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21H.346 France 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT) 21H.346 France 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

A century and a half ago, Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution of 1789 in France constituted the culmination of long-term administrative and social changes, rather than a rupture with the past. In this class, we will consider that Tocquevillian insight by examining four aspects of French experience from the reign of the Sun King, Louis XIV, to the rule of the Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte: Absolutism, Enlightenment, Revolution, and Empire. Through the study of primary and secondary sources, we will see how the material lives, mental worlds, and individual and communal identities of the French changed over this century and a half. A century and a half ago, Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution of 1789 in France constituted the culmination of long-term administrative and social changes, rather than a rupture with the past. In this class, we will consider that Tocquevillian insight by examining four aspects of French experience from the reign of the Sun King, Louis XIV, to the rule of the Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte: Absolutism, Enlightenment, Revolution, and Empire. Through the study of primary and secondary sources, we will see how the material lives, mental worlds, and individual and communal identities of the French changed over this century and a half.

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleon | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | constitutional monarchy | France | France | de Tocqueville | de Tocqueville | administrative | administrative | social | social | changes | changes | Louis XIV | Louis XIV | absolutism | absolutism | enlightenment | enlightenment | revolution | revolution | empire | empire

License

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21G.059 Paradigms of European Thought and Culture (MIT) 21G.059 Paradigms of European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys the main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe (Geistesgeschichte, histoire des idées). The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. With each text, special consideration will be devoted to the work's enduring influence over contemporary European culture. This subject surveys the main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe (Geistesgeschichte, histoire des idées). The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. With each text, special consideration will be devoted to the work's enduring influence over contemporary European culture.

Subjects

Paradigms | Paradigms | European | European | Thought | Thought | Culture | Culture | History | History | Protestant Reformation | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | French Revolution | Luther | Luther | Descartes | Descartes | Kant | Kant | Hegel | Hegel | Rousseau | Rousseau | Smith | Smith | Marx | Marx | Freud | Freud | Goya | Goya | David | David | Duchamp | Duchamp | Schinkel | Schinkel | Bach | Bach | Goethe | Goethe | Political Theory | Political Theory | Philosophy | Philosophy

License

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21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT) 21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT)

Description

The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleon | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | constitutional monarchy | Old Regime | Old Regime | republic | republic | dictatorship | dictatorship | committee | committee | parliament | parliament | First Empire | First Empire

License

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21H.346 France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT) 21H.346 France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon. This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | history | history | french history | french history | european history | european history | napolean boneparte | napolean boneparte | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | the rights of man | the rights of man | Molière | Molière | Voltaire | Voltaire

License

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Crown and peers: the monarchy and the Lords in British politics, 1783-1846 Crown and peers: the monarchy and the Lords in British politics, 1783-1846

Description

Welcome to this learning object on the Monarchy and the Lords in British Politics, 1783-1846. It has been developed for use on the module The Many Faces of Reform which explores key themes in the political history of Britain from the time of the French Revolution to the middle of the nineteenth century. Welcome to this learning object on the Monarchy and the Lords in British Politics, 1783-1846. It has been developed for use on the module The Many Faces of Reform which explores key themes in the political history of Britain from the time of the French Revolution to the middle of the nineteenth century.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | The House of Lords | The House of Lords | The Monarchy | The Monarchy | The House of Commons | The House of Commons | French Revolution | French Revolution | political history of Britain | political history of Britain | Political Reform | Political Reform | British Politics | 1790-1850 | British Politics | 1790-1850 | Monarchs and Consorts | Monarchs and Consorts

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21G.059 European Thought and Culture (MIT) 21G.059 European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film. This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film.

Subjects

Paradigms | Paradigms | European | European | Thought | Thought | Culture | Culture | History | History | Protestant Reformation | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | French Revolution | Luther | Luther | Descartes | Descartes | Kant | Kant | Hegel | Hegel | Rousseau | Rousseau | Smith | Smith | Marx | Marx | Freud | Freud | Goya | Goya | David | David | Duchamp | Duchamp | Schinkel | Schinkel | Bach | Bach | Goethe | Goethe | political theory | political theory | philosophy | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT) 21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College. This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | capitalist economies | capitalist economies | industrialization | industrialization | modern states | modern states | bourgeois society | bourgeois society | The Opium War | The Opium War | the French Revolution | the French Revolution | haitian Revolution | haitian Revolution | advertising | advertising

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.343J Making Books: The Renaissance and Today (MIT) 21H.343J Making Books: The Renaissance and Today (MIT)

Description

This course explores the impact of new technology on the recording and distribution of words and images at three different times: The invention of the printing press ca. 1450; the adaptation of electricity to communication technology in the 19th century (telegraph, telephone, phonograph); and the emergence of digital media today. Assignments include essays and online projects. Students also participate in the design and construction of a hand-set printing press. This course is also part of the Concourse program at MIT. This course explores the impact of new technology on the recording and distribution of words and images at three different times: The invention of the printing press ca. 1450; the adaptation of electricity to communication technology in the 19th century (telegraph, telephone, phonograph); and the emergence of digital media today. Assignments include essays and online projects. Students also participate in the design and construction of a hand-set printing press. This course is also part of the Concourse program at MIT.

Subjects

Gutenberg Bible | Gutenberg Bible | French Revolution | French Revolution | printing press | printing press | books | books | Renaissance period | Renaissance period | Early Modern period | Early Modern period | Gill and Edes | Gill and Edes | paper-making | paper-making | Book of Hours | Book of Hours | Nuremburg Chronicle | Nuremburg Chronicle | Decrees of Gregory IX | Decrees of Gregory IX | English Book of Martyrs | English Book of Martyrs | King James Bible | King James Bible | Lutheran Bible | Lutheran Bible | religion | religion | Hart Nautical Collection | Hart Nautical Collection | polyglot Bible | polyglot Bible | engraving | engraving | Ambroise Pare | Ambroise Pare | Gessner | Gessner | Galileo | Galileo | Tycho Brahe | Tycho Brahe | Spheres of Sacrobosco | Spheres of Sacrobosco | De Re Metallica | De Re Metallica | Mathematical Recreations | Mathematical Recreations | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Menocchio | Menocchio | Domenico Scandella | Domenico Scandella

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.059 European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film.

Subjects

Paradigms | European | Thought | Culture | History | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | Luther | Descartes | Kant | Hegel | Rousseau | Smith | Marx | Freud | Goya | David | Duchamp | Schinkel | Bach | Goethe | political theory | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College.

Subjects

colonization | capitalist economies | industrialization | modern states | bourgeois society | The Opium War | the French Revolution | haitian Revolution | advertising

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Thomas Paine, Rights of Man

Description

Video and Powerpoint of lecture by Christina Hendricks for the "Remake/Remodel" theme

Subjects

Christina Hendricks | lecture | powerpoint | Remake/Remodel | video | C18th | democracy | England | French Revolution | gender | Paine | political theory | politics | power | Revolution | social contract | sovereignty

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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21F.059 European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe. The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. Among the topics to be considered: the critique of religion, the promise of independence, the advance of capitalism, the temptations of Marxism, the origins of totalitarianism, and the dialects of enlightenment. In addition to texts, we will also discuss pieces of art, incl. paintings and film.

Subjects

Paradigms | European | Thought | Culture | History | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | Luther | Descartes | Kant | Hegel | Rousseau | Smith | Marx | Freud | Goya | David | Duchamp | Schinkel | Bach | Goethe | political theory | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DP4C34 History A: Introducing Topics within a Historical Period

Description

This Unit is designed to meet the needs of candidates undertaking the HN Social Science History A course. It will examine a variety of historical topics in Europe in the late 18th and 19th centuries. It will use two particular approaches to enable you to gain an understanding of the major events during this time by: • examining social, political, economic and cultural changes throughout the period. • using a variety of sources that contain different viewpoints about these changes. These approaches will allow you to understand the reasons for change and also place events and views in context. Outcome 1 You will be asked to explain the main developments associated with a specific situation or a particular event or series of events. Outcome 2 You will be asked to describe how the contribu

Subjects

DP4C 34 | Europe in the 18th Century | Causes of the French Revolution | Identity of Europe | Reign of Napoleon | Congress of Vienna | Breakdown of the Congress System | Growth in Socialism | Revolutions of 1848 | German States 1800–1848 | Influence of Napoleon | Reform in Prussia | Otto von Bismarck | Danish War 1864 | D: Humanities (History/Archaeology/Religious Studies/Philosophy) | HUMANITIES (HISTORY / ARCHAEOLOGY / RELIGIOUS STUDIES / PHILOSOPHY) | SCQF Level 7

License

Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College.

Subjects

colonization | capitalist economies | industrialization | modern states | bourgeois society | The Opium War | the French Revolution | haitian Revolution | advertising

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.346 France 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

A century and a half ago, Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution of 1789 in France constituted the culmination of long-term administrative and social changes, rather than a rupture with the past. In this class, we will consider that Tocquevillian insight by examining four aspects of French experience from the reign of the Sun King, Louis XIV, to the rule of the Emperor Napolon Bonaparte: Absolutism, Enlightenment, Revolution, and Empire. Through the study of primary and secondary sources, we will see how the material lives, mental worlds, and individual and communal identities of the French changed over this century and a half.

Subjects

French Revolution | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | France | de Tocqueville | administrative | social | changes | Louis XIV | absolutism | enlightenment | revolution | empire

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.059 Paradigms of European Thought and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject surveys the main currents of European cultural and intellectual history in the modern period. Such a foundation course is central to the humanities in Europe (Geistesgeschichte, histoire des idées). The curriculum introduces a set of ideas and arguments that have played a formative role in European cultural history, and acquaints them with some exemplars of critical thought. With each text, special consideration will be devoted to the work's enduring influence over contemporary European culture.

Subjects

Paradigms | European | Thought | Culture | History | Protestant Reformation | French Revolution | Luther | Descartes | Kant | Hegel | Rousseau | Smith | Marx | Freud | Goya | David | Duchamp | Schinkel | Bach | Goethe | Political Theory | Philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT)

Description

The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini

Subjects

French Revolution | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | Old Regime | republic | dictatorship | committee | parliament | First Empire

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.343J Making Books: The Renaissance and Today (MIT)

Description

This course explores the impact of new technology on the recording and distribution of words and images at three different times: The invention of the printing press ca. 1450; the adaptation of electricity to communication technology in the 19th century (telegraph, telephone, phonograph); and the emergence of digital media today. Assignments include essays and online projects. Students also participate in the design and construction of a hand-set printing press. This course is also part of the Concourse program at MIT.

Subjects

Gutenberg Bible | French Revolution | printing press | books | Renaissance period | Early Modern period | Gill and Edes | paper-making | Book of Hours | Nuremburg Chronicle | Decrees of Gregory IX | English Book of Martyrs | King James Bible | Lutheran Bible | religion | Hart Nautical Collection | polyglot Bible | engraving | Ambroise Pare | Gessner | Galileo | Tycho Brahe | Spheres of Sacrobosco | De Re Metallica | Mathematical Recreations | The Cheese and the Worms | Menocchio | Domenico Scandella

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | revolution | Europe | Italy | French Revolution | theology | magic | science | England | censorship | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Constantine | printing | rare books | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | free will | Luther | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | religion | Menocchio | skepticism | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Principia | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | d'Alembert | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.346 France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

Subjects

French Revolution | history | french history | european history | napolean boneparte | Louis XVI | the rights of man | re | Voltaire

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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