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11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT) 11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT)

Description

This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future. This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future.

Subjects

planning | planning | politics | politics | post-conflict reconstruction | post-conflict reconstruction | Marshall Plan | Marshall Plan | reconstruction of Japan | reconstruction of Japan | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Bosnia and Herzegovina | September 11 reconstruction | September 11 reconstruction | Iraq politics and society | Iraq politics and society | post-war planning | post-war planning | building democracy | building democracy | international organizations | international organizations | Iraqi-Arab discourse | Iraqi-Arab discourse | vision | vision | stability | stability | resistance | resistance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.582 Civil War (MIT) 17.582 Civil War (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. It studies the origins of civil war, discusses variables affecting duration, and examines termination of conflict. This subject is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases, although with concentration on various Balkan civil wars. This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. It studies the origins of civil war, discusses variables affecting duration, and examines termination of conflict. This subject is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases, although with concentration on various Balkan civil wars.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social science | social science | civil war | civil war | origins | origins | duration | duration | termination | termination | conflict | conflict | Balkan | Balkan | World Bank | World Bank | Identity | Identity | fear | fear | greed | greed | death | death | intervention | intervention | peace | peace | Columbia | Columbia | Sudan | Sudan | Iraq | Iraq | El Salvador | El Salvador | South Africa | South Africa

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad? This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy | WWI | WWI | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.953 U.S. Budgets for National Security (MIT) 17.953 U.S. Budgets for National Security (MIT)

Description

This course is for students who want to know how the dollars we spend on national security relate to military forces, systems, and policy choices, and who wish to develop a personal tool kit for framing and assessing defense policy alternatives. This course is for students who want to know how the dollars we spend on national security relate to military forces, systems, and policy choices, and who wish to develop a personal tool kit for framing and assessing defense policy alternatives.

Subjects

United States | United States | national defense | national defense | homeland security | homeland security | military operations | military operations | budget | budget | military forces | military forces | systems | systems | policy | policy | strategy | strategy | spending | spending | terrorism | terrorism | military pay | military pay | military benefits | military benefits | federal spending | federal spending | infrastructure | infrastructure | readiness | readiness | alternative | alternative | defense | defense | Iraq war | Iraq war | foreign aid | foreign aid | national security | national security | defense budget | defense budget

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT) 17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence. This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | U.S. Intelligence Community | U.S. Intelligence Community | national security | national security | policymakers | policymakers | future role | future role | 9/11 | 9/11 | Iraq | Iraq | national intelligence | national intelligence | National Security Act of 1947 | National Security Act of 1947

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.405 Seminar on Politics and Conflict in the Middle East (MIT) 17.405 Seminar on Politics and Conflict in the Middle East (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on evolution of contemporary politics and economics. The subject is divided into four parts: Context: historical and strategic perspectives, theoretical issues, and sources and forms of conflict; Continuity: detailed analysis conflicts systems and their persistence, as well as regional competition and recent wars – focusing on specific countries and cases; Complexity: highlighting situation specific strategic gains and losses; and Convergence: focusing future configurations of conflict and cooperation. Throughout the course, special attention is given to sources and transformations of power, population dynamics and migration, resources and energy, as well as implications of technological change. This course focuses on evolution of contemporary politics and economics. The subject is divided into four parts: Context: historical and strategic perspectives, theoretical issues, and sources and forms of conflict; Continuity: detailed analysis conflicts systems and their persistence, as well as regional competition and recent wars – focusing on specific countries and cases; Complexity: highlighting situation specific strategic gains and losses; and Convergence: focusing future configurations of conflict and cooperation. Throughout the course, special attention is given to sources and transformations of power, population dynamics and migration, resources and energy, as well as implications of technological change.

Subjects

middle east | middle east | contemporary politics | contemporary politics | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | economics | economics | history | history | domestic policy | domestic policy | regional politics | regional politics | power | power | war | war | peace | peace | negotiation | negotiation | Iraq | Iraq | nation state | nation state | arab | arab | israel | israel | lebanon | lebanon | jordan | jordan | palestine | palestine | persian gulf | persian gulf | saudia arabia | saudia arabia | turkey | turkey | iran | iran | egypt | egypt | sudan | sudan | north africa | north africa | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | population dynamics | population dynamics | migration | migration | natural resources | natural resources | energy | energy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT) 17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power. This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subjects

military intervention | military intervention | post Cold War | post Cold War | internal conflict | internal conflict | Kurds | Kurds | Iraq | Iraq | Somalia | Somalia | Bosnia | Bosnia | Serbia | Serbia | Kosovo | Kosovo | Libya | Libya | Rwanda | Rwanda | Darfur | Darfur | Sudan | Sudan | United States | United States | civil war | civil war | political strategies | political strategies | failing states | failing states | foreign policy | foreign policy | NATO | NATO | genocide | genocide | refugee | refugee | sanctions | sanctions | political reconstruction | political reconstruction | peacekeeping | peacekeeping | humanitarian intervention | humanitarian intervention | the Balkans | the Balkans | Gaddafi | Gaddafi | preventive diplomacy | preventive diplomacy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.952 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT) 17.952 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states during the 1990's. Yet, these interventions were usually not motivated by obvious classical vital interests. Given the extraordinary security enjoyed by the great and middle powers of the west in the Cold War's aftermath, these activities are puzzling. The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states during the 1990's. Yet, these interventions were usually not motivated by obvious classical vital interests. Given the extraordinary security enjoyed by the great and middle powers of the west in the Cold War's aftermath, these activities are puzzling.

Subjects

Power | Power | military | military | intervention | intervention | civil | civil | war | war | policy | policy | security | security | cold war | cold war | United States | United States | combat | combat | peace enforcement | peace enforcement | Kurds | Kurds | Iraq | Iraq | Somalia | Somalia | Aristide | Aristide | Haiti | Haiti | Bosnia | Bosnia | Herzegovina | Herzegovina | NATO | NATO | Serbia | Serbia | Kosovo | Kosovo | Croatia | Croatia | genocide | genocide | Rwanda | Rwanda | strategy | strategy | United Nations | United Nations | Europe | Europe | Media | Media | Journalism | Journalism | Non Government Organizations | Non Government Organizations | NGOs | NGOs | sanctions | sanctions | political theory | political theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries. This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries.

Subjects

democracy | democracy | economic development | economic development | politics | politics | Germany | Germany | Iraq | Iraq | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | Middle East | Middle East | Latin America | Latin America | Africa | Africa | South Asia | South Asia | East Asia | East Asia | Greece | Greece | Aristotle | Aristotle | foreign affairs | foreign affairs | Lee Kuan Yew | Lee Kuan Yew | democratic institution | democratic institution | social divisions | social divisions | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | Karl Marx | Karl Marx | Communist Party | Communist Party | leadership | leadership | polarization | polarization | gridlock | gridlock | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Weimar Republic | Weimar Republic | imposed sovereignty | imposed sovereignty | Austri | Austri | regime breakdown | regime breakdown | Brazil | Brazil | capitalism | capitalism | industrial policy | industrial policy | women's emancipation | women's emancipation | women's suffrage | women's suffrage | Athens | Athens | the Constitution | the Constitution | reform | reform | presidentialism | presidentialism | federalism | federalism | bicameralism | bicameralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT) 21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities. This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities.

Subjects

Middle East | Middle East | history | history | Ottoman period | Ottoman period | imperialism | imperialism | nation-state | nation-state | Turkey | Turkey | Egypt | Egypt | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Islam | Islam | Iranian Revolution | Iranian Revolution | democracy | democracy | Orientalism | Orientalism | Western Imperialism | Western Imperialism | World War I | World War I | Great War | Great War | Nationalism | Nationalism | Israel | Israel | Palestine | Palestine | Islamic radicalism | Islamic radicalism | Hamas | Hamas | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Isis | Isis | Iraq | Iraq | Yezidis | Yezidis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT)

Description

This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future.

Subjects

planning | politics | post-conflict reconstruction | Marshall Plan | reconstruction of Japan | Bosnia and Herzegovina | September 11 reconstruction | Iraq politics and society | post-war planning | building democracy | international organizations | Iraqi-Arab discourse | vision | stability | resistance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.952 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states during the 1990's. Yet, these interventions were usually not motivated by obvious classical vital interests. Given the extraordinary security enjoyed by the great and middle powers of the west in the Cold War's aftermath, these activities are puzzling.

Subjects

Power | military | intervention | civil | war | policy | security | cold war | United States | combat | peace enforcement | Kurds | Iraq | Somalia | Aristide | Haiti | Bosnia | Herzegovina | NATO | Serbia | Kosovo | Croatia | genocide | Rwanda | strategy | United Nations | Europe | Media | Journalism | Non Government Organizations | NGOs | sanctions | political theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.952 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states during the 1990's. Yet, these interventions were usually not motivated by obvious classical vital interests. Given the extraordinary security enjoyed by the great and middle powers of the west in the Cold War's aftermath, these activities are puzzling.

Subjects

Power | military | intervention | civil | war | policy | security | cold war | United States | combat | peace enforcement | Kurds | Iraq | Somalia | Aristide | Haiti | Bosnia | Herzegovina | NATO | Serbia | Kosovo | Croatia | genocide | Rwanda | strategy | United Nations | Europe | Media | Journalism | Non Government Organizations | NGOs | sanctions | political theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Politics, media and war: 9/11 and its aftermaths

Description

The terrorist attacks of 9/11 not only cost some 3,000 lives they also deeply scarred the American consciousness and made a deep impact on US foreign policy and the world at large. This free course media and war: 9/11 and its aftermaths assesses the wider consequences of 9/11 not just on domestic and world politics but also on the media.

Subjects

Politics | 9/11 | Iraq

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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The USA, power and international order: Foreign policy under Obama

Description

President Obama's inauguration in 2009 seemed to herald a new era in US foreign policy and international relations. But the Bush years had left a formidable set of problems war in Iraq and Afghanistan nuclear proliferation in Iran and the rise of China. In this free course The USA power and international order: Foreign policy under Obama you will explore these challenges facing the USA. You will learn about the position of the USA in the international system how to analyse US economic and political power in international politics and be able to make sense of constraints on and choices open to US policy in the 21st century.

Subjects

Politics | Iraq | Afghanistan | terrorism | China | DU301_2

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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Politics, media and war: 9/11 and its aftermaths

Description

The terrorist attacks of 9/11 not only cost some 3,000 lives, they also deeply scarred the American consciousness and made a deep impact on US foreign policy and the world at large. This free course, Politics, media and war: 9/11 and its aftermaths, assesses the wider consequences of 9/11 not just on domestic and world politics, but also on the media. First published on Tue, 26 Apr 2016 as Politics, media and war: 9/11 and its aftermaths. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Politics | 9/11 | Iraq

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.952 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states during the 1990's. Yet, these interventions were usually not motivated by obvious classical vital interests. Given the extraordinary security enjoyed by the great and middle powers of the west in the Cold War's aftermath, these activities are puzzling.

Subjects

Power | military | intervention | civil | war | policy | security | cold war | United States | combat | peace enforcement | Kurds | Iraq | Somalia | Aristide | Haiti | Bosnia | Herzegovina | NATO | Serbia | Kosovo | Croatia | genocide | Rwanda | strategy | United Nations | Europe | Media | Journalism | Non Government Organizations | NGOs | sanctions | political theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.582 Civil War (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. It studies the origins of civil war, discusses variables affecting duration, and examines termination of conflict. This subject is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases, although with concentration on various Balkan civil wars.

Subjects

Political science | social science | civil war | origins | duration | termination | conflict | Balkan | World Bank | Identity | fear | greed | death | intervention | peace | Columbia | Sudan | Iraq | El Salvador | South Africa

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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