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17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT) 17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power. This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subjects

military intervention | military intervention | post Cold War | post Cold War | internal conflict | internal conflict | Kurds | Kurds | Iraq | Iraq | Somalia | Somalia | Bosnia | Bosnia | Serbia | Serbia | Kosovo | Kosovo | Libya | Libya | Rwanda | Rwanda | Darfur | Darfur | Sudan | Sudan | United States | United States | civil war | civil war | political strategies | political strategies | failing states | failing states | foreign policy | foreign policy | NATO | NATO | genocide | genocide | refugee | refugee | sanctions | sanctions | political reconstruction | political reconstruction | peacekeeping | peacekeeping | humanitarian intervention | humanitarian intervention | the Balkans | the Balkans | Gaddafi | Gaddafi | preventive diplomacy | preventive diplomacy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Contested Constitutions: A Microcosm of post-Arab Spring Divisions Contested Constitutions: A Microcosm of post-Arab Spring Divisions

Description

Five years after Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation in Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia ignited the Arab Spring. Yet while it inspired hope for democratic transition across the Middle East and North Africa, the region continues to be embroiled in civil war, terrorist networks, and crises of political legitimacy. In Syria and Bahrain, dictators used violence to thwart protests, leading to a prolonged civil war in Syria. In Yemen, despite the dictator’s negotiated transfer of power, rival sectarians are vying for power. In Tunisia and Egypt, dictators stepped down without much bloodshed. Lastly, in Libya, rebels overthrew the dictator with foreign military aid, but ... Five years after Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation in Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia ignited the Arab Spring. Yet while it inspired hope for democratic transition across the Middle East and North Africa, the region continues to be embroiled in civil war, terrorist networks, and crises of political legitimacy. In Syria and Bahrain, dictators used violence to thwart protests, leading to a prolonged civil war in Syria. In Yemen, despite the dictator’s negotiated transfer of power, rival sectarians are vying for power. In Tunisia and Egypt, dictators stepped down without much bloodshed. Lastly, in Libya, rebels overthrew the dictator with foreign military aid, but ...

Subjects

Africa | Africa | Comparative Government | Comparative Government | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | Fragile and Post Conflict States | Fragile and Post Conflict States | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Constitution | Constitution | Egypt | Egypt | Libya | Libya | Post-Conflict | Post-Conflict | Tunisia | Tunisia

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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The closest exit may be behind you

Description

The British-Libyan author Hisham Matar describes to a packed audience at Wolfson College the 'existential crisis' at the heart of contemporary Libyan national identity. The talk is introduced by Hermione Lee. The British-Libyan author Hisham Matar marked the first publication of his work in his home country by describing to a packed audience at Wolfson College the 'existential crisis' at the heart of contemporary Libyan national identity, and the corresponding existential exile embedded in the life of the writer. The lecture for the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing (OCLW) at Wolfson was introduced by OCLW Director and College President Hermione Lee, who recounted the thrill of discovering Matar's work while judging the 2006 ManBooker Prize, for which his debut novel In the Country of M Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | Libyan uprising | literature | Libyan uprising

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.478 Great Power Military Intervention (MIT)

Description

This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subjects

military intervention | post Cold War | internal conflict | Kurds | Iraq | Somalia | Bosnia | Serbia | Kosovo | Libya | Rwanda | Darfur | Sudan | United States | civil war | political strategies | failing states | foreign policy | NATO | genocide | refugee | sanctions | political reconstruction | peacekeeping | humanitarian intervention | the Balkans | Gaddafi | preventive diplomacy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Enemy Next Door? ISIL, Libya and Proto-State Actors

Description

One more disaster in North Africa - News about the fall of Sirte to ISIL (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant) has produced little reverberations across the Mediterranean. While there seems to be concerns about it, they are mostly about unrest happening “there” and, thus, fortress Europe can only force more measures to fortify itself and make sure that unrest remains where it is. Needless to say, anti-immigration debates continue to be loud, and are largely informed by a worldview at odds with itself, in which host communities are pitted against a deluge of immigrants - a burden on the economy and a marching in of an inflexible and alien culture. The reasoning is as follows: This is not “our” problem; it is “theirs”. The myopia of ownership and the shortsightedness of this vie

Subjects

International Relations | Libya

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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How the international community failed Libya

Description

The international community has failed Libya. While this may come across as a harsh verdict to the many organizations, governments and individuals, sometimes well-meaning, who since 2011 have been flocking in and out of the country in an attempt to secure its transition to state-hood, it is the case that many of those transactions remained confined to the surface of Libya’s socio-political transition. One still remembers the high hopes of 2011. Libya, with the largest oil reserves in Africa, was well-positioned to launch a new era unlike its neighbors, Egypt and Tunisia, who had mounting economic and structural challenges to address. In Egypt, between 2004 and 2010, there were more than 3,000 labor actions, between protests and strikes, mobilized against a baggage of old anti-democratic

Subjects

International Relations | Libya | UN

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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