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4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT) 4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling. This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | video recording | video recording | editing | editing | self-exploration | self-exploration | performance | performance | social critique | social critique | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | narrative | narrative | abstract | abstract | documentary | documentary | essay | essay | video capture | video capture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT) 4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT)

Description

This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure. This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | story trajectory | story trajectory | character development | character development | verisimilitude | verisimilitude | time-space continuity | time-space continuity | viewer identification | viewer identification | suspension of disbelief | suspension of disbelief | closure | closure | narrative cinema | narrative cinema | speculative biography | speculative biography | conceptual video | conceptual video | the fake | the fake | the remake | the remake | domestic ethnography | domestic ethnography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 27: Games as Art Lecture 27: Games as Art

Description

Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

aesthetics | aesthetics | postmodernism | postmodernism | social commentary | social commentary | abstraction | abstraction | performance art | performance art | Yoko Ono | Yoko Ono | simulation | simulation | Fluxus | Fluxus | event score | event score | interactive art | interactive art | fine art | fine art | representation | representation | virtual economy | virtual economy | satire | satire | geocaching | geocaching | alternative reality games | alternative reality games | art games | art games | pop culture | pop culture | video games | video games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 27: Games as Art

Description

Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

aesthetics | postmodernism | social commentary | abstraction | performance art | Yoko Ono | simulation | Fluxus | event score | interactive art | fine art | representation | virtual economy | satire | geocaching | alternative reality games | art games | pop culture | video games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

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4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling.

Subjects

movies | filmmaking | digital video | storytelling | modern art | media | computerized editing | personal story | emotional art | Fluxus | Bill Viola | digital representation | video recording | editing | self-exploration | performance | social critique | aesthetic form | narrative | abstract | documentary | essay | video capture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

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Lecture 27: Games as Art

Description

Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

aesthetics | postmodernism | social commentary | abstraction | performance art | Yoko Ono | simulation | Fluxus | event score | interactive art | fine art | representation | virtual economy | satire | geocaching | alternative reality games | art games | pop culture | video games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

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4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling.

Subjects

movies | filmmaking | digital video | storytelling | modern art | media | computerized editing | personal story | emotional art | Fluxus | Bill Viola | digital representation | video recording | editing | self-exploration | performance | social critique | aesthetic form | narrative | abstract | documentary | essay | video capture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT)

Description

This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure.

Subjects

movies | filmmaking | digital video | storytelling | modern art | media | computerized editing | personal story | emotional art | Fluxus | Bill Viola | digital representation | story trajectory | character development | verisimilitude | time-space continuity | viewer identification | suspension of disbelief | closure | narrative cinema | speculative biography | conceptual video | the fake | the remake | domestic ethnography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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