Television Studies | Humanities | Humanities | Media Branding | Media Branding | Media Promotion | Media Promotion | New Media | New Media | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Machinima Machinima

Description

In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Conference, Hugh Hancock from The Strange Company gives industry insights into the world of Machinima and its role in the world of media ephemerality, and shows examples of his work. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Hugh Hancock, Artistic Director, Strange Company Hugh Hancock co-founded the Strange Company in 1997 which is the world's oldest pro 'Machinima' production company, making films in 3D virtual worlds to tell stories that couldn't be told any other way. Hugh Hancock and Gordon McDonald have produced award-winning independent films (including the feature-length 'BloodSpell') as well as In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Conference, Hugh Hancock from The Strange Company gives industry insights into the world of Machinima and its role in the world of media ephemerality, and shows examples of his work. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Hugh Hancock, Artistic Director, Strange Company Hugh Hancock co-founded the Strange Company in 1997 which is the world's oldest pro 'Machinima' production company, making films in 3D virtual worlds to tell stories that couldn't be told any other way. Hugh Hancock and Gordon McDonald have produced award-winning independent films (including the feature-length 'BloodSpell') as well as

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Ephemeral Media | Ephemeral Media | Animation | Animation | Computer Generated Animation | Computer Generated Animation | Film and Television Studies | Film and Television Studies | Humanities | Humanities | New Media | New Media | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21G.702 Spanish II (MIT) 21G.702 Spanish II (MIT)

Description

Spanish II continues to develop students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using the second part of the video-based program, Destinos, begun in Spanish I. Destinos is a soap opera that allows students to learn Spanish and experience its cultural diversity while following a good story full of surprises and human emotions. Spanish II also includes additional materials, such as Spanish films and other media, various types of reading selections and online resources. Spanish II continues to develop students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using the second part of the video-based program, Destinos, begun in Spanish I. Destinos is a soap opera that allows students to learn Spanish and experience its cultural diversity while following a good story full of surprises and human emotions. Spanish II also includes additional materials, such as Spanish films and other media, various types of reading selections and online resources.

Subjects

Spanish | Spanish | Language | Language | Foreign | Foreign | Understand | Understand | Speak | Speak | Read | Read | Fluency | Fluency | Destinos | Destinos | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Film | Film | Media | Media | grammar | grammar | vocabulary | vocabulary | reading | reading | writing | writing | speaking | speaking | listening comprehension | listening comprehension | espanol | espanol | 21F.702 | 21F.702 | 21F.752 | 21F.752

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The recurrent, the recombinatory and the ephemeral : thoughts on a textual system in transition The recurrent, the recombinatory and the ephemeral : thoughts on a textual system in transition

Description

In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Workshops, Professor William Uricchio discusses his research: The recurrent, recombinatory and the ephemeral: thoughts on a textual system in transition. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor William Uricchio, MIT/Utrecht William Uricchio is Professor and Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program and professor of Comparative Media History at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. He has held visiting professorships at Stockholm University, the University of Science and Technology of China, the Freie Universität Berlin, and Philips Universität Marburg; and Guggenheim, Fulbright and Humboldt fellowships have In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Workshops, Professor William Uricchio discusses his research: The recurrent, recombinatory and the ephemeral: thoughts on a textual system in transition. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor William Uricchio, MIT/Utrecht William Uricchio is Professor and Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program and professor of Comparative Media History at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. He has held visiting professorships at Stockholm University, the University of Science and Technology of China, the Freie Universität Berlin, and Philips Universität Marburg; and Guggenheim, Fulbright and Humboldt fellowships have

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Humanities | Humanities | Ephemeral Media | Ephemeral Media | New Media | New Media | Film and Television Studies | Film and Television Studies | Media History | Media History | Media in Transition | Media in Transition | Media Cultures | Media Cultures | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture Nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn/Spring Semesters 2009/2010 This resource presents material from four different courses taught across the School of American and Canadian Studies and Film and Television Studies. It addresses various aspects of nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture. You can view module outlines for 4 modules taught within the school: * American Drama (undergraduate year 3 level) * American Sensations (undergraduate year 3 level) * Film History (undergraduate year 1 level) * Emergence of Mass Culture (undergraduate year 2 level) The information contained within the module outlines includes: module objectives, lecture schedules, reading lists, teaching and l This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn/Spring Semesters 2009/2010 This resource presents material from four different courses taught across the School of American and Canadian Studies and Film and Television Studies. It addresses various aspects of nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture. You can view module outlines for 4 modules taught within the school: * American Drama (undergraduate year 3 level) * American Sensations (undergraduate year 3 level) * Film History (undergraduate year 1 level) * Emergence of Mass Culture (undergraduate year 2 level) The information contained within the module outlines includes: module objectives, lecture schedules, reading lists, teaching and l

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | American and canadian studies | American and canadian studies | Film and television studies | Film and television studies | Sensational novels 1850 | Sensational novels 1850 | Mass market magazines 1900 | Mass market magazines 1900 | Movie palaces 1920 | Movie palaces 1920 | Depession-era theatre 1930 | Depession-era theatre 1930 | Media studies | Media studies | American literature | American literature | Amercian society and culture | Amercian society and culture

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.702 Spanish II (MIT)

Description

Spanish II continues to develop students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using the second part of the video-based program, Destinos, begun in Spanish I. Destinos is a soap opera that allows students to learn Spanish and experience its cultural diversity while following a good story full of surprises and human emotions. Spanish II also includes additional materials, such as Spanish films and other media, various types of reading selections and online resources.

Subjects

Spanish | Language | Foreign | Understand | Speak | Read | Fluency | Destinos | Culture | Diversity | Film | Media | grammar | vocabulary | reading | writing | speaking | listening comprehension | espanol

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.343 Photography and Related Media (MIT)

Description

Subject combines practical instruction, readings, lectures, field trips, visiting artists, group discussions, and individual reviews. Fosters a critical awareness of how images in our culture are produced and constructed. Student-initiated term project at the core of exploration. Special consideration given to the relationship of space and the photographic image. Practical instruction in basic black and white techniques, digital imaging, fundamentals of camera operation, lighting, film exposure, development, and printing. Open to beginning and advanced students. Lab fee. Enrollment limited with preference given to current Master of Architecture students.

Subjects

Visual | Arts | Visual Arts Program | VAP | Basic Black and White Techniques | Digital Imaging | Fundamentals of Camera Operation | Lighting | Film Exposure | Printing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define 'non-linearity/multi-linearity', 'interactivity', 'narrative'. To what extend are these aspect

Subjects

Narrative | Interactive | Non-Linear | Multi-Linear | Digital | Print | Media | Talmud | Novel | Literature | Film | Games | Storyline | Text | Story | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | CMS.845

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Practice | Non-linear | Interactive | Narrative | Film | Writing | Games | Web | HTML | Multilinear | Story | creative writing | computers | book-based narratives | structure | digression | multiple points of view | storyline | hypertexts | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | modeling | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Arts and Society

Description

This learning package contains: Teacher Notes; a set of 10 online tasks; a complete reading and viewing list; and some suggestions for classroom activities. The 10 online tasks contain approximately 20 hours of materials for independent and collaborative learning. They include: reflective questions with feedback,list of resources with recommended readings and viewings, links to video clips, online discussion forums and walls.

Subjects

Arts | Society | Semiotics | Marxism | Feminism | Dance | Film | CCCEED | creativity | digital engagement | JISC digitisation and content

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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