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Art in Renaissance Venice Art in Renaissance Venice

Description

This free course, Art in Renaissance Venice, considers the art of Renaissance Venice and how such art was determined in many ways by the city's geographical location and ethnically diverse population. Studying Venice and its art offers a challenge to the conventional notion of Renaissance art as an entirely Italian phenomenon. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Art in Renaissance Venice. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Art in Renaissance Venice, considers the art of Renaissance Venice and how such art was determined in many ways by the city's geographical location and ethnically diverse population. Studying Venice and its art offers a challenge to the conventional notion of Renaissance art as an entirely Italian phenomenon. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Art in Renaissance Venice. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Visual Art | Visual Art | Venice | Venice | renaissance | renaissance | Gothic | Gothic | habits | habits | Norbert Elias | Norbert Elias | free trade | free trade | Bob Phillips | Bob Phillips | AA315_1 | AA315_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | Rethinking texts and genres | Rethinking texts and genres | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | German fairy tales | German fairy tales | Scientific discovery tales | Scientific discovery tales | Frankenstein (1831) | Frankenstein (1831) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Fun Home (2006). | Fun Home (2006).

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Description

Video from Derek Gladwin's lecture in February 2015. Video from Derek Gladwin's lecture in February 2015.

Subjects

Derek Gladwin | Derek Gladwin | lecture | lecture | Repetition Compulsion | Repetition Compulsion | video | video | Beauvoir | Beauvoir | C19th | C19th | C20th | C20th | Feminism | Feminism | Gilman | Gilman | Gothic | Gothic | the second sex | the second sex | The Yellow Wall-Paper | The Yellow Wall-Paper | The Yellow Wallpaper | The Yellow Wallpaper

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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Art in Renaissance Venice

Description

This free course considers the art of Renaissance Venice and how such art was determined in many ways by the city's geographical location and ethnically diverse population. Studying Venice and its art offers a challenge to the conventional notion of Renaissance art as an entirely Italian phenomenon.

Subjects

Visual Art | Venice | renaissance | Gothic | habits | Norbert Elias | free trade | Bob Phillips

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw

Subjects

21L.000 | 21W.734 | Rethinking texts and genres | ?s rewrite of Milton?s Paradise Lost | German fairy tales | Scientific discovery tales | Frankenstein (1831) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | ?s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Fun Home (2006).

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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Art in Renaissance Venice

Description

This free course considers the art of Renaissance Venice and how such art was determined in many ways by the city's geographical location and ethnically diverse population. Studying Venice and its art offers a challenge to the conventional notion of Renaissance art as an entirely Italian phenomenon.

Subjects

Visual Art | Venice | renaissance | Gothic | habits | Norbert Elias | free trade | Bob Phillips

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/feeds/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

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