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Infinity (MIT) Infinity (MIT)

Description

This course explores different kinds of infinity; the paradoxes of set theory; the reduction of arithmetic to logic; formal systems; paradoxes involving the concept of truth; Gödel’s incompleteness theorems; the nonformalizable nature of mathematical truth; and Turing machines. This course explores different kinds of infinity; the paradoxes of set theory; the reduction of arithmetic to logic; formal systems; paradoxes involving the concept of truth; Gödel’s incompleteness theorems; the nonformalizable nature of mathematical truth; and Turing machines.

Subjects

time travel | time travel | free will | free will | Newcomb | Newcomb | Newcomb's Paradox | Newcomb's Paradox | probability | probability | Zeno | Zeno | Zeno's Paradox | Zeno's Paradox | infinity | infinity | axiom of choice | axiom of choice | computability | computability | Godel | Godel | Godel's theorem | Godel's theorem | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma | higher infinite | higher infinite

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.118 Paradox and Infinity (MIT) 24.118 Paradox and Infinity (MIT)

Description

In this class we will study a cluster of puzzles, paradoxes and intellectual wonders - from Zeno's Paradox to Godel's Theorem - and discuss their philosophical implications. In this class we will study a cluster of puzzles, paradoxes and intellectual wonders - from Zeno's Paradox to Godel's Theorem - and discuss their philosophical implications.

Subjects

paradox | paradox | infinity | infinity | zeno | zeno | higher infinite | higher infinite | set theory | set theory | vagueness | vagueness | newcomb's puzzle | newcomb's puzzle | liar paradox | liar paradox | computability | computability | backward induction | backward induction | common knowledge | common knowledge | Godel's theorem | Godel's theorem | puzzle | puzzle

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Why study Ibn Taymiyya? Why study Ibn Taymiyya?

Description

Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328 C.E.) was an Islamic thinker who has exerted, and continues to exert, an enormous influence within Islamic thought. Taymiyya was often quoted by the late Osama Bin Laden and in this video, Jon Hoover, who has made a study of him and his importance in Islam, introduces Taymiyya and his thoughts. Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328 C.E.) was an Islamic thinker who has exerted, and continues to exert, an enormous influence within Islamic thought. Taymiyya was often quoted by the late Osama Bin Laden and in this video, Jon Hoover, who has made a study of him and his importance in Islam, introduces Taymiyya and his thoughts.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | God | God | Koran | Koran | Islam | Islam | Moslems | Moslems | Arabic | Arabic | Religion | Religion | theology | theology | belief | belief | Qur'an | Qur'an

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study icons? Why study icons?

Description

Icons – religious images from the eastern Churches – are far more than religious images as seen in western churches: they enable an encounter between the observer and the mystery. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them. Icons – religious images from the eastern Churches – are far more than religious images as seen in western churches: they enable an encounter between the observer and the mystery. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Orthodoxy | Orthodoxy | ukoer | ukoer | Christianity | Christianity | God | God | Jesus | Jesus | church | church | religion | religion | theology | theology | Eastern | Eastern | Greek | Greek

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study Orthodox Christianity? Why study Orthodox Christianity?

Description

Most English-speakers, when they think of Christianity, think only of its Latin, western forms, be they Catholic or Protestant. But this is only half the story: there are also all the churches of the East, often collectively referred to as ‘the Orthodox’. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them. Most English-speakers, when they think of Christianity, think only of its Latin, western forms, be they Catholic or Protestant. But this is only half the story: there are also all the churches of the East, often collectively referred to as ‘the Orthodox’. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Orthodoxy | Orthodoxy | Christianity | Christianity | God | God | Jesus | Jesus | church | church | religion | religion | theology | theology | belief | belief | Greek | Greek

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study Rudolf Bultmann? Why study Rudolf Bultmann?

Description

Rudolf Bultmann (1884-1976) was a German Lutheran theologian whose work highlighted the difficulties of treating early Christian texts as simple historical narratives, while at the same time highlighting their importance as documents of faith. Henri Gagey, from the Institut Catholique in Paris, is an expert on Bultmann’s theology and presents an introduction to it here. Rudolf Bultmann (1884-1976) was a German Lutheran theologian whose work highlighted the difficulties of treating early Christian texts as simple historical narratives, while at the same time highlighting their importance as documents of faith. Henri Gagey, from the Institut Catholique in Paris, is an expert on Bultmann’s theology and presents an introduction to it here.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Biblical | Biblical | Exegesis | Exegesis | History | History | Theology | Theology | Meaning | Meaning | Faith | Faith | Belief | Belief | Reason | Reason | God | God

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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24.00 Problems in Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems in Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two goals. First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. Here we look at a number of perennial philosophical problems, including some or all of: how knowledge differs from "mere opinion," the objectivity (or not) of moral judgment, logical paradoxes, mind/body relations, the nature and possibility of free will, and how a person remains the same over time, as their bodily and psychological traits change. The second goal is to get you thinking philosophically yourself. This will help you develop your critical and argumentative skills more generally. Readings will be from late, great classical authors and influential contemporary figures. The course has two goals. First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. Here we look at a number of perennial philosophical problems, including some or all of: how knowledge differs from "mere opinion," the objectivity (or not) of moral judgment, logical paradoxes, mind/body relations, the nature and possibility of free will, and how a person remains the same over time, as their bodily and psychological traits change. The second goal is to get you thinking philosophically yourself. This will help you develop your critical and argumentative skills more generally. Readings will be from late, great classical authors and influential contemporary figures.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | free will | free will | identity | identity | deontology | deontology | morality | morality | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | materialism | materialism | functionalism | functionalism | argument | argument | pascal's wager | pascal's wager | compatibilism | compatibilism | determinism | determinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT) STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT)

Description

This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime. This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime.

Subjects

modern japan | modern japan | transformation of japan | transformation of japan | nationalism | nationalism | japanese culture | japanese culture | postwar japan | postwar japan | anime | anime | japanese media | japanese media | japanese history | japanese history | modernization | modernization | cultural ideology | cultural ideology | Godzilla | Godzilla | technology transfer | technology transfer | shinkansen | shinkansen

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.052 French Film Classics (MIT) 21G.052 French Film Classics (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history and aesthetics of French cinema from the advent of sound to present-day. It treats films in the context of technical processes, the art of narration, directorial style, role of the scriptwriter, the development of schools and movements, the impact of political events and ideologies, and the relation between French and other national cinemas. Taught in English, the films are screened with English subtitles. Students may complete written assignments in French. This course covers the history and aesthetics of French cinema from the advent of sound to present-day. It treats films in the context of technical processes, the art of narration, directorial style, role of the scriptwriter, the development of schools and movements, the impact of political events and ideologies, and the relation between French and other national cinemas. Taught in English, the films are screened with English subtitles. Students may complete written assignments in French.

Subjects

France | France | french film | french film | the new wave | the new wave | René Clair | René Clair | Jean Epstein | Jean Epstein | La Grande Illusion | La Grande Illusion | Jean Renoir | Jean Renoir | The Left Bank | The Left Bank | 1970s Sex and Sectarianism | 1970s Sex and Sectarianism | Les Valseuses | Les Valseuses | Bertrand Blier | Bertrand Blier | Diva | Diva | Jean-Jacques Beineix | Jean-Jacques Beineix | cult film | cult film | cult classic | cult classic | Maghrebi-French (Beur) | Maghrebi-French (Beur) | Amélie | Amélie | popular Film | popular Film | Cluzot | Cluzot | Le corbeau | Le corbeau | Funny Face | Funny Face | Stanley Donen | Stanley Donen | Jacques Cousteau | Jacques Cousteau | BarthesCésaire | BarthesCésaire | Roger Vadim | Roger Vadim | François Truffaut | François Truffaut | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Breathless: Jean-Luc Godard | Breathless: Jean-Luc Godard | Les Aventures de Rabbi Jacob | Les Aventures de Rabbi Jacob | Gérard Oury | Gérard Oury | Nikita | Nikita | Jean-Luc Besson | Jean-Luc Besson | La Haine | La Haine | Mattheiu Kassovitz | Mattheiu Kassovitz | Intouchables | Intouchables | Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache | Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache | Bande de filles | Bande de filles | Céline Sciamma | Céline Sciamma | Realism | Realism | the Popular Frot | the Popular Frot | Liberation | Liberation | Henri Langlois and the Cinémathèque française | Henri Langlois and the Cinémathèque française | Les parapluies de Cherboug | Les parapluies de Cherboug | Jacques Demy | Jacques Demy | Brigitte Bardot | Brigitte Bardot | Catherine Deneuve | Catherine Deneuve

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Infinity (MIT)

Description

This course explores different kinds of infinity; the paradoxes of set theory; the reduction of arithmetic to logic; formal systems; paradoxes involving the concept of truth; Gdel’s incompleteness theorems; the nonformalizable nature of mathematical truth; and Turing machines.

Subjects

time travel | free will | Newcomb | Newcomb's Paradox | probability | Zeno | Zeno's Paradox | infinity | axiom of choice | computability | Godel | Godel's theorem | prisoner's dilemma | higher infinite

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.995 Special Topics in Literature: Milton's "Paradise Lost" (MIT) 21L.995 Special Topics in Literature: Milton's "Paradise Lost" (MIT)

Description

In this 3-unit class, we will read Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost. The goal of the class is for students to come away feeling comfortable with its language and argument; meeting in a small group will also allow us to talk about the key questions and issues raised by the poem. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. In this 3-unit class, we will read Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost. The goal of the class is for students to come away feeling comfortable with its language and argument; meeting in a small group will also allow us to talk about the key questions and issues raised by the poem. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | John Milton: Lucifer | John Milton: Lucifer | Adam and Eve | Adam and Eve | Genesis | Genesis | Fallen Angel | Fallen Angel | sin | sin | bible | bible | William Blake | William Blake | merit | merit | thee and thou | thee and thou | Satan | Satan | angel | angel | Urania | Urania | Bellerophon | Bellerophon | Orpheus | Orpheus | Garden of Eden | Garden of Eden | forbidden fruit | forbidden fruit | God | God | Beelzebub | Beelzebub | angels | angels | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | Raphael | Raphael | serpent | serpent | Michael | Michael | creation | creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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British prime ministers 1783 - 1852 British prime ministers 1783 - 1852

Description

Subjects

UNow | UNow | British prime ministers 1783-1852 | British prime ministers 1783-1852 | ukoer | ukoer | Addington | Addington | Canning | Canning | Goderich | Goderich | Grenville | Grenville | Grey | Grey | Peel | Peel | Perceval | Perceval | Pitt | Pitt

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing. In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips. This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.611 Foundations of Theater Practice (MIT) 21M.611 Foundations of Theater Practice (MIT)

Description

The goals of this class are two-fold: the first is to experience the creative processes and storytelling behind several of theater's arts and to acquire the analytical skills necessary in assessing the meaning they transmit when they come together in production. Secondly, we will introduce you to these languages in a creative way by giving you hands-on experience in each. To that end, several Visiting Artists and MIT faculty in Theater Arts will guest lecture, lead workshops, and give you practical instruction in their individual art forms. The goals of this class are two-fold: the first is to experience the creative processes and storytelling behind several of theater's arts and to acquire the analytical skills necessary in assessing the meaning they transmit when they come together in production. Secondly, we will introduce you to these languages in a creative way by giving you hands-on experience in each. To that end, several Visiting Artists and MIT faculty in Theater Arts will guest lecture, lead workshops, and give you practical instruction in their individual art forms.

Subjects

set design | set design | costuming | costuming | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | acting | acting | film | film | scripts | scripts | live theater | live theater | textual analysis | textual analysis | narrative structure | narrative structure | media adaptations | media adaptations | Waiting for Godot | Waiting for Godot | Macbeth | Macbeth

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally. The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | problems | problems | philosophers | philosophers | think | think | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | freewill | freewill | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | standards | standards | moral conduct | moral conduct | history | history | contemporary authors | contemporary authors | skills | skills | critical | critical | argumentative | argumentative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Faust | Liszt | Liszt | Berlioz | Berlioz | Murnau | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | Turn of the Screw | magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introducing the philosophy of religion Introducing the philosophy of religion

Description

In this free course, Introducing the philosophy of religion, Timothy Chappell, Professor of Philosophy, asks what the words 'God' and 'religion' mean, and what it means to ask philosophical questions about them. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Introducing the philosophy of religion. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 In this free course, Introducing the philosophy of religion, Timothy Chappell, Professor of Philosophy, asks what the words 'God' and 'religion' mean, and what it means to ask philosophical questions about them. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Introducing the philosophy of religion. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Religious Studies | Religious Studies | God | God | religion | religion | A222_1. | A222_1.

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Religion | Science | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | History | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | development | God theory of evolution | science | theological explanation | universe | creatures | faith | and theology | purpose of evolution | Design | models | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Religion | Science | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | History | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | development | God theory of evolution | science | theological explanation | universe | creatures | faith | and theology | purpose of evolution | Design | models | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | problems | philosophers | think | existence | God | reason | faith | mind-body | freewill | moral responsibility | standards | moral conduct | history | contemporary authors | skills | critical | argumentative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.995 Special Topics in Literature: Milton's "Paradise Lost" (MIT)

Description

In this 3-unit class, we will read Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost. The goal of the class is for students to come away feeling comfortable with its language and argument; meeting in a small group will also allow us to talk about the key questions and issues raised by the poem. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

Paradise Lost | John Milton: Lucifer | Adam and Eve | Genesis | Fallen Angel | sin | bible | William Blake | merit | thee and thou | Satan | angel | Urania | Bellerophon | Orpheus | Garden of Eden | forbidden fruit | God | Beelzebub | angels | heaven | hell | Raphael | serpent | Michael | creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.118 Paradox and Infinity (MIT)

Description

In this class we will study a cluster of puzzles, paradoxes and intellectual wonders - from Zeno's Paradox to Godel's Theorem - and discuss their philosophical implications.

Subjects

paradox | infinity | zeno | higher infinite | set theory | vagueness | newcomb's puzzle | liar paradox | computability | backward induction | common knowledge | Godel's theorem | puzzle

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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