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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT) 12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site.

Subjects

meteorology | meteorology | climate | climate | oceanography | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | Vorticity | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | Vortex motion | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | atmospheric science | atmospheric science | physical oceanography | physical oceanography | ocean engineering | ocean engineering | oceans | oceans | fluid flow | fluid flow | conservation equations | conservation equations | vortex flows | vortex flows | circulation | circulation | Earth | Earth | rotation | rotation | GFD kinematics | GFD kinematics | waves | waves | Eulerian kinematics | Eulerian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT) 12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist. This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.

Subjects

meteorology | meteorology | climate | climate | oceanography | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | Vorticity | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | Vortex motion

License

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8.09 Classical Mechanics III (MIT) 8.09 Classical Mechanics III (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, systems with constraints, rigid body dynamics, vibrations, central forces, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables, perturbation theory, and continuous systems. It provides an introduction to ideal and viscous fluid mechanics, including turbulence, as well as an introduction to nonlinear dynamics, including chaos. This course covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, systems with constraints, rigid body dynamics, vibrations, central forces, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables, perturbation theory, and continuous systems. It provides an introduction to ideal and viscous fluid mechanics, including turbulence, as well as an introduction to nonlinear dynamics, including chaos.

Subjects

Lagrangian mechanics | Lagrangian mechanics | Hamiltonian mechanics | Hamiltonian mechanics | systems with constraints | systems with constraints | rigid body dynamics | rigid body dynamics | vibrations | vibrations | central forces | central forces | Hamilton-Jacobi theory | Hamilton-Jacobi theory | action-angle variables | action-angle variables | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | continuous systems | continuous systems | ideal fluid mechanics | ideal fluid mechanics | viscous fluid mechanics | viscous fluid mechanics | turbulence | turbulence | nonlinear dynamics | nonlinear dynamics | chaos | chaos

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16.13 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (MIT) 16.13 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (MIT)

Description

The major focus of 16.13 is on boundary layers, and boundary layer theory subject to various flow assumptions, such as compressibility, turbulence, dimensionality, and heat transfer. Parameters influencing aerodynamic flows and transition and influence of boundary layers on outer potential flow are presented, along with associated stall and drag mechanisms. Numerical solution techniques and exercises are included. The major focus of 16.13 is on boundary layers, and boundary layer theory subject to various flow assumptions, such as compressibility, turbulence, dimensionality, and heat transfer. Parameters influencing aerodynamic flows and transition and influence of boundary layers on outer potential flow are presented, along with associated stall and drag mechanisms. Numerical solution techniques and exercises are included.

Subjects

aerodynamics | aerodynamics | viscous fluids | viscous fluids | viscosity | viscosity | fundamental theorem of kinematics | fundamental theorem of kinematics | convection | convection | vorticity | vorticity | strain | strain | Eulerian description | Eulerian description | Lagrangian description | Lagrangian description | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | continuity | continuity | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | stress tensor | stress tensor | newtonian fluid | newtonian fluid | circulation | circulation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | similarity | similarity | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | thin shear later approximation | thin shear later approximation | TSL coordinates | TSL coordinates | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | shear later categories | shear later categories | local scaling | local scaling | Falkner-Skan flows | Falkner-Skan flows | solution techniques | solution techniques | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Newton-Raphson | Newton-Raphson | integral momentum equation | integral momentum equation | Thwaites method | Thwaites method | integral kinetic energy equation | integral kinetic energy equation | dissipation | dissipation | asymptotic perturbation | asymptotic perturbation | displacement body | displacement body | transpiration | transpiration | form drag | form drag | stall | stall | interacting boundary layer theory | interacting boundary layer theory | stability | stability | transition | transition | small-perturbation | small-perturbation | Orr-Somemerfeld | Orr-Somemerfeld | temporal amplification | temporal amplification | spatial amplification | spatial amplification | Reynolds | Reynolds | Prandtl | Prandtl | turbulent boundary layer | turbulent boundary layer | wake | wake | wall layers | wall layers | inner variables | inner variables | outer variables | outer variables | roughness | roughness | Clauser | Clauser | Dissipation formula | Dissipation formula | integral closer | integral closer | turbulence modeling | turbulence modeling | transport models | transport models | turbulent shear layers | turbulent shear layers | compressible then shear layers | compressible then shear layers | compressibility | compressibility | temperature profile | temperature profile | heat flux | heat flux | 3D boundary layers | 3D boundary layers | crossflow | crossflow | lateral dilation | lateral dilation | 3D separation | 3D separation | constant-crossflow | constant-crossflow | 3D transition | 3D transition | compressible thin shear layers | compressible thin shear layers

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16.61 Aerospace Dynamics (MIT) 16.61 Aerospace Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course builds upon the dynamics content of Unified Engineering, a sophomore course taught in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. Vector kinematics are applied to translation and rotation of rigid bodies. Newtonian and Lagrangian methods are used to formulate and solve equations of motion. Additional numerical methods are presented for solving rigid body dynamics problems. Examples and problems describe applications to aircraft flight dynamics and spacecraft attitude dynamics. This undergraduate course builds upon the dynamics content of Unified Engineering, a sophomore course taught in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. Vector kinematics are applied to translation and rotation of rigid bodies. Newtonian and Lagrangian methods are used to formulate and solve equations of motion. Additional numerical methods are presented for solving rigid body dynamics problems. Examples and problems describe applications to aircraft flight dynamics and spacecraft attitude dynamics.

Subjects

aerospace dynamics | aerospace dynamics | Newtonian dynamics | Newtonian dynamics | 3D motion | 3D motion | gyroscopic | gyroscopic | rotational | rotational | dynamics | dynamics | coordinate transformations | coordinate transformations | Lagrangian | Lagrangian | motion | motion | aircraft | aircraft | flight | flight | stability | stability | spacecraft | spacecraft

License

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site.

Subjects

meteorology | climate | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | momentum | energy | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | fluid dynamics | atmospheric science | physical oceanography | ocean engineering | oceans | fluid flow | conservation equations | vortex flows | circulation | Earth | rotation | GFD kinematics | waves | Eulerian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics

License

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs).Prof. Pierre Lermusiaux is very grateful to the teaching assistants Dr. Matt Ueckermann, Dr. Tapovan Lolla, Mr. Jing Lin, and Mr. Arpit Agarwal for the This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs).Prof. Pierre Lermusiaux is very grateful to the teaching assistants Dr. Matt Ueckermann, Dr. Tapovan Lolla, Mr. Jing Lin, and Mr. Arpit Agarwal for the

Subjects

errors | errors | condition numbers and roots of equations | condition numbers and roots of equations | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | finite differences for elliptic | finite differences for elliptic | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | Fourier decomposition | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | error analysis | and stability | and stability | high-order and compact finite-differences | high-order and compact finite-differences | finite volume methods | finite volume methods | time marching methods | time marching methods | Navier-Stokes solvers | Navier-Stokes solvers | grid generation | grid generation | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite element methods | finite element methods | spectral methods | spectral methods | boundary element and panel methods | boundary element and panel methods | turbulent flows | turbulent flows | boundary layers | boundary layers | Lagrangian Coherent Structures | Lagrangian Coherent Structures

License

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6.253 Convex Analysis and Optimization (MIT) 6.253 Convex Analysis and Optimization (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on fundamental subjects in (deterministic) optimization, connected through the themes of convexity, geometric multipliers, and duality. The aim is to develop the core analytical and computational issues of continuous optimization, duality, and saddle point theory using a handful of unifying principles that can be easily visualized and readily understood. The mathematical theory of convex sets and functions will be central, and will allow an intuitive, highly visual, geometrical approach to the subject. This theory will be developed in detail and in parallel with the optimization topics. The first part of the course develops the analytical issues of convexity and duality. The second part is devoted to convex optimization algorithms, and their applications to a variety This course will focus on fundamental subjects in (deterministic) optimization, connected through the themes of convexity, geometric multipliers, and duality. The aim is to develop the core analytical and computational issues of continuous optimization, duality, and saddle point theory using a handful of unifying principles that can be easily visualized and readily understood. The mathematical theory of convex sets and functions will be central, and will allow an intuitive, highly visual, geometrical approach to the subject. This theory will be developed in detail and in parallel with the optimization topics. The first part of the course develops the analytical issues of convexity and duality. The second part is devoted to convex optimization algorithms, and their applications to a variety

Subjects

convexity | convexity | optimization | optimization | geometric duality | geometric duality | Lagrangian duality | Lagrangian duality | Fenchel duality | Fenchel duality | cone programming | cone programming | semidefinite programming | semidefinite programming | subgradients | subgradients | constrained optimization | constrained optimization | gradient projection | gradient projection

License

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12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT) 12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT)

Description

12.620J covers the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. The course uses computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration.The following topics are covered: the Lagrangian formulation, action, variational principles, and equations of motion, Hamilton's principle, conserved quantities, rigid bodies and tops, Hamiltonian formulation and canonical equations, surfaces of section, chaos, canonical transformations and generating functions, Liouville's theorem and Poincaré integral invariants, Poincaré-Birkhoff and KAM theorems, invariant curves and cantori, nonlinear resonances, resonance ov 12.620J covers the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. The course uses computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration.The following topics are covered: the Lagrangian formulation, action, variational principles, and equations of motion, Hamilton's principle, conserved quantities, rigid bodies and tops, Hamiltonian formulation and canonical equations, surfaces of section, chaos, canonical transformations and generating functions, Liouville's theorem and Poincaré integral invariants, Poincaré-Birkhoff and KAM theorems, invariant curves and cantori, nonlinear resonances, resonance ov

Subjects

classical mechanics | classical mechanics | phase space | phase space | computation | computation | Lagrangian formulation | Lagrangian formulation | action | action | variational principles | variational principles | equations of motion | equations of motion | Hamilton's principle | Hamilton's principle | conserved quantities | conserved quantities | rigid bodies and tops | rigid bodies and tops | Hamiltonian formulation | Hamiltonian formulation | canonical equations | canonical equations | surfaces of section | surfaces of section | chaos | chaos | canonical transformations | canonical transformations | generating functions | generating functions | Liouville's theorem | Liouville's theorem | Poincar? integral invariants | Poincar? integral invariants | Poincar?-Birkhoff | Poincar?-Birkhoff | KAM theorem | KAM theorem | invariant curves | invariant curves | cantori | cantori | nonlinear resonances | nonlinear resonances | resonance overlap | resonance overlap | transition to chaos | transition to chaos | chaotic motion | chaotic motion | 12.620 | 12.620 | 6.946 | 6.946 | 8.351 | 8.351

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Dynamics (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Fluid Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs). This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs).

Subjects

errors | errors | condition numbers and roots of equations | condition numbers and roots of equations | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | finite differences for elliptic | finite differences for elliptic | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | Fourier decomposition | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | error analysis | and stability | and stability | high-order and compact finite-differences | high-order and compact finite-differences | finite volume methods | finite volume methods | time marching methods | time marching methods | Navier-Stokes solvers | Navier-Stokes solvers | grid generation | grid generation | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite element methods | finite element methods | spectral methods | spectral methods | boundary element and panel methods | boundary element and panel methods | turbulent flows | turbulent flows | boundary layers | boundary layers | Lagrangian Coherent Structures | Lagrangian Coherent Structures

License

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1.206J Airline Schedule Planning (MIT) 1.206J Airline Schedule Planning (MIT)

Description

Explores a variety of models and optimization techniques for the solution of airline schedule planning and operations problems. Schedule design, fleet assignment, aircraft maintenance routing, crew scheduling, passenger mix, and other topics are covered. Recent models and algorithms addressing issues of model integration, robustness, and operations recovery are introduced. Modeling and solution techniques designed specifically for large-scale problems, and state-of-the-art applications of these techniques to airline problems are detailed. Explores a variety of models and optimization techniques for the solution of airline schedule planning and operations problems. Schedule design, fleet assignment, aircraft maintenance routing, crew scheduling, passenger mix, and other topics are covered. Recent models and algorithms addressing issues of model integration, robustness, and operations recovery are introduced. Modeling and solution techniques designed specifically for large-scale problems, and state-of-the-art applications of these techniques to airline problems are detailed.

Subjects

Airline Schedule Planning | Airline Schedule Planning | Optimization | Optimization | Operations | Operations | Fleet Assignment | Fleet Assignment | Aircraft Maintenance Routing | Aircraft Maintenance Routing | Crew Scheduling | Crew Scheduling | Passenger Mix | Passenger Mix | Model Integration | Model Integration | Robustness | Robustness | Operations Recovery | Operations Recovery | models | models | optimization techniques | optimization techniques | airline schedule planning problems | airline schedule planning problems | schedule design | schedule design | fleet assignment | fleet assignment | aircraft maintenance routing | aircraft maintenance routing | crew scheduling | crew scheduling | robust planning | robust planning | passenger mix | passenger mix | integrated schedule planning | integrated schedule planning | solution techniques | solution techniques | decomposition | decomposition | Lagrangian relaxation | Lagrangian relaxation | column generation | column generation | partitioning | partitioning | applications | applications | algorithms | algorithms | model integration | model integration | robustness | robustness | operations recovery | operations recovery | airline schedule planning | airline schedule planning | 16.77 | 16.77 | ESD.215 | ESD.215

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course will provide students with an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®. Topics covered throughout the course will include: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations; Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis, and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Subject includes a final research project. This course will provide students with an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®. Topics covered throughout the course will include: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations; Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis, and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Subject includes a final research project.

Subjects

errors | errors | condition numbers and roots of equations | condition numbers and roots of equations | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | finite differences for elliptic | finite differences for elliptic | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | and stability | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | and stability | high-order and compact finite-differences | high-order and compact finite-differences | finite volume methods | finite volume methods | time marching methods | time marching methods | Navier-Stokes solvers | Navier-Stokes solvers | grid generation | grid generation | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite element methods | finite element methods | spectral methods | spectral methods | boundary element and panel methods | boundary element and panel methods | turbulent flows | turbulent flows | boundary layers | boundary layers | Lagrangian Coherent Structures | Lagrangian Coherent Structures

License

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6.252J Nonlinear Programming (MIT) 6.252J Nonlinear Programming (MIT)

Description

6.252J is a course in the department's "Communication, Control, and Signal Processing" concentration. This course provides a unified analytical and computational approach to nonlinear optimization problems. The topics covered in this course include: unconstrained optimization methods, constrained optimization methods, convex analysis, Lagrangian relaxation, nondifferentiable optimization, and applications in integer programming. There is also a comprehensive treatment of optimality conditions, Lagrange multiplier theory, and duality theory. Throughout the course, applications are drawn from control, communications, power systems, and resource allocation problems. 6.252J is a course in the department's "Communication, Control, and Signal Processing" concentration. This course provides a unified analytical and computational approach to nonlinear optimization problems. The topics covered in this course include: unconstrained optimization methods, constrained optimization methods, convex analysis, Lagrangian relaxation, nondifferentiable optimization, and applications in integer programming. There is also a comprehensive treatment of optimality conditions, Lagrange multiplier theory, and duality theory. Throughout the course, applications are drawn from control, communications, power systems, and resource allocation problems.

Subjects

nonlinear programming | nonlinear programming | non-linear programming | non-linear programming | nonlinear optimization | nonlinear optimization | unconstrained optimization | unconstrained optimization | gradient | gradient | conjugate direction | conjugate direction | Newton | Newton | quasi-Newton methods | quasi-Newton methods | constrained optimization | constrained optimization | feasible directions | feasible directions | projection | projection | interior point | interior point | Lagrange multiplier | Lagrange multiplier | convex analysis | convex analysis | Lagrangian relaxation | Lagrangian relaxation | nondifferentiable optimization | nondifferentiable optimization | integer programming | integer programming | optimality conditions | optimality conditions | Lagrange multiplier theory | Lagrange multiplier theory | duality theory | duality theory | control | control | communications | communications | power systems | power systems | resource allocation | resource allocation | 6.252 | 6.252 | 15.084 | 15.084

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RES.2-002 Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures (MIT) RES.2-002 Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Finite element analysis is now widely used for solving complex static and dynamic problems encountered in engineering and the sciences. In these two video courses, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses. These videos were produced in 1982 and 1986 by the MIT Center for Advanced Engineering Study. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Finite element analysis is now widely used for solving complex static and dynamic problems encountered in engineering and the sciences. In these two video courses, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses. These videos were produced in 1982 and 1986 by the MIT Center for Advanced Engineering Study.

Subjects

finite element method | finite element method | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | linear analysis | linear analysis | nonlinear analysis | nonlinear analysis | computer modeling | computer modeling | engineering design | engineering design | solids | solids | structures | structures | wave propagation | wave propagation | vibration | vibration | collapse | collapse | buckling | buckling | Lagrangian formulation | Lagrangian formulation | truss | truss | beam | beam | plate | plate | shell | shell | elastic materials | elastic materials | plastic materials | plastic materials | creep | creep | ADINA | ADINA | numerical integration methods | numerical integration methods | mode superposition | mode superposition

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RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics (MIT) RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching the course Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The essays are: 1. Dimensional Analysis of Models and Data Sets: Similarity Solutions and Scaling Analysis,2. A Coriolis Tutorial, and3. Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations of Fluid Flow: Kinematics and the Equations of Motion The goal of this resource is to help each student master the concepts and mathematical tools that make up the foundation of classical and geophysical fluid dynamics. These essays treat these topics in considerably greater depth than a comprehensive fluids textbook can afford, and they are accompanied by data files (MATLAB® and Fortan) that a This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching the course Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The essays are: 1. Dimensional Analysis of Models and Data Sets: Similarity Solutions and Scaling Analysis,2. A Coriolis Tutorial, and3. Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations of Fluid Flow: Kinematics and the Equations of Motion The goal of this resource is to help each student master the concepts and mathematical tools that make up the foundation of classical and geophysical fluid dynamics. These essays treat these topics in considerably greater depth than a comprehensive fluids textbook can afford, and they are accompanied by data files (MATLAB® and Fortan) that a

Subjects

simple pendulum | simple pendulum | inviscid pendulum | inviscid pendulum | viscous pendulum | viscous pendulum | Reynolds number | Reynolds number | decay rate | decay rate | nonlinear projectile problem | nonlinear projectile problem | Coriolis force | Coriolis force | inertial forces | inertial forces | centrifugal force | centrifugal force | energy budget | energy budget | Lagrangian velocity | Lagrangian velocity | Eulerian velocity | Eulerian velocity | Eulerian equations | Eulerian equations

License

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12.620J Classical Mechanics: A Computational Approach (MIT)

Description

12.620J covers the fundamental principles of classical mechanics, with a modern emphasis on the qualitative structure of phase space. The course uses computational ideas to formulate the principles of mechanics precisely. Expression in a computational framework encourages clear thinking and active exploration.The following topics are covered: the Lagrangian formulation, action, variational principles, and equations of motion, Hamilton's principle, conserved quantities, rigid bodies and tops, Hamiltonian formulation and canonical equations, surfaces of section, chaos, canonical transformations and generating functions, Liouville's theorem and Poincaré integral invariants, Poincaré-Birkhoff and KAM theorems, invariant curves and cantori, nonlinear resonances, resonance ov

Subjects

classical mechanics | phase space | computation | Lagrangian formulation | action | variational principles | equations of motion | Hamilton's principle | conserved quantities | rigid bodies and tops | Hamiltonian formulation | canonical equations | surfaces of section | chaos | canonical transformations | generating functions | Liouville's theorem | Poincar? integral invariants | Poincar?-Birkhoff | KAM theorem | invariant curves | cantori | nonlinear resonances | resonance overlap | transition to chaos | chaotic motion | 12.620 | 6.946 | 8.351

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16.61 Aerospace Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course builds upon the dynamics content of Unified Engineering, a sophomore course taught in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. Vector kinematics are applied to translation and rotation of rigid bodies. Newtonian and Lagrangian methods are used to formulate and solve equations of motion. Additional numerical methods are presented for solving rigid body dynamics problems. Examples and problems describe applications to aircraft flight dynamics and spacecraft attitude dynamics.

Subjects

aerospace dynamics | Newtonian dynamics | 3D motion | gyroscopic | rotational | dynamics | coordinate transformations | Lagrangian | motion | aircraft | flight | stability | spacecraft

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8.223 Classical Mechanics II (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is a broad, theoretical treatment of classical mechanics, useful in its own right for treating complex dynamical problems, but essential to understanding the foundations of quantum mechanics and statistical physics.

Subjects

Equations of Motion | Lagrangian Mechanics | ConservedQuantities | Orbits | Scattering Oscillations | Tricky Potentials | Hamiltonian Mechanics | Canonical Equations | Motion of a Rigid Body

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8.09 Classical Mechanics III (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, systems with constraints, rigid body dynamics, vibrations, central forces, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables, perturbation theory, and continuous systems. It provides an introduction to ideal and viscous fluid mechanics, including turbulence, as well as an introduction to nonlinear dynamics, including chaos.

Subjects

Lagrangian mechanics | Hamiltonian mechanics | systems with constraints | rigid body dynamics | vibrations | central forces | Hamilton-Jacobi theory | action-angle variables | perturbation theory | continuous systems | ideal fluid mechanics | viscous fluid mechanics | turbulence | nonlinear dynamics | chaos

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RES.2-002 Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures (MIT)

Description

Finite element analysis is now widely used for solving complex static and dynamic problems encountered in engineering and the sciences. In these two video courses, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses. These videos were produced in 1982 and 1986 by the MIT Center for Advanced Engineering Study.

Subjects

finite element method | statics | dynamics | linear analysis | nonlinear analysis | computer modeling | engineering design | solids | structures | wave propagation | vibration | collapse | buckling | Lagrangian formulation | truss | beam | plate | shell | elastic materials | plastic materials | creep | ADINA | numerical integration methods | mode superposition

License

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course will provide students with an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®. Topics covered throughout the course will include: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations; Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis, and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Subject includes a final research project.

Subjects

errors | condition numbers and roots of equations | Navier-Stokes | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | finite differences for elliptic | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | and stability | high-order and compact finite-differences | finite volume methods | time marching methods | Navier-Stokes solvers | grid generation | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite element methods | spectral methods | boundary element and panel methods | turbulent flows | boundary layers | Lagrangian Coherent Structures

License

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1.206J Airline Schedule Planning (MIT)

Description

Explores a variety of models and optimization techniques for the solution of airline schedule planning and operations problems. Schedule design, fleet assignment, aircraft maintenance routing, crew scheduling, passenger mix, and other topics are covered. Recent models and algorithms addressing issues of model integration, robustness, and operations recovery are introduced. Modeling and solution techniques designed specifically for large-scale problems, and state-of-the-art applications of these techniques to airline problems are detailed.

Subjects

Airline Schedule Planning | Optimization | Operations | Fleet Assignment | Aircraft Maintenance Routing | Crew Scheduling | Passenger Mix | Model Integration | Robustness | Operations Recovery | models | optimization techniques | airline schedule planning problems | schedule design | fleet assignment | aircraft maintenance routing | crew scheduling | robust planning | passenger mix | integrated schedule planning | solution techniques | decomposition | Lagrangian relaxation | column generation | partitioning | applications | algorithms | model integration | robustness | operations recovery | airline schedule planning | 16.77 | ESD.215

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RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching the course Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The essays are: 1. Dimensional Analysis of Models and Data Sets: Similarity Solutions and Scaling Analysis,2. A Coriolis Tutorial, and3. Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations of Fluid Flow: Kinematics and the Equations of Motion The goal of this resource is to help each student master the concepts and mathematical tools that make up the foundation of classical and geophysical fluid dynamics. These essays treat these topics in considerably greater depth than a comprehensive fluids textbook can afford, and they are accompanied by data files (MATLAB® and Fortan) that a

Subjects

simple pendulum | inviscid pendulum | viscous pendulum | Reynolds number | decay rate | nonlinear projectile problem | Coriolis force | inertial forces | centrifugal force | energy budget | Lagrangian velocity | Eulerian velocity | Eulerian equations

License

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs).Prof. Pierre Lermusiaux is very grateful to the teaching assistants Dr. Matt Ueckermann, Dr. Tapovan Lolla, Mr. Jing Lin, and Mr. Arpit Agarwal for the

Subjects

errors | condition numbers and roots of equations | Navier-Stokes | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | finite differences for elliptic | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | and stability | high-order and compact finite-differences | finite volume methods | time marching methods | Navier-Stokes solvers | grid generation | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite element methods | spectral methods | boundary element and panel methods | turbulent flows | boundary layers | Lagrangian Coherent Structures

License

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.

Subjects

meteorology | climate | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | momentum | energy | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Vortex motion

License

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