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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Der arme Heinrich Der arme Heinrich

Description

ebook version of Der arme Heinrich ebook version of Der arme Heinrich

Subjects

kind | kind | Poems -- Germany -- 12th century | Poems -- Germany -- 12th century | Epics -- Germany -- 12th century | Epics -- Germany -- 12th century | Devotional literature -- Germany -- 12th century | Devotional literature -- Germany -- 12th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Political Epistemics: The Secret Police, the Opposition, and the End of East German Socialism

Description

Sociological analysis of the End of East German Socialism. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

secret police | East Germany | Socialist Germany | secret police | East Germany | Socialist Germany

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT) 21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan. Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | World Trade Center | September 11 | September 11 | memorial | memorial | discourse | discourse | media | media | art | art | collective memory | collective memory | Germany | Germany | Japan | Japan | global commerce | global commerce | transportation | transportation | systems | systems | surveillance | surveillance | non-Western cultures | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Chomsky | Freud | Freud | Edward Said | Edward Said

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Freemasons versus Jesuits: Conspiracy Theories in Enlightenment Germany

Description

Inaugural lecture by Ritchie Robertson as Taylor Professor of the German Language and Literature. Lecture title: Freemasons versus Jesuits: Conspiracy Theories in Enlightenment Germany. Given on 20 October 2011.

Subjects

jesuits | enlightenment | Germany | freemasons | jesuits | enlightenment | Germany | freemasons

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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networks

Description

Uta Lehmann presents her paper 'Skilled Iranians in Germany and the United States: exploring migrants' networks' in Parallel session V(C) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 Every year 150.000 highly skilled persons leave Iran and seek new opportunities in the United States and Europe (Carrington/Detragiache 1998). A look back at history shows that these migration flows have a long tradition. They first started with educational exchanges in the early 19th century and reached its climax in the year of the Iranian Revolution in 1979. A well-educated Diaspora has resulted as a result of these movements. However, empirical findings indicate that Iranians immigrating to the United States are more successful in sustaining and promoting their ed

Subjects

THEMIS | migration | skilled-migration | iran | Germany | united states | THEMIS | migration | skilled-migration | iran | Germany | united states | 2013-09-26

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.447 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (MIT) 21H.447 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (MIT)

Description

The rise and fall of National Socialism is one of the most intensively-studied topics in European history. Nevertheless, after more than half a century, popular views of Nazism in the media and among the public remain simplistic-essentialized by equal parts fascination and horror. Adolf Hitler, for instance, is often portrayed as an evil genius of supernatural ability; while the Nazi state is similarly imagined to have held absolute power over every aspect of its subjects' lives. Such characterizations allow ordinary Germans to be portrayed as helpless victims of Nazism, ensnared or coerced into submission by forces beyond their control. Another popular characterization is that German culture itself is fundamentally flawed - that all Germans were basically Nazis at heart. This schema conv The rise and fall of National Socialism is one of the most intensively-studied topics in European history. Nevertheless, after more than half a century, popular views of Nazism in the media and among the public remain simplistic-essentialized by equal parts fascination and horror. Adolf Hitler, for instance, is often portrayed as an evil genius of supernatural ability; while the Nazi state is similarly imagined to have held absolute power over every aspect of its subjects' lives. Such characterizations allow ordinary Germans to be portrayed as helpless victims of Nazism, ensnared or coerced into submission by forces beyond their control. Another popular characterization is that German culture itself is fundamentally flawed - that all Germans were basically Nazis at heart. This schema conv

Subjects

History | History | Nazi | Nazi | Germany | Germany | Holocaust | Holocaust | National Socialism | National Socialism | Europe | Europe | media public | media public | Adolf Hitler | Adolf Hitler | ordinary | ordinary | Germans | Germans | fascism | fascism | Western nations | Western nations | Americans | Americans | Westerners | Westerners | national | national | cultures | cultures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT) 21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT)

Description

This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales. This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales.

Subjects

england | england | britain | britain | culture | culture | history | history | monarchy | monarchy | windsor | windsor | hanover | hanover | george III | george III | George IV | George IV | victoria | victoria | albert | albert | prince | prince | queen | queen | king | king | edward VIII | edward VIII | diana | diana | princess | princess | dynasty | dynasty | politics | politics | william IV | william IV | empire | empire | elizabeth | elizabeth | George IV | victoria | George IV | victoria | Britain | Britain | British | British | Hanover | Hanover | Windsor | Windsor | 1714 | 1714 | crises | crises | George III | George III | scandal | scandal | Victoria | Victoria | Albert | Albert | abdication | abdication | Edward VIII | Edward VIII | Diana | Diana | Wales | Wales | portraits | portraits | news footage | news footage | films | films | Tudors | Tudors | Stuarts | Stuarts | pageantry | pageantry | royal | royal | George I | George I | George II | George II | England | England | Germany | Germany | regent | regent | William IV | William IV | empress | empress | India | India | Edward VII | Edward VII | George V | George V | war | war | George VI | George VI | Elizabeth II | Elizabeth II | British politics | British politics | British culture | British culture | Accession | Accession | House of Hanover | House of Hanover | House of Windsor | House of Windsor | political | political | mental illness | mental illness | public life | public life | Prince Albert | Prince Albert | Princess of Wales | Princess of Wales | German Kings | German Kings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Reporting the UK to Germany

Description

John F Jungclaussen, Die Zeit, UK Correspondent, gives a talk for the RISJ seminar series on reporting UK news to the German news media. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

die ziet | media | journalism | reuters | Germany | politics | die ziet | media | journalism | reuters | Germany | politics | 2013-05-15

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Holocaust, Narrative and Remembrance - Part Two

Description

Part 2/2. Workshop with Prof Dan Stone (RHUL), Paul Salmons (the IOE's Centre for Holocaust Education) and Prof Mark Roseman (Indiana University). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | 2012-05-02

License

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The Holocaust, Narrative and Remembrance - Part One

Description

Part 1/2. Workshop with with Prof Dan Stone (RHUL), Paul Salmons (the IOE's Centre for Holocaust Education) and Prof Mark Roseman (Indiana University). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | 2012-05-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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šnder in conversation

Description

A discussion forum on writing Holocaust history with Prof Jane Caplan (St Antony's College, Oxford), Prof Mark Roseman (Indiana University) and Prof Nicholas Stargardt (Magdalen College, Oxford). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | 2012-05-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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šnder: Trends in the historiography of the Holocaust

Description

Professor Saul Friedlšnder delivers a lecture as the inaugural Humanitas Visiting Professor in Historiography. Saul Friedlšnder has been Professor of History at Tel Aviv University and the University of California, Los Angeles, where he holds the 1939 Club Chair in Holocaust Studies. Among Friedlšnder's many books on Nazism and the Holocaust, the most recent are Nazi Germany and the Jews: The Years of Persecution, 1933-1939, (HarperCollins 1997) and The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945 (HarperCollins 2007). Most recently, he received the Peace Prize of the German Book-Trade Association (2007) and, in 2008, the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Jew | humanities | Jewish | ww2 | holocaust | war | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | Jew | humanities | Jewish | ww2 | holocaust | war | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | 2012-04-30

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT) 17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e

Subjects

Health care | Health care | policy | policy | United States | United States | medical services | medical services | health care costs | health care costs | markets | markets | regulatory policy | regulatory policy | Canada | Canada | Great Britian | Great Britian | Japan | Japan | Germany | Germany | technology | technology | decentralization | decentralization | health risks | health risks | comparative prospectives | comparative prospectives | access | access | reform | reform | political | political | organizational | organizational | factors | factors

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.061 Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture (MIT) 21G.061 Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture (MIT)

Description

This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have e This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have e

Subjects

Plotting | Plotting | Terrorism | Terrorism | European | European | Culture | Culture | Literature | Literature | Opposition | Opposition | Revolution | Revolution | Anarchism | Anarchism | Kleist | Kleist | Conrad | Conrad | Red Brigade | Red Brigade | Italy | Italy | Red Army Faction | Red Army Faction | Germany | Germany | Real Irish Republican Army | Real Irish Republican Army | Media | Media | Ireland | Ireland

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Holocaust, Narrative and Remembrance - Part Two

Description

Part 2/2. Workshop with Prof Dan Stone (RHUL), Paul Salmons (the IOE's Centre for Holocaust Education) and Prof Mark Roseman (Indiana University). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | 2012-05-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Holocaust, Narrative and Remembrance - Part One

Description

Part 1/2. Workshop with with Prof Dan Stone (RHUL), Paul Salmons (the IOE's Centre for Holocaust Education) and Prof Mark Roseman (Indiana University). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | historiography | Jew | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | history | 2012-05-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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šnder in conversation

Description

A discussion forum on writing Holocaust history with Prof Jane Caplan (St Antony's College, Oxford), Prof Mark Roseman (Indiana University) and Prof Nicholas Stargardt (Magdalen College, Oxford). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | humanities | Jewish | holocaust | war | wwii | Germany | world | nazi | humanitas | 2012-05-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Between Collectivism and Individualism

Description

The Reflection of the Israeli-German Relationship in Israeli Dance from the 1970s till Nowadays. Dana Mills, DPhil candidate in Political Theory, University of Oxford gives a talk for the OTJR seminar series, introduced by Phil Clark. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Israel | collectivism | dance | Germany | art | politics | individualism | Israel | collectivism | dance | Germany | art | politics | individualism | 2011-06-21

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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