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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Investigating the German language Investigating the German language

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. This 10 credit module will look at some of the ways in which German has been developing in recent years. In particular, we will look at variation and change in sentence structure; ways in which new modes of communication (such as texting, chat rooms and other forms of internet communication) are influencing language use; and the use of particles (little words like doch, mal, schon, etc.). By the end of the module, you will have carried out a small research project that allows you to compare Germans’ actual language use with what the dictionaries, grammar-books and other reference works say. Suitable for study at undergraduate level 2. Dr Nicola McLelland, School of Mode This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. This 10 credit module will look at some of the ways in which German has been developing in recent years. In particular, we will look at variation and change in sentence structure; ways in which new modes of communication (such as texting, chat rooms and other forms of internet communication) are influencing language use; and the use of particles (little words like doch, mal, schon, etc.). By the end of the module, you will have carried out a small research project that allows you to compare Germans’ actual language use with what the dictionaries, grammar-books and other reference works say. Suitable for study at undergraduate level 2. Dr Nicola McLelland, School of Mode

Subjects

UNow | UNow | variation in German sentence structure | variation in German sentence structure | new modes of communication | new modes of communication | German language | German language | German sentance structure | German sentance structure | use of partcicles | use of partcicles | German grammar | German grammar | ukoer | ukoer

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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The sounds of German The sounds of German

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module investigates the sounds of German and how they can be described accurately (“phonetics and phonology”). Students will learn to transcribe German using the notation of the International Phonetic Association, and we will look in particular at aspects of German pronunciation that are hard to master because they are different to English or similar to French. We will also look at how foreign words (including English words) are integrated into the German sound system, and at regional variation in spoken German. Practical transcription skills will form a major part of coursework, including one of the two assignments. Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1. D This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module investigates the sounds of German and how they can be described accurately (“phonetics and phonology”). Students will learn to transcribe German using the notation of the International Phonetic Association, and we will look in particular at aspects of German pronunciation that are hard to master because they are different to English or similar to French. We will also look at how foreign words (including English words) are integrated into the German sound system, and at regional variation in spoken German. Practical transcription skills will form a major part of coursework, including one of the two assignments. Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1. D

Subjects

UNow | UNow | German language | German language | ukoer | ukoer | phonetics and phonology | phonetics and phonology | International Phonetic Association | International Phonetic Association | German pronunciation | German pronunciation | German sound system | German sound system | regional variation in spoken German | regional variation in spoken German | practical transcription skills | practical transcription skills

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Der arme Heinrich Der arme Heinrich

Description

ebook version of Der arme Heinrich ebook version of Der arme Heinrich

Subjects

kind | kind | Poems -- Germany -- 12th century | Poems -- Germany -- 12th century | Epics -- Germany -- 12th century | Epics -- Germany -- 12th century | Devotional literature -- Germany -- 12th century | Devotional literature -- Germany -- 12th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.447 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (MIT) 21H.447 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (MIT)

Description

The rise and fall of National Socialism is one of the most intensively-studied topics in European history. Nevertheless, after more than half a century, popular views of Nazism in the media and among the public remain simplistic-essentialized by equal parts fascination and horror. Adolf Hitler, for instance, is often portrayed as an evil genius of supernatural ability; while the Nazi state is similarly imagined to have held absolute power over every aspect of its subjects' lives. Such characterizations allow ordinary Germans to be portrayed as helpless victims of Nazism, ensnared or coerced into submission by forces beyond their control. Another popular characterization is that German culture itself is fundamentally flawed - that all Germans were basically Nazis at heart. This schema conv The rise and fall of National Socialism is one of the most intensively-studied topics in European history. Nevertheless, after more than half a century, popular views of Nazism in the media and among the public remain simplistic-essentialized by equal parts fascination and horror. Adolf Hitler, for instance, is often portrayed as an evil genius of supernatural ability; while the Nazi state is similarly imagined to have held absolute power over every aspect of its subjects' lives. Such characterizations allow ordinary Germans to be portrayed as helpless victims of Nazism, ensnared or coerced into submission by forces beyond their control. Another popular characterization is that German culture itself is fundamentally flawed - that all Germans were basically Nazis at heart. This schema conv

Subjects

History | History | Nazi | Nazi | Germany | Germany | Holocaust | Holocaust | National Socialism | National Socialism | Europe | Europe | media public | media public | Adolf Hitler | Adolf Hitler | ordinary | ordinary | Germans | Germans | fascism | fascism | Western nations | Western nations | Americans | Americans | Westerners | Westerners | national | national | cultures | cultures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT) 21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT)

Description

This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales. This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales.

Subjects

england | england | britain | britain | culture | culture | history | history | monarchy | monarchy | windsor | windsor | hanover | hanover | george III | george III | George IV | George IV | victoria | victoria | albert | albert | prince | prince | queen | queen | king | king | edward VIII | edward VIII | diana | diana | princess | princess | dynasty | dynasty | politics | politics | william IV | william IV | empire | empire | elizabeth | elizabeth | George IV | victoria | George IV | victoria | Britain | Britain | British | British | Hanover | Hanover | Windsor | Windsor | 1714 | 1714 | crises | crises | George III | George III | scandal | scandal | Victoria | Victoria | Albert | Albert | abdication | abdication | Edward VIII | Edward VIII | Diana | Diana | Wales | Wales | portraits | portraits | news footage | news footage | films | films | Tudors | Tudors | Stuarts | Stuarts | pageantry | pageantry | royal | royal | George I | George I | George II | George II | England | England | Germany | Germany | regent | regent | William IV | William IV | empress | empress | India | India | Edward VII | Edward VII | George V | George V | war | war | George VI | George VI | Elizabeth II | Elizabeth II | British politics | British politics | British culture | British culture | Accession | Accession | House of Hanover | House of Hanover | House of Windsor | House of Windsor | political | political | mental illness | mental illness | public life | public life | Prince Albert | Prince Albert | Princess of Wales | Princess of Wales | German Kings | German Kings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Rundblick: beginners' German Rundblick: beginners' German Rundblick: beginners' German Rundblick: beginners' German

Description

Do you want to learn the basics of the German language? This free course, Rundblick: beginners' German, will take you on a journey through German-speaking countries. You will read and hear about a range of places and people. This OpenLearn course will give you the opportunity to develop language skills which will help you to cope in a range of situations. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Rundblick: beginners' German. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Do you want to learn the basics of the German language? This free course, Rundblick: beginners' German, will take you on a journey through German-speaking countries. You will read and hear about a range of places and people. This OpenLearn course will give you the opportunity to develop language skills which will help you to cope in a range of situations. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Rundblick: beginners' German. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

German | German | beginners | beginners | food and drink | food and drink | German advanced | German advanced | introducing oneself | introducing oneself | Language | Language | ordering food and drink | ordering food and drink | L193_1 | L193_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT) 21G.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT)

Description

Dieser Kurs beleuchtet schwerpunktartig das neue Selbstbewusstsein von Minoritäten in Deutschland. Zahlreiche aktuelle Beispiele aus Film, Radio, Fernsehen und Literatur belegen den zunehmenden Beitrag dieser Gruppe zum Kultur- und Medienschaffen in Deutschland, sowie deren sich verändernde Repräsentation in den deutschen Medien. Ein zweiter Themenbereich behandelt den neuen Blick nach Osten und die aktuelle Verarbeitung der deutschen Vereinigung unter dem Stichwort Ostalgie. Jüngste Beispiele von populären Medienformen wie Hörspiel und Kurzfilm verdeutlichen die spezifischen Produktions- und Rezeptionsbedingungen in der deutschen Medienlandschaft. In einem Hörspiel-Workshop mit der deutsch-japanischen Schriftstellerin Yoko Taw Dieser Kurs beleuchtet schwerpunktartig das neue Selbstbewusstsein von Minoritäten in Deutschland. Zahlreiche aktuelle Beispiele aus Film, Radio, Fernsehen und Literatur belegen den zunehmenden Beitrag dieser Gruppe zum Kultur- und Medienschaffen in Deutschland, sowie deren sich verändernde Repräsentation in den deutschen Medien. Ein zweiter Themenbereich behandelt den neuen Blick nach Osten und die aktuelle Verarbeitung der deutschen Vereinigung unter dem Stichwort Ostalgie. Jüngste Beispiele von populären Medienformen wie Hörspiel und Kurzfilm verdeutlichen die spezifischen Produktions- und Rezeptionsbedingungen in der deutschen Medienlandschaft. In einem Hörspiel-Workshop mit der deutsch-japanischen Schriftstellerin Yoko Taw

Subjects

German | German | Germany | Germany | minorities | minorities | film | film | radio | radio | television | television | literature | literature | culture | culture | media | media | Ostalgie | Ostalgie | kurzfilm | kurzfilm | radioplay | radioplay | workshop | workshop | Yoko Tawada | Yoko Tawada | production | production | Aprilkinder | Aprilkinder | Fatih Akin | Fatih Akin | Kanak Attack | Kanak Attack | Good Bye Lenin | Good Bye Lenin | Sonnenallee | Sonnenallee | Zimmerspringbrunnen | Zimmerspringbrunnen | Halbe Treppe | Halbe Treppe | Walter Ruttmann | Walter Ruttmann | Paul W?hr; Bill Fontana. | Paul W?hr; Bill Fontana. | Paul W?hr | Paul W?hr | Bill Fontana. | Bill Fontana.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Political Epistemics: The Secret Police, the Opposition, and the End of East German Socialism

Description

Sociological analysis of the End of East German Socialism. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

secret police | East Germany | Socialist Germany | secret police | East Germany | Socialist Germany

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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LiederSongs LiederSongs

Description

ebook version of LiederSongs ebook version of LiederSongs

Subjects

kind | kind | Songs | German (Middle High German) -- 12th century | Songs | German (Middle High German) -- 12th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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German stage 2 semester A German stage 2 semester A

Description

This module is aimed post GCSE students in semester A and addresses common grammatical problems areas. The grammar exercises are also supported by audio, so that the pronunciation is underlined and listening skills are practiced. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand. This module is aimed post GCSE students in semester A and addresses common grammatical problems areas. The grammar exercises are also supported by audio, so that the pronunciation is underlined and listening skills are practiced. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | German adjectives | German adjectives | German word order | German word order | Listening exercises | Listening exercises | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT) 21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT)

Description

In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen Überblick über einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstücke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere ästhetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verständnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedächtnis. In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen Überblick über einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstücke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere ästhetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verständnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedächtnis.

Subjects

modern German literature | modern German literature | lyric poetry | lyric poetry | drama | drama | film | film | poetry | poetry | radio plays | radio plays | architecture | architecture | translation and interpretation | translation and interpretation | essays | essays | cultural context | cultural context | scientific ethics | scientific ethics | technology | technology | construction of national history | construction of national history | the Holocaust | the Holocaust | 20th century Germany | 20th century Germany

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT) 21G.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT)

Description

The topic for Fall 2006 is short film and radio plays. This course investigates current trends and topics in German literary, theater, film, television, radio, and other media arts productions. Students analyze media texts in the context of their production, reception, and distribution as well as the public debates initiated by these works. The topic for Fall 2006 is German Short Film, a popular format that represents most recent trends in film production, and German Radio Art, a striving genre that includes experimental radio plays, sound art, and audio installations. Special attention will be given to the representation of German minorities, contrasted by their own artistic expressions reflecting changes in identity and a new political voice. Students have the opportunity to discuss cour The topic for Fall 2006 is short film and radio plays. This course investigates current trends and topics in German literary, theater, film, television, radio, and other media arts productions. Students analyze media texts in the context of their production, reception, and distribution as well as the public debates initiated by these works. The topic for Fall 2006 is German Short Film, a popular format that represents most recent trends in film production, and German Radio Art, a striving genre that includes experimental radio plays, sound art, and audio installations. Special attention will be given to the representation of German minorities, contrasted by their own artistic expressions reflecting changes in identity and a new political voice. Students have the opportunity to discuss cour

Subjects

German | German | Germany | Germany | kurtzfilm | kurtzfilm | radio | radio | radio plays | radio plays | theater | theater | film | film | television | television | media | media | media text | media text | production | production | filmmaker | filmmaker | art | art | broadcast | broadcast | experimental radio art | experimental radio art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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German Novellen: Kleist, Tieck, Grimm

Description

Video and presentation from Jason Lieblang's lecture on the 18th & 19th century German Novelle, or short story, focusing on Heinrich von Kleist, Ludwig Tieck, and the Brothers Grimm.

Subjects

Jason Lieblang | lecture | powerpoint | Seeing and Knowing | video | C18th | C19th | German Idealism | German Novelle | German Romanticism | grimm | Kleist | Tieck

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT) 21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan. Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | World Trade Center | September 11 | September 11 | memorial | memorial | discourse | discourse | media | media | art | art | collective memory | collective memory | Germany | Germany | Japan | Japan | global commerce | global commerce | transportation | transportation | systems | systems | surveillance | surveillance | non-Western cultures | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Chomsky | Freud | Freud | Edward Said | Edward Said

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.447 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (MIT)

Description

The rise and fall of National Socialism is one of the most intensively-studied topics in European history. Nevertheless, after more than half a century, popular views of Nazism in the media and among the public remain simplistic-essentialized by equal parts fascination and horror. Adolf Hitler, for instance, is often portrayed as an evil genius of supernatural ability; while the Nazi state is similarly imagined to have held absolute power over every aspect of its subjects' lives. Such characterizations allow ordinary Germans to be portrayed as helpless victims of Nazism, ensnared or coerced into submission by forces beyond their control. Another popular characterization is that German culture itself is fundamentally flawed - that all Germans were basically Nazis at heart. This schema conv

Subjects

History | Nazi | Germany | Holocaust | National Socialism | Europe | media public | Adolf Hitler | ordinary | Germans | fascism | Western nations | Americans | Westerners | national | cultures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Landschaftliche Vielfalt Landschaftliche Vielfalt

Description

German regions and landscapes, local traditions and the notion of Heimat are at the centre of this free course, Landschaftliche Vielfalt. You will describe images, make notes from a variety of sources, and write a short piece about the three-nations region around Lake Constance. First published on Tue, 09 Feb 2016 as Landschaftliche Vielfalt. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 German regions and landscapes, local traditions and the notion of Heimat are at the centre of this free course, Landschaftliche Vielfalt. You will describe images, make notes from a variety of sources, and write a short piece about the three-nations region around Lake Constance. First published on Tue, 09 Feb 2016 as Landschaftliche Vielfalt. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Languages | Languages | German | German | L313_1 | L313_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Freemasons versus Jesuits: Conspiracy Theories in Enlightenment Germany

Description

Inaugural lecture by Ritchie Robertson as Taylor Professor of the German Language and Literature. Lecture title: Freemasons versus Jesuits: Conspiracy Theories in Enlightenment Germany. Given on 20 October 2011.

Subjects

jesuits | enlightenment | Germany | freemasons | jesuits | enlightenment | Germany | freemasons

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT)

Description

In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen berblick ber einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstcke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere sthetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verstndnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedchtnis.

Subjects

modern German literature | lyric poetry | drama | film | poetry | radio plays | architecture | translation and interpretation | essays | cultural context | scientific ethics | technology | construction of national history | the Holocaust | 20th century Germany

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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