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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT) 21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture. This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | contemporary India | film | film | writers | writers | IT revolution | IT revolution | documentaries | documentaries | Indian culture | Indian culture | globalization | globalization | Indian cities | Indian cities | political events | political events | social events | social events | nationhood | nationhood | gender and class issues | gender and class issues | rural India | rural India | urban India | urban India | Devdas | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT) 21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences. This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences.

Subjects

Bipan Chandra | Bipan Chandra | Ismat Chugtai | Ismat Chugtai | Mahasweta Devi | Mahasweta Devi | Nayantara Sahgal | Nayantara Sahgal | Amartya Sen | Amartya Sen | directors | directors | film | film | writers | writers | leading parallel film makers | leading parallel film makers | Shyam Benegal | Shyam Benegal | Shekhar Kapoor | Shekhar Kapoor | Govind Nihalani | Govind Nihalani | Satyajit Ray | Satyajit Ray | IT revolution | IT revolution | documentaries | documentaries | Indian culture | Indian culture | globalization | globalization | Indian cities | Indian cities | political events | political events | social events | social events | negotiating the "system" in India | negotiating the "system" in India | ideology of a "new Indian" | ideology of a "new Indian"

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences.

Subjects

Bipan Chandra | Ismat Chugtai | Mahasweta Devi | Nayantara Sahgal | Amartya Sen | directors | film | writers | leading parallel film makers | Shyam Benegal | Shekhar Kapoor | Govind Nihalani | Satyajit Ray | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | negotiating the "system" in India | ideology of a "new Indian"

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.225 Economy and Business in Modern China and India (MIT) 15.225 Economy and Business in Modern China and India (MIT)

Description

As markets or production bases, China and India are becoming important and integral players in the global economy. Foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investments and outsourcing businesses have increased dramatically in these two economies. Despite the rising importance of these two economies on the world stage, our knowledge and analysis of these two countries in an integrated manner has remained poor. The two are often lumped together by business analysts as "emerging markets," despite the substantial differences in their political systems, reform policies and business organizations. Academics, in contrast, have tended to treat the two countries separately, preferring to specialize in issues and questions specific to one or the other country. The purpose of this course is to an As markets or production bases, China and India are becoming important and integral players in the global economy. Foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investments and outsourcing businesses have increased dramatically in these two economies. Despite the rising importance of these two economies on the world stage, our knowledge and analysis of these two countries in an integrated manner has remained poor. The two are often lumped together by business analysts as "emerging markets," despite the substantial differences in their political systems, reform policies and business organizations. Academics, in contrast, have tended to treat the two countries separately, preferring to specialize in issues and questions specific to one or the other country. The purpose of this course is to an

Subjects

China | China | India | India | global economy | global economy | growth | growth | foreign direct investment | foreign direct investment | portfolio investments | portfolio investments | emerging markets | emerging markets | reform policies | reform policies | business environment | business environment | financing environment | financing environment | corruption | corruption | business government relationship | business government relationship | venture capital | venture capital | private equity | private equity | intellectual property | intellectual property | India pharmaceutical industry | India pharmaceutical industry | development models. | development models.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.485 Modern Fiction (MIT) 21L.485 Modern Fiction (MIT)

Description

Tradition and innovation in representative fiction of the early modern period. Recurring themes include the role of the artist in the modern period; the representation of psychological and sexual experience; and the virtues (and defects) of the aggressively experimental character. Works by Conrad, Kipling, Babel, Kafka, James, Lawrence, Mann, Ford Madox Ford, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Nabokov. Tradition and innovation in representative fiction of the early modern period. Recurring themes include the role of the artist in the modern period; the representation of psychological and sexual experience; and the virtues (and defects) of the aggressively experimental character. Works by Conrad, Kipling, Babel, Kafka, James, Lawrence, Mann, Ford Madox Ford, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Nabokov.

Subjects

Thomas Hardy | Thomas Hardy | Jude the Obscure | Jude the Obscure | Joseph Conrad | Joseph Conrad | Lord Jim | Lord Jim | Rudyard Kipling | Rudyard Kipling | Kim | Kim | Ford Madox Ford | Ford Madox Ford | The Good Soldier | The Good Soldier | James Joyce | James Joyce | A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man | A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man | E.M. Forster | E.M. Forster | A Passage to India | A Passage to India | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | To the Lighthouse | To the Lighthouse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.ES718 Global Health Innovation: Delivering Targeted Advice to an Organization in the Field (MIT) 15.ES718 Global Health Innovation: Delivering Targeted Advice to an Organization in the Field (MIT)

Description

In this three-day workshop, students will get a broad introduction to global health issues. We will look at one particular non-governmental organization in India that works to improve health across the lifespan by empowering existing community resources to provide appropriate physical, psychological and social therapies, focusing on child development, adolescent and youth health, mental health, and chronic disease. This workshop equips student to explore novel ideas and technologies with an inspiring and ground-breaking Indian NGO.Fulfills the Sloan Innovation Period (SIP) elective requirement. SIP occurs at the midpoint of each semester providing students with an intensive week of experiential leadership learning, as well as exposure to groundbreaking faculty work. It allows students In this three-day workshop, students will get a broad introduction to global health issues. We will look at one particular non-governmental organization in India that works to improve health across the lifespan by empowering existing community resources to provide appropriate physical, psychological and social therapies, focusing on child development, adolescent and youth health, mental health, and chronic disease. This workshop equips student to explore novel ideas and technologies with an inspiring and ground-breaking Indian NGO.Fulfills the Sloan Innovation Period (SIP) elective requirement. SIP occurs at the midpoint of each semester providing students with an intensive week of experiential leadership learning, as well as exposure to groundbreaking faculty work. It allows students

Subjects

innovation | innovation | global health | global health | globalhealth | globalhealth | organization | organization | ngo | ngo | health services | health services | chronic care | chronic care | health workers | health workers | lay workers | lay workers | non-traditional methods | non-traditional methods | startup | startup | India | India | healthcare | healthcare | materinal health | materinal health | Vikram Patel | Vikram Patel | Sangath | Sangath | community | community | mental health | mental health | Dimagi | Dimagi | mPower | mPower | ginger.io | ginger.io | Centre for Affordable Healthcare Technology at Oxford University | Centre for Affordable Healthcare Technology at Oxford University | MGH Center for Global Health’s CamTECH Consortium | MGH Center for Global Health’s CamTECH Consortium | Partners in Health | Partners in Health | MIT Media Lab | MIT Media Lab | the Global Health Delivery Project at Harvard | the Global Health Delivery Project at Harvard | eHealth Systems | eHealth Systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Composition and improvisation in cross-cultural perspective Composition and improvisation in cross-cultural perspective

Description

Improvisation and composition are words frequently used in the western world to describe the creation of music. But are they really two distinct processes, or are they aspects of the same phenomenon? In this free course, Composition and improvisation in cross-cultural perspective, we will explore the relationship between the two using examples of Asian music to help us clarify the concepts. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Composition and improvisation in cross-cultural perspective. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Improvisation and composition are words frequently used in the western world to describe the creation of music. But are they really two distinct processes, or are they aspects of the same phenomenon? In this free course, Composition and improvisation in cross-cultural perspective, we will explore the relationship between the two using examples of Asian music to help us clarify the concepts. First published on Fri, 15 Jan 2016 as Composition and improvisation in cross-cultural perspective. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Music | Music | India | India | AA302_1 | AA302_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Law restricting online speech struck down in India Law restricting online speech struck down in India

Description

Max Harris examines a historic judgment by India’s Supreme Court and its lessons for other countries. Max Harris examines a historic judgment by India’s Supreme Court and its lessons for other countries.

Subjects

Uncategorized | Uncategorized | India | India | Internet | Internet | Law | Law | United Kingdom | United Kingdom

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT) 21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT)

Description

From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s. From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s.

Subjects

History | History | europe | europe | european | european | imperialism | imperialism | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | political | political | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | Africa | Africa | India | India | Asia | Asia | imperial expansion | imperial expansion | the rise of "scientific" racism | the rise of "scientific" racism | national identities | national identities | social class | social class | gender | gender | colonial ideologies | colonial ideologies | colonial rule | colonial rule | decolonization | decolonization | globalization | globalization | post-colonial world. | post-colonial world.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others. This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others.

Subjects

challenge | challenge | world poverty | world poverty | economics | economics | per capita income | per capita income | health | health | fertility | fertility | mortality | mortality | birth | birth | death | death | microfinance | microfinance | NGOs | NGOs | poor | poor | education | education | colonialism | colonialism | globalization | globalization | corruption | corruption | India | India | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | economic growth | economic growth | development | development | credit markets | credit markets | prosperity | prosperity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT) 21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT)

Description

This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales. This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales.

Subjects

england | england | britain | britain | culture | culture | history | history | monarchy | monarchy | windsor | windsor | hanover | hanover | george III | george III | George IV | George IV | victoria | victoria | albert | albert | prince | prince | queen | queen | king | king | edward VIII | edward VIII | diana | diana | princess | princess | dynasty | dynasty | politics | politics | william IV | william IV | empire | empire | elizabeth | elizabeth | George IV | victoria | George IV | victoria | Britain | Britain | British | British | Hanover | Hanover | Windsor | Windsor | 1714 | 1714 | crises | crises | George III | George III | scandal | scandal | Victoria | Victoria | Albert | Albert | abdication | abdication | Edward VIII | Edward VIII | Diana | Diana | Wales | Wales | portraits | portraits | news footage | news footage | films | films | Tudors | Tudors | Stuarts | Stuarts | pageantry | pageantry | royal | royal | George I | George I | George II | George II | England | England | Germany | Germany | regent | regent | William IV | William IV | empress | empress | India | India | Edward VII | Edward VII | George V | George V | war | war | George VI | George VI | Elizabeth II | Elizabeth II | British politics | British politics | British culture | British culture | Accession | Accession | House of Hanover | House of Hanover | House of Windsor | House of Windsor | political | political | mental illness | mental illness | public life | public life | Prince Albert | Prince Albert | Princess of Wales | Princess of Wales | German Kings | German Kings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT) 11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT)

Description

This course studies the interaction between law, courts, and social movements in shaping domestic and global public policy. Examines how groups mobilize to use law to affect change and why they succeed and fail. The class uses case studies to explore the interplay between law, social movements, and public policy in current areas such as gender, race, labor, trade, environment, and human rights. Finally, it introduces the theories of public policy, social movements, law and society, and transnational studies. This course studies the interaction between law, courts, and social movements in shaping domestic and global public policy. Examines how groups mobilize to use law to affect change and why they succeed and fail. The class uses case studies to explore the interplay between law, social movements, and public policy in current areas such as gender, race, labor, trade, environment, and human rights. Finally, it introduces the theories of public policy, social movements, law and society, and transnational studies.

Subjects

law | law | social movements | social movements | public policy | public policy | comparative | comparative | international | international | Occupy Wall Street | Occupy Wall Street | gender | gender | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | social justice | social justice | human rights | human rights | feminism | feminism | women's rights | women's rights | India | India | United States | United States | labor | labor | economics | economics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Julian Thompson on Rudyard Kipling

Description

Dr Julian Thompson considers a writer described by Kingsley Amis as 'our greatest writer of short stories'. In this discussion of Rudyard Kipling, Julian acknowledges Kipling's lack popularity with readers, but argues for the greatness of short stories from across his ouvre and positions them as precursors to modernism. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | anglo-Indian writing | T.S. Eliot | Chaucerian forgery | modernism | Victorian | Rudyard Kipling | short stories | #greatwriters | anglo-Indian writing | T.S. Eliot | Chaucerian forgery | modernism | Victorian | Rudyard Kipling | short stories

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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15.225 Economy and Business in Modern China and India (MIT)

Description

As markets or production bases, China and India are becoming important and integral players in the global economy. Foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investments and outsourcing businesses have increased dramatically in these two economies. Despite the rising importance of these two economies on the world stage, our knowledge and analysis of these two countries in an integrated manner has remained poor. The two are often lumped together by business analysts as "emerging markets," despite the substantial differences in their political systems, reform policies and business organizations. Academics, in contrast, have tended to treat the two countries separately, preferring to specialize in issues and questions specific to one or the other country. The purpose of this course is to an

Subjects

China | India | global economy | growth | foreign direct investment | portfolio investments | emerging markets | reform policies | business environment | financing environment | corruption | business government relationship | venture capital | private equity | intellectual property | India pharmaceutical industry | development models.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.S07 GlobalHealth Lab (MIT) 15.S07 GlobalHealth Lab (MIT)

Description

This course pairs faculty-mentored student teams with enterprises on the front lines of health care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. To tackle specific barriers identified by each partnering organization, the course is built around custom-designed projects in strategy, business model innovation, operations, marketing, and technology. Class sessions include interactive cases, practical exercises, and lively conversations with experts, all designed to support project work before, during, and after the intensive two-week onsite collaboration with entrepreneurs, leaders, staff, and stakeholders in the setting. Course assignments include a portfolio of host deliverable, a foundational toolkit designed to support each project, and a distillation of learning from the field. Acknowle This course pairs faculty-mentored student teams with enterprises on the front lines of health care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. To tackle specific barriers identified by each partnering organization, the course is built around custom-designed projects in strategy, business model innovation, operations, marketing, and technology. Class sessions include interactive cases, practical exercises, and lively conversations with experts, all designed to support project work before, during, and after the intensive two-week onsite collaboration with entrepreneurs, leaders, staff, and stakeholders in the setting. Course assignments include a portfolio of host deliverable, a foundational toolkit designed to support each project, and a distillation of learning from the field. Acknowle

Subjects

global health | global health | healthcare | healthcare | health delivery | health delivery | action lab | action lab | Africa | Africa | India | India | clinic | clinic | hospital | hospital | revenue model | revenue model | business model | business model | cost analysis | cost analysis | strategy | strategy | operations | operations | marketing | marketing | technology | technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.53 Democratization in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (MIT) 17.53 Democratization in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (MIT)

Description

Recent years have seen an astonishing spread of democracy to many African, Asian, and Latin American countries. What caused these dramatic political transitions? What challenges do democratizing countries in the Third World face? Will these new democracies endure? We will take up these questions using film, fiction, and popular journalism, as well as scholarly research. We will also focus on a small number of countries (Brazil, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Senegal, Singapore, and Sri Lanka) in order to explore in greater depth some of the most important political challenges faced by developing countries. Although the class focuses on the developing world, many of the lessons should "travel" to democratizing countries in other regions. Recent years have seen an astonishing spread of democracy to many African, Asian, and Latin American countries. What caused these dramatic political transitions? What challenges do democratizing countries in the Third World face? Will these new democracies endure? We will take up these questions using film, fiction, and popular journalism, as well as scholarly research. We will also focus on a small number of countries (Brazil, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Senegal, Singapore, and Sri Lanka) in order to explore in greater depth some of the most important political challenges faced by developing countries. Although the class focuses on the developing world, many of the lessons should "travel" to democratizing countries in other regions.

Subjects

Sri Lanka | Sri Lanka | Singapore | Singapore | Senegal | Senegal | Nigeria | Nigeria | Mexico | Mexico | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Third World | Third World | Latin America | Latin America | Asian | Asian | Africa | Africa | Democracy | Democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.382 Capitalism in the Age of Revolution (MIT)

Description

The decades leading up to the Atlantic revolutions of the late eighteenth century were formative moments in the rise of capitalism. The novel instruments of credit, debt, and investment fashioned during this period proved to be enduring sources of financial innovation, but they also generated a great deal of political conflict, particularly during the revolutionary era itself.  This seminar examines the debates surrounding large-scale financial and trading corporations and considers the eighteenth century as a period of recurring financial crisis in which corporate power came into sustained and direct contact with emerging republican norms. The seminar ends with a look at the relationship between slavery and the rise of “modern” or “industrial” capitalism in

Subjects

capitalism | revolution | monopoly | trading | stock market | financial crisis | Mississippi Bubble | John Law | slave trade | South Sea Bubble | French public finance | France | Persian Letters | Cato's letters | Dutch East India Company | Sovereignty | East Indies | French India Company | American Revolution | 1764 Currency Act | Boston Tea Party | Compagnie des Indes | French revolution | Paris bourse | Sciotomanie | Global Financial Origins of 1789 | Maxmilien Robespierre

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT) SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu

Subjects

development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Honduras | Honduras | Zambia | Zambia | Lesotho | Lesotho | Nicaragua | Nicaragua | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | poverty | poverty | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | AIDS | AIDS | solar water disinfection | solar water disinfection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT) EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

EC.701 | EC.701 | 11.025 | 11.025 | 11.472 | 11.472 | development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | China | China | India | India | Rwanda | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Tanzania | Africa | Africa | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | stove | stove | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | World Bank | World Bank | NGO | NGO | United Nations | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4D | ICT4C | ICT4C | microfinance | microfinance | micro-finance | micro-finance | AIDS | AIDS | HIV | HIV | wind power | wind power | solar power | solar power | biomass | biomass | biodiesel | biodiesel | biogas | biogas | agriculture | agriculture | farming | farming | food | food | green revolution | green revolution | millenium development goals | millenium development goals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Law restricting online speech struck down in India Law restricting online speech struck down in India

Description

Max Harris examines a historic judgment by India’s Supreme Court and its lessons for other countries. Max Harris examines a historic judgment by India’s Supreme Court and its lessons for other countries.

Subjects

Uncategorized | Uncategorized | India | India | Internet | Internet | Law | Law | United Kingdom | United Kingdom

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | Corruption | Corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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