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21L.485 Modern Fiction (MIT) 21L.485 Modern Fiction (MIT)

Description

Tradition and innovation in representative fiction of the early modern period. Recurring themes include the role of the artist in the modern period; the representation of psychological and sexual experience; and the virtues (and defects) of the aggressively experimental character. Works by Conrad, Kipling, Babel, Kafka, James, Lawrence, Mann, Ford Madox Ford, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Nabokov. Tradition and innovation in representative fiction of the early modern period. Recurring themes include the role of the artist in the modern period; the representation of psychological and sexual experience; and the virtues (and defects) of the aggressively experimental character. Works by Conrad, Kipling, Babel, Kafka, James, Lawrence, Mann, Ford Madox Ford, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Nabokov.

Subjects

Thomas Hardy | Thomas Hardy | Jude the Obscure | Jude the Obscure | Joseph Conrad | Joseph Conrad | Lord Jim | Lord Jim | Rudyard Kipling | Rudyard Kipling | Kim | Kim | Ford Madox Ford | Ford Madox Ford | The Good Soldier | The Good Soldier | James Joyce | James Joyce | A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man | A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man | E.M. Forster | E.M. Forster | A Passage to India | A Passage to India | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | To the Lighthouse | To the Lighthouse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT) 21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT)

Description

This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald. This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Subjects

Media | film | Media | film | literature | literature | genre | genre | topic | topic | style | style | cinema | cinema | literary narrative | literary narrative | cultural | cultural | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | boundaries | boundaries | theory of narrative | theory of narrative | Akira Kurosawa | Akira Kurosawa | John Ford | John Ford | Francis Ford Coppolla | Francis Ford Coppolla | Clint Eastwood | Clint Eastwood | Orson Welles | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | Billy Wilder | Federico Fellini | Federico Fellini | Aeschylus | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Sophocles | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Cervantes | Cervantes | Honor? de Balzac | Honor? de Balzac | Henry James | Henry James | F. Scott Fitzgerald | F. Scott Fitzgerald

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT) 21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Truffaut. This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Truffaut.

Subjects

Film history | Film history | American culture | American culture | Hollywood | Hollywood | Fred Ott | Fred Ott | Early film | Early film | Griffith | Griffith | Keaton | Keaton | Chaplin | Chaplin | Renoir | Renoir | Ford | Ford | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Altman | Altman | De Sica | De Sica | Truffaut | Truffaut

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT) 21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | energy | USA | USA | oil embargo | oil embargo | Gulf War | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | George Bush | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | fossil fuel | fossil fuel | automobiles | automobiles | suburbia | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | oil drilling | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | solar power | OPEC | OPEC | EPA | EPA | Earth Day | Earth Day | environmentalism | environmentalism | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Levittown | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.485 Modern Fiction (MIT)

Description

Tradition and innovation in representative fiction of the early modern period. Recurring themes include the role of the artist in the modern period; the representation of psychological and sexual experience; and the virtues (and defects) of the aggressively experimental character. Works by Conrad, Kipling, Babel, Kafka, James, Lawrence, Mann, Ford Madox Ford, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Nabokov.

Subjects

Thomas Hardy | Jude the Obscure | Joseph Conrad | Lord Jim | Rudyard Kipling | Kim | Ford Madox Ford | The Good Soldier | James Joyce | A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man | E.M. Forster | A Passage to India | Virginia Woolf | To the Lighthouse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT)

Description

This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Subjects

Media | film | literature | genre | topic | style | cinema | literary narrative | cultural | political | aesthetic | boundaries | theory of narrative | Akira Kurosawa | John Ford | Francis Ford Coppolla | Clint Eastwood | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | Federico Fellini | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Shakespeare | Cervantes | Honor? de Balzac | Henry James | F. Scott Fitzgerald

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | church | church | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | philosphy | philosphy | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | Scotland | Scotland | english history | english history | scottish history | scottish history | Britain | Britain | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell | Jacobean era | Jacobean era | Caroline era | Caroline era | English Restoration | English Restoration | House of Stuart | House of Stuart | English Civil War | English Civil War | Early Modern English | Early Modern English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT) 21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Fellini. This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Fellini.

Subjects

film history | film history | American culture | American culture | Hollywood | Hollywood | Fred Ott | Fred Ott | early film | early film | D.W. Griffith | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Renoir | Ford | Ford | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Altman | Altman | DeSica | DeSica | narrative | narrative | video | video | visual communication | visual communication | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | hollywood | hollywood | cinema | cinema | movie | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing.

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | english history | english history | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | Shakespeare | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Marlowe | Jonson | Jonson | Webster | Webster | Ford | Ford | English Renaissance drama | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | culture | aesthetic | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | the private and the public | allegory | allegory | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | drama | drama | gender dynamics | gender dynamics | class dynamics | class dynamics | private | private | public | public | theatrically | theatrically | meta-theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | money | trade | trade | colonialism | colonialism | body | body | metaphor | metaphor | theatre | theatre | society | society | Spanish tragedy | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ía de las Relaciones Laborales ía de las Relaciones Laborales

Description

En esta asignatura se proporciona una introducción al desarrollo histórico de los sistemas de relaciones laborales en los países de Occidente. Se revisan los principales factores económicos, sociales, políticos, ideológicos e institucionales que han incidido en la consolidación de distintas configuraciones de actores colectivos e instituciones en distintos países y momentos históricos. En esta asignatura se proporciona una introducción al desarrollo histórico de los sistemas de relaciones laborales en los países de Occidente. Se revisan los principales factores económicos, sociales, políticos, ideológicos e institucionales que han incidido en la consolidación de distintas configuraciones de actores colectivos e instituciones en distintos países y momentos históricos.

Subjects

Socialismo | Socialismo | ón francesa | ón francesa | ón industrial | ón industrial | Liberalismo | Liberalismo | Nacionalismo | Nacionalismo | Licenciatura en Derecho | Licenciatura en Derecho | Estado del bienestar | Estado del bienestar | estrategias sindicales y patronales | estrategias sindicales y patronales | movimiento obrero | movimiento obrero | Derecho del Trabajo y de la Seguridad Social | Derecho del Trabajo y de la Seguridad Social | Fordismo | Fordismo | capitalismo | capitalismo | actividad sindical | actividad sindical | sociedad del mercado | sociedad del mercado | 2009 | 2009 | Licenciatura en Ciencias del Trabajo | Licenciatura en Ciencias del Trabajo | ía de las relaciones laborales | ía de las relaciones laborales

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT) 21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, from the early silent period, classic Hollywood genres including musicals, thrillers and westerns, and European and Japanese art cinema. It explores the work of Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Capra, Hawks, Hitchcock, Altman, Renoir, DeSica, and Kurosawa. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, from the early silent period, classic Hollywood genres including musicals, thrillers and westerns, and European and Japanese art cinema. It explores the work of Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Capra, Hawks, Hitchcock, Altman, Renoir, DeSica, and Kurosawa. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship.

Subjects

film history | film history | American culture | American culture | Fred Ott | Fred Ott | early film | early film | D.W. Griffith | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Renoir | Ford | Ford | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Altman | Altman | DeSica | DeSica | narrative | narrative | television | television | visual communication | visual communication | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | hollywood | hollywood | cinema | cinema | movie | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT) 21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, including works from the early silent period, documentary and avant-garde films, European art cinema, and contemporary Hollywood fare. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship. Syllabus varies from term to term, but usually includes such directors as Coppola, Eisentein, Fellini, Godard, Griffith, Hawks, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Kurosawa, Tarantino, Welles, Wiseman, and Zhang. This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, including works from the early silent period, documentary and avant-garde films, European art cinema, and contemporary Hollywood fare. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship. Syllabus varies from term to term, but usually includes such directors as Coppola, Eisentein, Fellini, Godard, Griffith, Hawks, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Kurosawa, Tarantino, Welles, Wiseman, and Zhang.

Subjects

film history | film history | American culture | American culture | Hollywood | Hollywood | Fred Ott | Fred Ott | early film | early film | D.W. Griffith | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Ford | Renoir | Ford | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Altman | DeSica | Altman | DeSica | narrative | narrative | video | video | visual communication | visual communication | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | hollywood | hollywood | cinema | cinema | movie | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, from the early silent period, classic Hollywood genres including musicals, thrillers and westerns, and European and Japanese art cinema. It explores the work of Griffith, Chaplin, Keaton, Capra, Hawks, Hitchcock, Altman, Renoir, DeSica, and Kurosawa. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship.

Subjects

film history | American culture | Fred Ott | early film | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Ford | Hitchcock | Altman | DeSica | narrative | television | visual communication | storytelling | media | hollywood | cinema | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, including works from the early silent period, documentary and avant-garde films, European art cinema, and contemporary Hollywood fare. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship. Syllabus varies from term to term, but usually includes such directors as Coppola, Eisentein, Fellini, Godard, Griffith, Hawks, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Kurosawa, Tarantino, Welles, Wiseman, and Zhang.

Subjects

film history | American culture | Hollywood | Fred Ott | early film | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Ford | Hitchcock | Altman | DeSica | narrative | video | visual communication | storytelling | media | hollywood | cinema | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special

Subjects

history | art and science | art vs. science | history of science | religion | natural philosophy | mathematics | literature | church | cosmology | physics | philosphy | astronomy | alchemy | chemistry | plays | theater history | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Ford | Tate | Behn | Francis Bacon | Burton | Hobbes | Boyle | 17th century | England | Scotland | english history | scottish history | Britain | Charles I | Charles II | Cromwell | Jacobean era | Caroline era | English Restoration | House of Stuart | English Civil War | Early Modern English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Jonson | Webster | Ford | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | allegory | aesthetic form | drama | gender dynamics | class dynamics | private | public | theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | trade | colonialism | body | metaphor | theatre | society | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Truffaut.

Subjects

Film history | American culture | Hollywood | Fred Ott | Early film | Griffith | Keaton | Chaplin | Renoir | Ford | Hitchcock | Altman | De Sica | Truffaut

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Olympic Games: catalyst of urban change

Description

The Olympic Games have emerged as a significant catalyst of urban change and can act as a key instrument of urban policy for their host cities. This paper reviews the effect of the Games on the built environment of the various cities which have acted as hosts in the modern Olympic period (1896-1996) and assesses the preparations now being made for the Games in Sydney in the year 2000. The review indicates that the Games have been increasingly used as a trigger for a wide range of urban improvements, although there have been considerable variations in the scale of infrastructural investment and in the public-private sector mix.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | post-Fordism | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | modern olympics | Pierre de Coubertin | sustainability | Munich 1972 | Montreal 1976 | Moscow 1980 | Los Angeles 1984 | Seoul 1988 | Barcelona 1992 | Atlanta 1996 | Sydney 2000 | globalisation.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Fellini.

Subjects

film history | American culture | Hollywood | Fred Ott | early film | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Ford | Hitchcock | Altman | DeSica | narrative | video | visual communication | storytelling | media | hollywood | cinema | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing.

Subjects

history | art and science | art vs. science | history of science | religion | natural philosophy | mathematics | literature | cosmology | physics | astronomy | alchemy | chemistry | plays | theater history | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Ford | Tate | Behn | Francis Bacon | Burton | Hobbes | Boyle | 17th century | England | english history | Charles I | Charles II | Cromwell

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | USA | oil embargo | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | nuclear power | wind power | fossil fuel | automobiles | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | global warming | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | OPEC | EPA | Earth Day | environmentalism | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Manhattan Project

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Olympic Games: catalyst of urban change

Description

The Olympic Games have emerged as a significant catalyst of urban change and can act as a key instrument of urban policy for their host cities. This paper reviews the effect of the Games on the built environment of the various cities which have acted as hosts in the modern Olympic period (1896-1996) and assesses the preparations now being made for the Games in Sydney in the year 2000. The review indicates that the Games have been increasingly used as a trigger for a wide range of urban improvements, although there have been considerable variations in the scale of infrastructural investment and in the public-private sector mix.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | post-Fordism | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | modern olympics | Pierre de Coubertin | sustainability | Munich 1972 | Montreal 1976 | Moscow 1980 | Los Angeles 1984 | Seoul 1988 | Barcelona 1992 | Atlanta 1996 | Sydney 2000 | globalisation.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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