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9.123 Neurotechnology in Action (MIT) 9.123 Neurotechnology in Action (MIT)

Description

This course, as a part of MIT's Center for Neurobiological Engineering curriculum, explores cutting-edge neurotechnology that is essential for advances in all aspects of neuroscience, including improvements in existing methods as well as the development, testing and discussion of completely new paradigms. Readings and in-class sessions cover the fields of electrophysiology, light microscopy, cellular engineering, optogenetics, electron microscopy, MRI / fMRI, and MEG / EEG. The course is designed with lectures that cover the background, context, and theoretical descriptions of neurotechnologies, and labs, which provide firsthand demonstrations as well as in situ lab tours. This course, as a part of MIT's Center for Neurobiological Engineering curriculum, explores cutting-edge neurotechnology that is essential for advances in all aspects of neuroscience, including improvements in existing methods as well as the development, testing and discussion of completely new paradigms. Readings and in-class sessions cover the fields of electrophysiology, light microscopy, cellular engineering, optogenetics, electron microscopy, MRI / fMRI, and MEG / EEG. The course is designed with lectures that cover the background, context, and theoretical descriptions of neurotechnologies, and labs, which provide firsthand demonstrations as well as in situ lab tours.

Subjects

Neurotechnology | Neurotechnology | neuron | neuron | electrophysiology | electrophysiology | light microscopy | light microscopy | cellular engineering | cellular engineering | optogenetics | optogenetics | electron microscopy | electron microscopy | MRI/fMRI | MRI/fMRI | functional MRI | functional MRI | MEG/EEG | MEG/EEG

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | brain imaging | brain imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | attention | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | MRI | MRI | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | image signals | image signals | image processing | image processing | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | neurology | neurology | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan | brain imaging | brain imaging | DTI | DTI | vision | vision

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.123 Neurotechnology in Action (MIT)

Description

This course, as a part of MIT's Center for Neurobiological Engineering curriculum, explores cutting-edge neurotechnology that is essential for advances in all aspects of neuroscience, including improvements in existing methods as well as the development, testing and discussion of completely new paradigms. Readings and in-class sessions cover the fields of electrophysiology, light microscopy, cellular engineering, optogenetics, electron microscopy, MRI / fMRI, and MEG / EEG. The course is designed with lectures that cover the background, context, and theoretical descriptions of neurotechnologies, and labs, which provide firsthand demonstrations as well as in situ lab tours.

Subjects

Neurotechnology | neuron | electrophysiology | light microscopy | cellular engineering | optogenetics | electron microscopy | MRI/fMRI | functional MRI | MEG/EEG

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | image signals | image signals | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan

License

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI papers, have a good grasp on what is known about high-level vision from fMRI, and design their own fMRI experiments. This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI papers, have a good grasp on what is known about high-level vision from fMRI, and design their own fMRI experiments.

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT) 22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT)

Description

This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | career | career | career planning | career planning | biotech | biotech | hospital | hospital | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | biologist | biologist | radiation science | radiation science | research | research | scientist | scientist | doctor | doctor | medicine | medicine | MRI | MRI | radiology | radiology | neuroscience | neuroscience

License

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22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT) 22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT)

Description

This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | career | career | career planning | career planning | biotech | biotech | hospital | hospital | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | biologist | biologist | radiation science | radiation science | research | research | scientist | scientist | doctor | doctor | medicine | medicine | MRI | MRI | radiology | radiology | neuroscience | neuroscience

License

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22.56J Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine (MIT) 22.56J Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine (MIT)

Description

22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems. 22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems.

Subjects

theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods | theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods | biology | biology | medicine | medicine | neuroimaging | neuroimaging | X-ray CT | X-ray CT | PET/SPECT | PET/SPECT | MRI | MRI | optical imaging | optical imaging | molecular imaging | molecular imaging | scanning methods | scanning methods | imaging systems | imaging systems | 22.56 | 22.56 | 2.761 | 2.761 | 20.483 | 20.483 | HST.561 | HST.561 | 9.713J | 9.713J | 9.713 | 9.713

License

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22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT) 22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation. An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation.

Subjects

general imaging principles | | general imaging principles | | linear optics | | linear optics | | ray tracing | | ray tracing | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Space Invariance | | Space Invariance | | Pin-hole camera | | Pin-hole camera | | Fourier Transformations | | Fourier Transformations | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Fourier convolution | | Fourier convolution | | Sampling | | Sampling | | Nyquist | | Nyquist | | counting statistics | | counting statistics | | additive noise | | additive noise | | optical imaging | | optical imaging | | Radiation types | | Radiation types | | Radiation detection | | Radiation detection | | photon detection | | photon detection | | spectra | | spectra | | attenuation | | attenuation | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Projective Imaging | | Projective Imaging | | X-ray CT | | X-ray CT | | Ultrasound | | Ultrasound | | microscopy | k-space | | microscopy | k-space | | NMR pulses | | NMR pulses | | f2-D gradient | | f2-D gradient | | spin echoes | | spin echoes | | 3-D methods of MRI | | 3-D methods of MRI | | volume localized spectroscopy | volume localized spectroscopy

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | brain imaging | MRI | CT scan | fMRI | brain | mind | morality | moral reasoning | decision making | intelligence | empathy | trust | religion | love | emotion | gender differences | sexuality | stress | prejudice | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | witness | courtroom testimony | addiction | violence | learning | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul

Subjects

medical imaging | medical lab | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | MRI | fMRI | signal processing | human brain mapping | function | image formation physics | metabolism | psychology | physiology | image signals | image processing | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | neurology | functional data analysis | experimental design | statistical models | human subjects | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | safety | medical | brain scan | brain imaging | DTI | vision

License

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory | voxelwise analysis | voxelwise analysis | conjugate mirroring | conjugate mirroring | interleaved stimulus presentation | interleaved stimulus presentation | magnetization following excitation | magnetization following excitation | active voxels | active voxels | scanner drift | scanner drift | trial sorting | trial sorting | collinear factors | collinear factors | different model factors | different model factors | mock scanner | mock scanner | scanner session | scanner session | visual stimulation task | visual stimulation task | hemoglobin signal | hemoglobin signal | labeling plane | labeling plane | nearby voxels | nearby voxels | shimming coils | shimming coils | bias field estimation | bias field estimation | conscious encoding | conscious encoding | spiral imaging | spiral imaging | functional resolution | functional resolution | hemodynamic activity | hemodynamic activity | direct cortical stimulation | direct cortical stimulation | physiological noise | physiological noise | refractory effects | refractory effects | independent statistical tests. | independent statistical tests.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | imaging | MRI | CT scan | fMRI | brain | mind | impluse | brain imaging | morality | moral reasoning | decision making | intelligence | empathy | trust | religion | love | emotion | gender differences | sexuality | stress | prejudice | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | witness | courtroom testimony | addiction | violence | learning | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.22J A Clinical Approach to the Human Brain (MIT) 9.22J A Clinical Approach to the Human Brain (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to provide an understanding of how the human brain works in health and disease, and is intended for both the Brain and Cognitive Sciences major and the non-Brain and Cognitive Sciences major. Knowledge of how the human brain works is important for all citizens, and the lessons to be learned have enormous implications for public policy makers and educators. The course will cover the regional anatomy of the brain and provide an introduction to the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. Commonly used drugs that alter brain function can be understood through a knowledge of neurotransmitters. Along similar lines, common diseases that illustrate normal brain function will be discussed. Experimental animal studies that reveal how the brain works wil This course is designed to provide an understanding of how the human brain works in health and disease, and is intended for both the Brain and Cognitive Sciences major and the non-Brain and Cognitive Sciences major. Knowledge of how the human brain works is important for all citizens, and the lessons to be learned have enormous implications for public policy makers and educators. The course will cover the regional anatomy of the brain and provide an introduction to the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. Commonly used drugs that alter brain function can be understood through a knowledge of neurotransmitters. Along similar lines, common diseases that illustrate normal brain function will be discussed. Experimental animal studies that reveal how the brain works wil

Subjects

9.22 | 9.22 | HST.422 | HST.422 | brain | brain | fMRI | fMRI | visual | visual | spatial | spatial | dyslexia | dyslexia | development | development | motor activities | motor activities | anatomy | anatomy | cellular function | cellular function | neurons | neurons | synapes | synapes | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | diseases | diseases | animal studies | animal studies | clinical cases | clinical cases | activity-dependent development | activity-dependent development | critical periods | critical periods | plasticity | plasticity | learning | learning | emotional disorders | emotional disorders | vision | vision | language | language | motor function | motor function | pain | pain | placebo effects | placebo effects | emotional states | emotional states | education | education | dementia | dementia

License

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9.458 Parkinson's Disease Workshop (MIT) 9.458 Parkinson's Disease Workshop (MIT)

Description

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the brain that produces movement disorders and deficits in executive functions, working memory, visuospatial functions, and internal control of attention. It is named after James Parkinson (1755-1824), the English neurologist who described the first case. This six-week summer workshop explored different aspects of PD, including clinical characteristics, structural neuroimaging, neuropathology, genetics, and cognitive function (mental status, cognitive control processes, working memory, and long-term declarative memory).  The workshop did not take up the topics of motor control, nondeclarative memory, or treatment.  Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the brain that produces movement disorders and deficits in executive functions, working memory, visuospatial functions, and internal control of attention. It is named after James Parkinson (1755-1824), the English neurologist who described the first case. This six-week summer workshop explored different aspects of PD, including clinical characteristics, structural neuroimaging, neuropathology, genetics, and cognitive function (mental status, cognitive control processes, working memory, and long-term declarative memory).  The workshop did not take up the topics of motor control, nondeclarative memory, or treatment. 

Subjects

Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | chronic progressive degenerative disease | chronic progressive degenerative disease | central nervous system | central nervous system | movement disorders | movement disorders | executive functions | executive functions | working memory | working memory | visuospatial functions | visuospatial functions | internal control of attention | internal control of attention | James Parkinson | James Parkinson | neurologist | neurologist | pathogenic mechanisms | pathogenic mechanisms | positron emission tomography (PET) | positron emission tomography (PET) | structural and functional high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) | structural and functional high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.916 The Neural Basis of Visual Object Recognition in Monkeys and Humans (MIT) 9.916 The Neural Basis of Visual Object Recognition in Monkeys and Humans (MIT)

Description

Understanding the brain's remarkable ability for visual object recognition is one of the greatest challenges of brain research. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of key issues of object representation and to survey data from primate physiology and human fMRI that bear on those issues. Topics include the computational problems of object representation, the nature of object representations in the brain, the tolerance and selectivity of those representations, and the effects of attention and learning. Understanding the brain's remarkable ability for visual object recognition is one of the greatest challenges of brain research. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of key issues of object representation and to survey data from primate physiology and human fMRI that bear on those issues. Topics include the computational problems of object representation, the nature of object representations in the brain, the tolerance and selectivity of those representations, and the effects of attention and learning.

Subjects

vision | vision | object recognition | object recognition | monkey versus human | monkey versus human | object representations | object representations | fMRI | fMRI | temporal lobe | temporal lobe | visual cortex | visual cortex | neuronal representations | neuronal representations | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | retinal image | retinal image | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.93 Cognitive Neuroscience of Remembering: Creating and Controlling Memory (MIT) 9.93 Cognitive Neuroscience of Remembering: Creating and Controlling Memory (MIT)

Description

This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This survey course is intended to review memory and its impact on our lives. Memories make us who we are, and make us what we are going to become. The loss of memory in amnesia can cause us to lose ourselves. Memory provides a bridge between past and present. Through memory, past sensations, feelings, and ideas that have dropped from conscious awareness can be subsequently recovered to guide current thought and action. In this manner, memory allows us to locate our car in the parking lot at the end of the day or guides us to avoid retelling the same joke to the same friend. This seminar will focus on how memories a This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This survey course is intended to review memory and its impact on our lives. Memories make us who we are, and make us what we are going to become. The loss of memory in amnesia can cause us to lose ourselves. Memory provides a bridge between past and present. Through memory, past sensations, feelings, and ideas that have dropped from conscious awareness can be subsequently recovered to guide current thought and action. In this manner, memory allows us to locate our car in the parking lot at the end of the day or guides us to avoid retelling the same joke to the same friend. This seminar will focus on how memories a

Subjects

human memory | human memory | neural memory | neural memory | cognitive control | cognitive control | recall | recall | retrieval | retrieval | learning | learning | perception | perception | priming | priming | forgetting | forgetting | frontal lobe | frontal lobe | MRI | MRI | brain imaging | brain imaging | amnesia | amnesia | Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's | dementia | dementia | aging | aging | short-term memory | short-term memory | long-term memory | long-term memory | memory loss | memory loss | eyewitness | eyewitness | false memory | false memory | visualization | visualization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.51 Affective Priming at Short and Extremely Short Exposures (MIT) 9.51 Affective Priming at Short and Extremely Short Exposures (MIT)

Description

This course is an investigation of affective priming and creation of rigorously counterbalanced, fully computerized testing paradigm. Includes background readings, study design, counterbalancing, study execution, data analysis, presentation of poster, and final paper. This course is an investigation of affective priming and creation of rigorously counterbalanced, fully computerized testing paradigm. Includes background readings, study design, counterbalancing, study execution, data analysis, presentation of poster, and final paper.

Subjects

affective priming | affective priming | learning | learning | memory | memory | retention | retention | testing paradigm | testing paradigm | study design | study design | counterbalancin | counterbalancin | imaging | imaging | fMRI | fMRI | counterbalancing | counterbalancing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.912 Special Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences (MIT) 9.912 Special Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences (MIT)

Description

Memory is not a unitary faculty, but rather consists of multiple forms of learning that differ in their operating characteristics and neurobiological substrates. This seminar will consider current debates regarding the cognitive and neural architectures of memory, specifically focusing on recent efforts to address these controversies through application of functional neuroimaging (primarily fMRI and PET). Memory is not a unitary faculty, but rather consists of multiple forms of learning that differ in their operating characteristics and neurobiological substrates. This seminar will consider current debates regarding the cognitive and neural architectures of memory, specifically focusing on recent efforts to address these controversies through application of functional neuroimaging (primarily fMRI and PET).

Subjects

Memory | Memory | neurobiology | neurobiology | cognitive and neural architectures | cognitive and neural architectures | neuroimaging | neuroimaging | fMRI | fMRI | PET | PET

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | image signals | image signals | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.51 Affective Priming at Short and Extremely Short Exposures (MIT) 9.51 Affective Priming at Short and Extremely Short Exposures (MIT)

Description

This course is an investigation of affective priming and creation of rigorously counterbalanced, fully computerized testing paradigm. Includes background readings, study design, counterbalancing, study execution, data analysis, presentation of poster, and final paper. This course is an investigation of affective priming and creation of rigorously counterbalanced, fully computerized testing paradigm. Includes background readings, study design, counterbalancing, study execution, data analysis, presentation of poster, and final paper.

Subjects

affective priming | affective priming | learning | learning | memory | memory | retention | retention | testing paradigm | testing paradigm | study design | study design | counterbalancin | counterbalancin | imaging | imaging | fMRI | fMRI | counterbalancing | counterbalancing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.081 Human Memory and Learning (MIT) 9.081 Human Memory and Learning (MIT)

Description

Surveys the literature on the cognitive and neural organization of human memory and learning. Includes consideration of working memory and executive control, episodic and semantic memory, and implicit forms of memory. Emphasizes integration of cognitive theory with recent insights from functional neuroimaging (e.g., fMRI and PET). Surveys the literature on the cognitive and neural organization of human memory and learning. Includes consideration of working memory and executive control, episodic and semantic memory, and implicit forms of memory. Emphasizes integration of cognitive theory with recent insights from functional neuroimaging (e.g., fMRI and PET).

Subjects

cognitive | cognitive | neural organization | neural organization | human memory | human memory | learning | learning | working memory | working memory | executive control | executive control | episodic | episodic | semantic memory | semantic memory | functional neuroimaging | functional neuroimaging | fMRI | fMRI | PET | PET

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.582J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (MIT) HST.582J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (MIT)

Description

This course presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing with particular emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It covers principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. The focus of the course is a series of labs that provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. The labs are done in MATLAB® during weekly lab sessions that take place in an electronic classroom. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs. This course presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing with particular emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It covers principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. The focus of the course is a series of labs that provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. The labs are done in MATLAB® during weekly lab sessions that take place in an electronic classroom. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs.

Subjects

HST.582 | HST.582 | 6.555 | 6.555 | 16.456 | 16.456 | signal processing | signal processing | medicine | medicine | biological signal | biological signal | diagnosis | diagnosis | diagnostic tool | diagnostic tool | physiology | physiology | cardiology | cardiology | speech recognition | speech recognition | speech processing | speech processing | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | MRI | MRI | ultrasound | ultrasound | ECG | ECG | electrocardiogram | electrocardiogram | fourier | fourier | FFT | FFT | applications of probabilitym | applications of probabilitym | noise | noise | MATLAB | MATLAB | digital filter | digital filter | DSP | DSP

License

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