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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT)

Description

At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern. At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | nobility | nobility | bourgeoisie | bourgeoisie | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Russo-Japanese War | Russo-Japanese War | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two. This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | Pugachev | Pugachev | nobility | nobility | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Chechnya | Chechnya | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Rasputin | Russia | Russia | social heritage | social heritage | cultural heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | autocracy | political reform | political reform | political revolution | political revolution | revolutionary | revolutionary | debates | debates | capitalism | capitalism | historical texts | historical texts | literary texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 19th century | 19th century | major European power | major European power | intellectual class | intellectual class | autocratic order | autocratic order | states | states | societies | societies | West | West | national consciousness | national consciousness | state | state | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT) 21G.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT)

Description

Dieser Kurs beleuchtet schwerpunktartig das neue Selbstbewusstsein von Minoritäten in Deutschland. Zahlreiche aktuelle Beispiele aus Film, Radio, Fernsehen und Literatur belegen den zunehmenden Beitrag dieser Gruppe zum Kultur- und Medienschaffen in Deutschland, sowie deren sich verändernde Repräsentation in den deutschen Medien. Ein zweiter Themenbereich behandelt den neuen Blick nach Osten und die aktuelle Verarbeitung der deutschen Vereinigung unter dem Stichwort Ostalgie. Jüngste Beispiele von populären Medienformen wie Hörspiel und Kurzfilm verdeutlichen die spezifischen Produktions- und Rezeptionsbedingungen in der deutschen Medienlandschaft. In einem Hörspiel-Workshop mit der deutsch-japanischen Schriftstellerin Yoko Taw Dieser Kurs beleuchtet schwerpunktartig das neue Selbstbewusstsein von Minoritäten in Deutschland. Zahlreiche aktuelle Beispiele aus Film, Radio, Fernsehen und Literatur belegen den zunehmenden Beitrag dieser Gruppe zum Kultur- und Medienschaffen in Deutschland, sowie deren sich verändernde Repräsentation in den deutschen Medien. Ein zweiter Themenbereich behandelt den neuen Blick nach Osten und die aktuelle Verarbeitung der deutschen Vereinigung unter dem Stichwort Ostalgie. Jüngste Beispiele von populären Medienformen wie Hörspiel und Kurzfilm verdeutlichen die spezifischen Produktions- und Rezeptionsbedingungen in der deutschen Medienlandschaft. In einem Hörspiel-Workshop mit der deutsch-japanischen Schriftstellerin Yoko Taw

Subjects

German | German | Germany | Germany | minorities | minorities | film | film | radio | radio | television | television | literature | literature | culture | culture | media | media | Ostalgie | Ostalgie | kurzfilm | kurzfilm | radioplay | radioplay | workshop | workshop | Yoko Tawada | Yoko Tawada | production | production | Aprilkinder | Aprilkinder | Fatih Akin | Fatih Akin | Kanak Attack | Kanak Attack | Good Bye Lenin | Good Bye Lenin | Sonnenallee | Sonnenallee | Zimmerspringbrunnen | Zimmerspringbrunnen | Halbe Treppe | Halbe Treppe | Walter Ruttmann | Walter Ruttmann | Paul W?hr; Bill Fontana. | Paul W?hr; Bill Fontana. | Paul W?hr | Paul W?hr | Bill Fontana. | Bill Fontana.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT) 21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers. 21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | insurgents | war | war | freedom fighters | freedom fighters | independence | independence | self-determination | self-determination | emancipation | emancipation | revolution | revolution | Mao | Mao | Lenin | Lenin | Reagan | Reagan | L'Ouverture | L'Ouverture | reactionary | reactionary | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | democracy | democracy | populism | populism | Communism | Communism | equality | equality | nationalism | nationalism | resistance | resistance | ideology | ideology | subversion | subversion | underground | underground | suppression | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | war | freedom fighters | independence | self-determination | emancipation | revolution | Mao | Lenin | Reagan | L'Ouverture | reactionary | imperialism | human rights | democracy | populism | Communism | equality | nationalism | resistance | ideology | subversion | underground | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DP5534 Politics A: Political Theories of the State and the Individual

Description

On completion of this Unit you should be able to: 1. Analyse and evaluate political concepts and theories of the state and the individual. 2. Apply and evaluate concepts and theories of the state and the individual to a system of political representation.

Subjects

DP55 34 | Max Weber | Niccolo Machiavelli | Liberalism | Marxism | Accountability | Liberty | Representation | Athenian Democratic Democracy | Social Contract Theory | Thomas Hobbes | John Locke | Jean-Jacques Rousseau | Vladimir Illich Lenin | SCQF Level 7

License

Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | war | freedom fighters | independence | self-determination | emancipation | revolution | Mao | Lenin | Reagan | L'Ouverture | reactionary | imperialism | human rights | democracy | populism | Communism | equality | nationalism | resistance | ideology | subversion | underground | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT)

Description

At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern.

Subjects

Muscovy | Empire | Peter the Great | Catherine II | nobility | bourgeoisie | Constitution | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Decembrists | serfdom | Alexander II | Great reforms | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Russo-Japanese War | Lenin | World War I | Nicholas II

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Empire | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Pugachev | nobility | Constitution | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Decembrists | serfdom | Alexander II | Great reforms | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Chechnya | Lenin | World War I | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Russia | social heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | political reform | political revolution | revolutionary | debates | capitalism | historical texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | 19th century | major European power | intellectual class | autocratic order | states | societies | West | national consciousness | state | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT)

Description

Dieser Kurs beleuchtet schwerpunktartig das neue Selbstbewusstsein von Minoritäten in Deutschland. Zahlreiche aktuelle Beispiele aus Film, Radio, Fernsehen und Literatur belegen den zunehmenden Beitrag dieser Gruppe zum Kultur- und Medienschaffen in Deutschland, sowie deren sich verändernde Repräsentation in den deutschen Medien. Ein zweiter Themenbereich behandelt den neuen Blick nach Osten und die aktuelle Verarbeitung der deutschen Vereinigung unter dem Stichwort Ostalgie. Jüngste Beispiele von populären Medienformen wie Hörspiel und Kurzfilm verdeutlichen die spezifischen Produktions- und Rezeptionsbedingungen in der deutschen Medienlandschaft. In einem Hörspiel-Workshop mit der deutsch-japanischen Schriftstellerin Yoko Taw

Subjects

German | Germany | minorities | film | radio | television | literature | culture | media | Ostalgie | kurzfilm | radioplay | workshop | Yoko Tawada | production | Aprilkinder | Fatih Akin | Kanak Attack | Good Bye Lenin | Sonnenallee | Zimmerspringbrunnen | Halbe Treppe | Walter Ruttmann | Paul W?hr; Bill Fontana. | Paul W?hr | Bill Fontana.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.245J Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, 1917 to the Present (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and historical evolution of the Soviet state and society from the 1917 Revolution to the present. It covers the creation of a revolutionary regime, causes and nature of the Stalin revolution, post-Stalinist efforts to achieve political and social reform, and causes of the Soviet collapse. It also examines current developments in Russia in light of Soviet history.

Subjects

21H.245 | 17.57 | 21G.086 | Soviet Union | politics | society | Vladimir Putin | Imperial Russia | Russian Revolution | New Economic Policy | Gorbachev | Yeltsin | Lenin | Pobedonostsev | Marxism | October Manifesto | World War I | February Revolution | Romanov dynasty | Bolsheviks | Trotsky | October Revolution | Civil War | Red Army | Communism | Stalin | collectivization | industrialization | Gulag | Molotov-Ribbentrop pact | World War II | Novikov telegram | Khrushchev | Brezhnev | Alena Ledeneva | Putin | Kremlin | Medvedev | Ukraine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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U23128 Russia and East Europe after Lenin: Examination Paper

Description

Examination paper

Subjects

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences\U231 Politics\U23128 Russia and East Europe after Lenin

License

Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved

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21A.104 Memory, Culture, Forgetting (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about the sociocultural practices through which individuals and societies create, sustain, recall, and erase memories. Emphasis is given to the history of knowledge, construction of memory, the role of authorities in shaping memory, and how societies decide on whose versions of memory are more "truthful" and "real." Other topics include how memory works in the human brain, memory and trauma, amnesia, memory practices in the sciences, false memory, sites of memory, and the commodification of memory. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

Subjects

memory | culture | the past | memorials | symbols | rituals | internet | social media | social memory | biology | neuroscience | medicine | ethnography | Masada | slavery | war memorials | Lenin | tragic spirits | forgetting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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