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21G.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT) 21G.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video. This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video. This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese grammar | Japanese language | Japanese language | spoken Japanese | spoken Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT) 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT)

Description

We will look at some recent discoveries in Japanese language (and other relevant languages) that relate to long-standing problems in theoretical linguistics. The course is divided into three parts:A-positions and A-chains 8 weeks (approx)A'-positions and A'-chains 2 weeks (approx)Student presentations 3 weeks (approx) We will look at some recent discoveries in Japanese language (and other relevant languages) that relate to long-standing problems in theoretical linguistics. The course is divided into three parts:A-positions and A-chains 8 weeks (approx)A'-positions and A'-chains 2 weeks (approx)Student presentations 3 weeks (approx)

Subjects

Linguistic | Linguistic | Japanese | Japanese | Japanese literature | Japanese literature | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Representations (MIT)

Description

We will explore images that pertain to the emergence of Japan as a modern state. We will focus on images that depict Japan as it comes into contact with the rest of the world after its long and deep isolation during the feudal period. We will also cover city planning of Tokyo that took place after WWII, and such topics as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. A unique feature of this offering is that we will run it concurrently with the edX MOOC and two University of Tokyo MOOCs, Visualizing Postwar Tokyo and Four Faces of Contemporary Japanese Architecture, for much of the remainder of the class.

Subjects

visualizing cultures | visualizing Japan | modern Japanese history | Commodore Matthew C. Perry | Westernization in Japan | modernity in Japan | visualizing postwar Tokyo | Imperial Democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT) 21G.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities. This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities.

Subjects

Japan | Japan | Japanese culture | Japanese culture | otaku | otaku | tale of heike | tale of heike | tale of genji | tale of genji | hiroshima | hiroshima | modern japan | modern japan | history of japan | history of japan | anime | anime

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.501 Beginning Japanese I (MIT) 21G.501 Beginning Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lessons 1 through 6 from Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1 (by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to acquire the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with increasing spontaneity. Students learn Hiragana and Katakana (the Japanese phonetic symbols), then approximately 50 Kanji (Sino-Japanese characters) in this course. This course covers Lessons 1 through 6 from Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1 (by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to acquire the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with increasing spontaneity. Students learn Hiragana and Katakana (the Japanese phonetic symbols), then approximately 50 Kanji (Sino-Japanese characters) in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese grammar | modern Japanese | modern Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.502 Beginning Japanese II (MIT) 21G.502 Beginning Japanese II (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lessons 7-12A of JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), enhancing the basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The class emphasizes the development of communicative skills (i.e., your actual use of Japanese in contexts). By the end of this semester, students are expected to carry on a daily conversation with Japanese people. This course will stress active command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. This course covers Lessons 7-12A of JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), enhancing the basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The class emphasizes the development of communicative skills (i.e., your actual use of Japanese in contexts). By the end of this semester, students are expected to carry on a daily conversation with Japanese people. This course will stress active command of Japanese, not passive knowledge.

Subjects

Japanese language | Japanese language | Japanese grammar | Japanese grammar | kanji | kanji

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese language | spoken Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese language | spoken Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese language | spoken Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT) 21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan. Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | World Trade Center | September 11 | September 11 | memorial | memorial | discourse | discourse | media | media | art | art | collective memory | collective memory | Germany | Germany | Japan | Japan | global commerce | global commerce | transportation | transportation | systems | systems | surveillance | surveillance | non-Western cultures | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Chomsky | Freud | Freud | Edward Said | Edward Said

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT) SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT)

Description

This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw

Subjects

seminar | seminar | samurai | samurai | cooking | cooking | blacksmithing | blacksmithing | Japan | Japan | Peru | Peru | China | China | U.S.A | U.S.A | England | England | longitude | longitude | marine navigation | marine navigation | clocks | clocks | cars | cars | suburbia | suburbia | weaving | weaving | quipus | quipus | encoding | encoding | aesthetics | aesthetics | Zen Buddhism | Zen Buddhism | Inca Empire | Inca Empire | culture | culture | myths | myths | technology | technology | social change | social change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.502 Beginning Japanese II (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lessons 7-12A of JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), enhancing the basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The class emphasizes the development of communicative skills (i.e., your actual use of Japanese in contexts). By the end of this semester, students are expected to carry on a daily conversation with Japanese people. This course will stress active command of Japanese, not passive knowledge.

Subjects

Japanese language | Japanese grammar | kanji

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT) SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT)

Description

This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language. This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language.

Subjects

translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture | translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Reflections on the division between the sacred and the secular in contemporary Japan: The case of life-cycle rituals

Description

ct on the possible answers to the above questions.

Subjects

EJRC | Europe Japan Research Centre | Japanese | Anthropology | Seminars | research

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
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?s Memory of Hollywood Cinema in Post-war Japan

Description

Following their defeat of Japan in the second World War the occupying American forces imposed radical policies of suffrage, demilitarisation and wide ranging social reforms. Part of the allied policies included strict censorship on what could be shown in cinemas. This lead to the wide scale importation of Hollywood cinema into a country where until recently it had not only been banned but audiences had been fed a strict diet of anti-american propaganda. In light of the developing field of audience research and memory studies in Japanese cinema this seminar will look at primary research with surviving women to see how in watching Hollywood cinema and phrasing their own experiences through those of popular films and Hollywood stars, women were able to make sense of their own pasts.

Subjects

EJRC | Europe Japan Research Centre | Japanese | Anthropology | Seminars | research

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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The Creativity of Loss: Aging, ritual, and economies of care in contemporary Japan

Description

This talk examines the ways in which Japanese men and women experience old age today. While the image of Japan as a geriatric utopia where elders are revered and dutifully cared for by their families is still prevalent around the world, the rapid aging of the Japanese population, combined with other political, historical and economic changes has exposed a much more fraught and ambivalent relationship to old age. The development of modern care institutions and fragmenting family ties has left many older adults wondering where they will spend their last years and with whom. What does one hope for in old age? What gives life interest and a sense of wellbeing when old age has brought so many losses? I propose that the ideas of interest, loss, and risk are appropriate here because they are par

Subjects

EJRC | Europe Japan Research Centre | Japanese | Anthropology | Seminars | research

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT) 14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT)

Description

This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008. This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008.

Subjects

economic history | economic history | financial crises | financial crises | industrialization | industrialization | World War I | World War I | depression | depression | recovery | recovery | World War II | World War II | the Golden Age | the Golden Age | income inequality | income inequality | oil crises | oil crises | 1970s | 1970s | Japanese growth and stagnation | Japanese growth and stagnation | small crises | small crises | imbalance | imbalance | 2008 crisis | 2008 crisis | 2009 crisis | 2009 crisis | 1930s | 1930s | 1940s | 1940s

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Modernity of Didactic Literature for women in the Tokugawa Period

Description

manacs?, and ?manuals for the right attitude?, lend a new perspective on gender roles of the time, just as gender studies provides a critical perspective on didactic literature.

Subjects

EJRC | Europe Japan Research Centre | Japanese | Anthropology | Seminars | research

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | solids | structures | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | direct integration | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | mode shapes | statics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | Japan | politics | policy | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | interest group politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | foreign policy | defense policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | trade policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.501 Beginning Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lessons 1 through 6 from Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1 (by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to acquire the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with increasing spontaneity. Students learn Hiragana and Katakana (the Japanese phonetic symbols), then approximately 50 Kanji (Sino-Japanese characters) in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | modern Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.504 East Asia in the World (MIT) 21H.504 East Asia in the World (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners. This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners.

Subjects

History | History | China | China | Japan | Japan | Korea | Korea | Vietnam | Vietnam

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | criminal justice | citizenship | citizenship | nationhood | nationhood | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | religion | religion | mass incarceration | mass incarceration | poverty | poverty | class | class | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | death penalty | death penalty | drug laws | drug laws | police | police | terrorism | terrorism | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | 9/11 | Ferguson | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | George Zimmerman | militarization | militarization | guilt | guilt | innocence | innocence | illegal alien | illegal alien | undocumented | undocumented | immigration | immigration | deportation | deportation | civil liberties | civil liberties | internment | internment | Japanese | Japanese | WWII | WWII | police brutality | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT) 17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e

Subjects

Health care | Health care | policy | policy | United States | United States | medical services | medical services | health care costs | health care costs | markets | markets | regulatory policy | regulatory policy | Canada | Canada | Great Britian | Great Britian | Japan | Japan | Germany | Germany | technology | technology | decentralization | decentralization | health risks | health risks | comparative prospectives | comparative prospectives | access | access | reform | reform | political | political | organizational | organizational | factors | factors

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A guide to Japanese films and manga in the Headington Library

Description

List of Japanese feature films and anime on DVD as well as manga titles available from Oxford Brookes Library

Subjects

Japanese cinema Japanese film Anime Manga

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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