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21G.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT) 21G.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video. This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video. This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese grammar | Japanese language | Japanese language | spoken Japanese | spoken Japanese

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21G.501 Beginning Japanese I (MIT) 21G.501 Beginning Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lessons 1 through 6 from Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1 (by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to acquire the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with increasing spontaneity. Students learn Hiragana and Katakana (the Japanese phonetic symbols), then approximately 50 Kanji (Sino-Japanese characters) in this course. This course covers Lessons 1 through 6 from Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1 (by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to acquire the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with increasing spontaneity. Students learn Hiragana and Katakana (the Japanese phonetic symbols), then approximately 50 Kanji (Sino-Japanese characters) in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese grammar | modern Japanese | modern Japanese

License

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24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT) 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT)

Description

We will look at some recent discoveries in Japanese language (and other relevant languages) that relate to long-standing problems in theoretical linguistics. The course is divided into three parts:A-positions and A-chains 8 weeks (approx)A'-positions and A'-chains 2 weeks (approx)Student presentations 3 weeks (approx) We will look at some recent discoveries in Japanese language (and other relevant languages) that relate to long-standing problems in theoretical linguistics. The course is divided into three parts:A-positions and A-chains 8 weeks (approx)A'-positions and A'-chains 2 weeks (approx)Student presentations 3 weeks (approx)

Subjects

Linguistic | Linguistic | Japanese | Japanese | Japanese literature | Japanese literature | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics

License

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

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21G.502 Beginning Japanese II (MIT) 21G.502 Beginning Japanese II (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lessons 7-12A of JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), enhancing the basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The class emphasizes the development of communicative skills (i.e., your actual use of Japanese in contexts). By the end of this semester, students are expected to carry on a daily conversation with Japanese people. This course will stress active command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. This course covers Lessons 7-12A of JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), enhancing the basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The class emphasizes the development of communicative skills (i.e., your actual use of Japanese in contexts). By the end of this semester, students are expected to carry on a daily conversation with Japanese people. This course will stress active command of Japanese, not passive knowledge.

Subjects

Japanese language | Japanese language | Japanese grammar | Japanese grammar | kanji | kanji

License

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21G.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT) 21G.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities. This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities.

Subjects

Japan | Japan | Japanese culture | Japanese culture | otaku | otaku | tale of heike | tale of heike | tale of genji | tale of genji | hiroshima | hiroshima | modern japan | modern japan | history of japan | history of japan | anime | anime

License

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Representations (MIT)

Description

We will explore images that pertain to the emergence of Japan as a modern state. We will focus on images that depict Japan as it comes into contact with the rest of the world after its long and deep isolation during the feudal period. We will also cover city planning of Tokyo that took place after WWII, and such topics as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. A unique feature of this offering is that we will run it concurrently with the edX MOOC and two University of Tokyo MOOCs, Visualizing Postwar Tokyo and Four Faces of Contemporary Japanese Architecture, for much of the remainder of the class.

Subjects

visualizing cultures | visualizing Japan | modern Japanese history | Commodore Matthew C. Perry | Westernization in Japan | modernity in Japan | visualizing postwar Tokyo | Imperial Democracy

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21F.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese language | spoken Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese language | spoken Japanese

License

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21G.503 Intermediate Japanese I (MIT)

Description

This course covers JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987) Lessons 12 through 17, providing opportunities to acquire basic skills for conversation, reading, and writing. The program emphasizes ACTIVE command of Japanese, not passive knowledge. The goal is not simply to study the grammar and vocabulary, but to improve the ability to use Japanese accurately and appropriately with fluency, building on the basic skills gained in Japanese I and II. Students learn approximately 80 Kanji characters in this course.

Subjects

Japanese grammar | Japanese language | spoken Japanese

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT)

Description

At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern. At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | nobility | nobility | bourgeoisie | bourgeoisie | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Russo-Japanese War | Russo-Japanese War | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics, (2) Electoral Politics, (3) Interest Group Politics, and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part of the semester focuses on public policy, divided into seven major policy areas: (1) Social Policy, (2) Foreign Policy, (3) Defense Policy, (4) Energy Policy, (5) Science and Technology Policy, (6) Industrial Policy, and (7) Trade Policy. We will try to understand the ways in which the ac This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics, (2) Electoral Politics, (3) Interest Group Politics, and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part of the semester focuses on public policy, divided into seven major policy areas: (1) Social Policy, (2) Foreign Policy, (3) Defense Policy, (4) Energy Policy, (5) Science and Technology Policy, (6) Industrial Policy, and (7) Trade Policy. We will try to understand the ways in which the ac

Subjects

Japan | Japan | History | History | Politics | Politics | Society | Society | Party Politics | Party Politics | Elec | Elec | Electoral Politics | Electoral Politics | Interest Group Politics | Interest Group Politics | Bureaucratic Politics | Bureaucratic Politics | Social Policy | Social Policy | Foreign Policy | Foreign Policy | Defense Policy | Defense Policy | Energy Policy | Energy Policy | Science and Technology Policy | Science and Technology Policy | Industrial Policy | Industrial Policy | Trade Policy | Trade Policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both pre-modern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). Each week we will analyze a specific cultural phenomenon, or aspect of material culture, from China, Japan or Korea in order to gain insights into the cultures of these countries. We will also consider the central influence of major philosophical systems such as Confucianism and Buddhism on East Asian cultures. A comparative perspective will be employed to examine the cultural links, and the cultural differences between these three countries of East Asia (as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan). The course will also introduce students to a variety of methodologies for the study of culture (e. g. cultu The course examines various aspects of culture in both pre-modern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). Each week we will analyze a specific cultural phenomenon, or aspect of material culture, from China, Japan or Korea in order to gain insights into the cultures of these countries. We will also consider the central influence of major philosophical systems such as Confucianism and Buddhism on East Asian cultures. A comparative perspective will be employed to examine the cultural links, and the cultural differences between these three countries of East Asia (as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan). The course will also introduce students to a variety of methodologies for the study of culture (e. g. cultu

Subjects

East Asia | East Asia | culture | culture | literature | literature | art | art | performance | performance | food | food | religion | religion | popular culture | popular culture | film | film | pop music | pop music | karaoke | karaoke | manga | manga | China | China | Japan | Japan | Korea | Korea | Taiwan | Taiwan | Hong Kong | Hong Kong | women's culture | women's culture

License

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT) 21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan. Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | World Trade Center | September 11 | September 11 | memorial | memorial | discourse | discourse | media | media | art | art | collective memory | collective memory | Germany | Germany | Japan | Japan | global commerce | global commerce | transportation | transportation | systems | systems | surveillance | surveillance | non-Western cultures | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Chomsky | Freud | Freud | Edward Said | Edward Said

License

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17.541 Japanese Politics and Society (MIT) 17.541 Japanese Politics and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is designed for students seeking a fundamental understanding of Japanese history, politics, culture, and the economy. "Raw Fish 101" (as it is often labeled) combines lectures, seminar discussion, small-team case studies, and Web page construction exercises, all designed to shed light on contemporary Japan. This course is designed for students seeking a fundamental understanding of Japanese history, politics, culture, and the economy. "Raw Fish 101" (as it is often labeled) combines lectures, seminar discussion, small-team case studies, and Web page construction exercises, all designed to shed light on contemporary Japan.

Subjects

Japan | Japan | history | history | economy | economy | technology | technology | education | education | workplace | workplace | community | community | civil society | civil society

License

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17.486 Japan and East Asian Security (MIT) 17.486 Japan and East Asian Security (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for graduate students interested in international politics, national security and comparative political economy in East Asia. It examines the political, military, and economic challenges facing Japan, its neighbors, and the international system under conditions of great uncertainty. Topics range from the history of once "new" world orders to theories that inform our understanding of international affairs and foreign policy decision-making, as each is related to Japan. We focus on Japanese bilateral, regional, and global security policies from a range of theoretical perspectives. The semester will culminate in a weekend-long Asia-Pacific Crisis Simulation game in which invited U.S. and foreign experts will participate with the graduate students. This subject is designed for graduate students interested in international politics, national security and comparative political economy in East Asia. It examines the political, military, and economic challenges facing Japan, its neighbors, and the international system under conditions of great uncertainty. Topics range from the history of once "new" world orders to theories that inform our understanding of international affairs and foreign policy decision-making, as each is related to Japan. We focus on Japanese bilateral, regional, and global security policies from a range of theoretical perspectives. The semester will culminate in a weekend-long Asia-Pacific Crisis Simulation game in which invited U.S. and foreign experts will participate with the graduate students.

Subjects

Japan | Japan | China | China | Korea | Korea | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | United States | United States | policy | policy | security | security | economics | economics | global | global | regional | regional | bilateral | bilateral | international | international | national | national | comparative | comparative | strategic | strategic | military | military | diplomacy | diplomacy

License

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17.584 Civil-Military Relations (MIT) 17.584 Civil-Military Relations (MIT)

Description

This course centers on mechanisms of civilian control of the military. Relying on the influential texts of Lasswell, Huntington, and Finer, the first classes clarify the basic tensions between the military and civilians. A wide-ranging series of case studies follows. These cases are chosen to create a field of variation that includes states with stable civilian rule, states with stable military influence, and states exhibiting fluctuations between military and civilian control. The final three weeks of the course are devoted to the broader relationship between military and society. This course centers on mechanisms of civilian control of the military. Relying on the influential texts of Lasswell, Huntington, and Finer, the first classes clarify the basic tensions between the military and civilians. A wide-ranging series of case studies follows. These cases are chosen to create a field of variation that includes states with stable civilian rule, states with stable military influence, and states exhibiting fluctuations between military and civilian control. The final three weeks of the course are devoted to the broader relationship between military and society.

Subjects

Civil | Civil | Military | Military | relations | relations | mechanisms | mechanisms | civilian control | civilian control | Lasswell | Lasswell | Huntington | Huntington | Finer | Finer | case studies | case studies | states | states | civilian rule | civilian rule | society | society | United States | United States | Soviet Union | Soviet Union | Great Purge | Great Purge | Latin America | Latin America | Turkey | Turkey | Pakistan | Pakistan | Japan | Japan | Africa | Africa | Multiethnic States | Multiethnic States

License

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17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT) 17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e

Subjects

Health care | Health care | policy | policy | United States | United States | medical services | medical services | health care costs | health care costs | markets | markets | regulatory policy | regulatory policy | Canada | Canada | Great Britian | Great Britian | Japan | Japan | Germany | Germany | technology | technology | decentralization | decentralization | health risks | health risks | comparative prospectives | comparative prospectives | access | access | reform | reform | political | political | organizational | organizational | factors | factors

License

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11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT) 11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT)

Description

This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future. This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future.

Subjects

planning | planning | politics | politics | post-conflict reconstruction | post-conflict reconstruction | Marshall Plan | Marshall Plan | reconstruction of Japan | reconstruction of Japan | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Bosnia and Herzegovina | September 11 reconstruction | September 11 reconstruction | Iraq politics and society | Iraq politics and society | post-war planning | post-war planning | building democracy | building democracy | international organizations | international organizations | Iraqi-Arab discourse | Iraqi-Arab discourse | vision | vision | stability | stability | resistance | resistance

License

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14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT) 14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT)

Description

This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008. This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008.

Subjects

economic history | economic history | financial crises | financial crises | industrialization | industrialization | World War I | World War I | depression | depression | recovery | recovery | World War II | World War II | the Golden Age | the Golden Age | income inequality | income inequality | oil crises | oil crises | 1970s | 1970s | Japanese growth and stagnation | Japanese growth and stagnation | small crises | small crises | imbalance | imbalance | 2008 crisis | 2008 crisis | 2009 crisis | 2009 crisis | 1930s | 1930s | 1940s | 1940s

License

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21F.064 Intro to Japanese Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines the major aesthetic, social, and political elements which have shaped modern Japanese culture and society. There are readings on contemporary Japan and historical evolution of the culture are coordinated with study of literary texts, film, and art, along with an analysis of everyday life and leisure activities.

Subjects

Japan | Japanese culture | otaku | tale of heike | tale of genji | hiroshima | modern japan | history of japan | anime

License

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21F.502 Beginning Japanese II (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lessons 7-12A of JSL (Japanese: the Spoken Language, Part 1, by Eleanor H. Jorden with Mari Noda, Yale University Press, 1987), enhancing the basic skills for conversation, reading and writing. The class emphasizes the development of communicative skills (i.e., your actual use of Japanese in contexts). By the end of this semester, students are expected to carry on a daily conversation with Japanese people. This course will stress active command of Japanese, not passive knowledge.

Subjects

Japanese language | Japanese grammar | kanji

License

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21H.504 East Asia in the World (MIT) 21H.504 East Asia in the World (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners. This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners.

Subjects

History | History | China | China | Japan | Japan | Korea | Korea | Vietnam | Vietnam

License

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24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT) 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT)

Description

This course is a detailed examination of the grammar of Japanese and its structure which is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. Data from a broad group of languages is studied for comparison with Japanese. This course assumes familiarity with linguistic theory. This course is a detailed examination of the grammar of Japanese and its structure which is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. Data from a broad group of languages is studied for comparison with Japanese. This course assumes familiarity with linguistic theory.

Subjects

Linguistics | Linguistics | Linguistic Theory | Linguistic Theory | Japanese | Japanese | Language | Language | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics | A-positions | A-positions | A-chains | A-chains | A'-positions | A'-positions | A'-chains | A'-chains | Double-object construction | Double-object construction | Possessor raising | Possessor raising | locational verbs | locational verbs | Binding | Binding | External argument | External argument | causative construction | causative construction | reconstruction | reconstruction | word-order permutation | word-order permutation

License

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24.953 Argument Structure and Syntax (MIT) 24.953 Argument Structure and Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course is a detailed investigation of the major issues and problems in the study of lexical argument structure and how it determines syntactic structure. Its empirical scope  is along three dimensions: typology, lexical class, and theoretical framework. The range of linguistic types include English, Japanese, Navajo, and Warlpiri. Lexical classes include those of Levin's English Verb Classes and others producing emerging work on diverse languages. The theoretical emphasis of this course is on structural relations among elements of argument structure. This course is a detailed investigation of the major issues and problems in the study of lexical argument structure and how it determines syntactic structure. Its empirical scope  is along three dimensions: typology, lexical class, and theoretical framework. The range of linguistic types include English, Japanese, Navajo, and Warlpiri. Lexical classes include those of Levin's English Verb Classes and others producing emerging work on diverse languages. The theoretical emphasis of this course is on structural relations among elements of argument structure.

Subjects

lexical argument structure | lexical argument structure | syntactic structure | syntactic structure | typology | typology | lexical class | lexical class | theoretical framework | theoretical framework | linguistics | linguistics | English | English | Japaneses | Japaneses | Navajo | Navajo | Warlpiri | Warlpiri | Levin's English Verb Classes | Levin's English Verb Classes | diverse languages | diverse languages | theoretical emphasis | theoretical emphasis | argument structure | argument structure

License

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