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14.451 Macroeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.451 Macroeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the theories of economic growth. Topics will include basic facts of economic growth and long-run economic development; brief overview of optimal control theory and dynamic programming; basic neoclassical growth model under a variety of market structures; human capital and economic growth; endogenous growth models; models with endogenous technology; models of directed technical change; competition, market structure and growth; financial and economic development; international trade and economic growth; institutions and economic development. This is a half-term subject. The class size is limited. Introduction to the theories of economic growth. Topics will include basic facts of economic growth and long-run economic development; brief overview of optimal control theory and dynamic programming; basic neoclassical growth model under a variety of market structures; human capital and economic growth; endogenous growth models; models with endogenous technology; models of directed technical change; competition, market structure and growth; financial and economic development; international trade and economic growth; institutions and economic development. This is a half-term subject. The class size is limited.

Subjects

macroeconomic theory | macroeconomic theory | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | solow growth model | solow growth model | neoclassical growth model | neoclassical growth model | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | human capital | human capital | Bellman equation | Bellman equation | theory of optimal control | theory of optimal control | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | GDP | GDP | per capita income | per capita income | asset pricing | asset pricing | public finance | public finance | overlappiing generations | overlappiing generations | AK | AK | spillovers | spillovers | expanding variety models | expanding variety models | Sala-i-Martin | Sala-i-Martin | Daron Acemoglu | Daron Acemoglu | Barro | Barro

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to macroeconomics Introduction to macroeconomics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. This module provides an introduction to modern macroeconomic analysis. Macroeconomics is concerned with some of the most pressing and fundamental questions economists can ask, such as: What determines economic growth? Why do economies exhibit expansions ('booms') and contractions ('busts') in output? What drives employment and wages, saving and investment? What causes inflation and why is it a problem? What, if anything, can governments do to improve the performance of an economy? Microeconomics is concerned with the analysis of economic agents and markets at the individual level. Macroeconomics is concerned with the aggregate implications of microeconomic behaviour a This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. This module provides an introduction to modern macroeconomic analysis. Macroeconomics is concerned with some of the most pressing and fundamental questions economists can ask, such as: What determines economic growth? Why do economies exhibit expansions ('booms') and contractions ('busts') in output? What drives employment and wages, saving and investment? What causes inflation and why is it a problem? What, if anything, can governments do to improve the performance of an economy? Microeconomics is concerned with the analysis of economic agents and markets at the individual level. Macroeconomics is concerned with the aggregate implications of microeconomic behaviour a

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | Analysis of Markets | Analysis of Markets | Key Economic Indicators | Key Economic Indicators | GDP | GDP | Economic Growth | Economic Growth | Economic Fluctuations | Economic Fluctuations | Money and Prices | Money and Prices | Government Policy | Government Policy | Economics | Economics

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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14.451 Macroeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the theories of economic growth. Topics will include basic facts of economic growth and long-run economic development; brief overview of optimal control theory and dynamic programming; basic neoclassical growth model under a variety of market structures; human capital and economic growth; endogenous growth models; models with endogenous technology; models of directed technical change; competition, market structure and growth; financial and economic development; international trade and economic growth; institutions and economic development. This is a half-term subject. The class size is limited.

Subjects

macroeconomic theory | macroeconomics | solow growth model | neoclassical growth model | endogenous growth | human capital | Bellman equation | theory of optimal control | dynamic programming | GDP | per capita income | asset pricing | public finance | overlappiing generations | AK | spillovers | expanding variety models | Sala-i-Martin | Daron Acemoglu | Barro

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Video on understanding GDP (Gross Domestic Product)

Description

A short, non-technical account of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), starting with its component parts (without using further jargon such as primary, secondary and tertiary) and ending with the observation that it looks backwards, not forwards. This BBC News clip is published as part of BBC News Online and was first broadcast on 23 July 2010. Please note this clip is only available in Flash. Useful in Economic Issues Unit

Subjects

GDP | HNC | F7J834 | #hnbusiness | EB | SCQF Level 7

License

http://www.bbc.co.uk/terms/business.shtml http://www.bbc.co.uk/terms/business.shtml BBC

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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