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6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT) 6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | microsystem design | material properties | material properties | microfabrication technologies | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | structural behavior | sensing methods | sensing methods | fluid flow | fluid flow | microscale transport | microscale transport | noise | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sensing/control systems | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | inertial sensors | sensitivity | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process | realistic microfabrication process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Education and Exploration (MIT) 11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Education and Exploration (MIT)

Description

This course immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. We explore the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer–based (desktop and handheld) and non–computer–based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings. This course immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. We explore the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer–based (desktop and handheld) and non–computer–based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings.

Subjects

11.127 | 11.127 | CMS.590 | CMS.590 | CMS.836 | CMS.836 | 11.252 | 11.252 | education | education | computers | computers | computer games | computer games | video games | video games | board games | board games | game design | game design | minecraft | minecraft | kerbal space program | kerbal space program | fiasco | fiasco | dominion | dominion | agricola | agricola | pandemic | pandemic | a few acres of snow | a few acres of snow | chrononauts | chrononauts | apples to apples | apples to apples | learning | learning | gamers | gamers | digital games | digital games | multiplayer | multiplayer | prototypes | prototypes

License

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Personal Productivity Applications

Description

Personal Productivity Applications (SCQF Level 5). This unit is designed to enable you to make efficient and effective use of software application packages for personal and business use. The unit will also offer practical experience in using complex features of the three main types of software application packages associated with office and personal use - a word processor, a database and a spreadsheet. Basic system software functions will also be covered to enable you to properly load and terminate application software and to save files in an organised file management structure.

Subjects

software | applications | legislation | MS Word | MS Excel | MS Access | F1K8 11 | F1K811 | C: Information Technology and Information | INFORMATION | SCQF Level 5

License

Licensed to colleges in Scotland Licensed to colleges in Scotland http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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Service Engineering Laboratory Service Engineering Laboratory

Description

The aim of the Service Engineering Laboratory is to explore the concepts of network based services by carrying out practical laboratory work that allows deeper understanding of the requirements and best practices for network services. Students will carry out practical work on protocols and service provision in wireless networks. The aim of the Service Engineering Laboratory is to explore the concepts of network based services by carrying out practical laboratory work that allows deeper understanding of the requirements and best practices for network services. Students will carry out practical work on protocols and service provision in wireless networks.

Subjects

WLAN | WLAN | ía de Telecomunicación | ía de Telecomunicación | MMS | MMS | 2010 | 2010 | Service Engineering | Service Engineering | Laboratory | Laboratory | XHTML | XHTML | ía Telemática | ía Telemática | Android | Android | WAP | WAP

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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16.888 Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization (MIT) 16.888 Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization (MIT)

Description

This course is mainly focused on the quantitative aspects of design and presents a unifying framework called "Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization" (MSDO). The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context, focusing on three aspects of the problem: (i) The multidisciplinary character of engineering systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization. There is a version of this course (16.60s) offered through the MIT Professional Institute, targeted at professional engineers. This course is mainly focused on the quantitative aspects of design and presents a unifying framework called "Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization" (MSDO). The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context, focusing on three aspects of the problem: (i) The multidisciplinary character of engineering systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization. There is a version of this course (16.60s) offered through the MIT Professional Institute, targeted at professional engineers.

Subjects

optimization | optimization | multidisciplinary design optimization | multidisciplinary design optimization | MDO | MDO | subsystem identification | subsystem identification | interface design | interface design | linear constrained optimization fomulation | linear constrained optimization fomulation | non-linear constrained optimization formulation | non-linear constrained optimization formulation | scalar optimization | scalar optimization | vector optimization | vector optimization | systems engineering | systems engineering | complex systems | complex systems | heuristic search methods | heuristic search methods | tabu search | tabu search | simulated annealing | simulated annealing | genertic algorithms | genertic algorithms | sensitivity | sensitivity | tradeoff analysis | tradeoff analysis | goal programming | goal programming | isoperformance | isoperformance | pareto optimality | pareto optimality | flowchart | flowchart | design vector | design vector | simulation model | simulation model | objective vector | objective vector | input | input | discipline | discipline | output | output | coupling | coupling | multiobjective optimization | multiobjective optimization | optimization algorithms | optimization algorithms | tradespace exploration | tradespace exploration | numerical techniques | numerical techniques | direct methods | direct methods | penalty methods | penalty methods | heuristic techniques | heuristic techniques | SA | SA | GA | GA | approximation methods | approximation methods | sensitivity analysis | sensitivity analysis | isoperformace | isoperformace | output evaluation | output evaluation | MSDO framework | MSDO framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT) 5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT)

Description

This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides. This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides.

Subjects

organic structure determination | organic structure determination | relative configuration | relative configuration | elemental analysis | elemental analysis | mass spectometry | mass spectometry | index of hydrogen deficiency | index of hydrogen deficiency | EA | EA | MS | MS | IHD | IHD | infrared spectroscopy | infrared spectroscopy | IR | IR | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | NMR | NMR | chemical equivalence | chemical equivalence | non-equivalence | non-equivalence | topicity | topicity | spin-spin splitting | spin-spin splitting | J coupling | J coupling | chemical shift | chemical shift

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Migration research at Oxford: Dr Evelyn Ersanilli

Description

In this podcast Farhan Samanani interviews MSc Migration Studies lecturer Dr Evelyn Ersanilli to find out more about her research, and the advantages of studying migration and working at the University of Oxford. The discussion includes Evelyn's research interests, some interesting aspects of her work and research, and some insights about working at Oxford. Evelyn Ersanilli is a Departmental Lecturer in Migration Studies at the Department of International Development (QEH). She holds an MSc in Interdisciplinary Social Science (Utrecht University, the Netherlands) and a PhD in Sociology (VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands). Previously she worked as a post-doc at the Social Science Research Centre (WZB) in Berlin and the International Migration Institute in Oxford. Evelyn's research Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

MSc Migration Studies | economics | migration | migration studies | immigration | MSc Migration Studies | economics | migration | migration studies | immigration

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT) 21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation.

Subjects

systems of representation | systems of representation | storytelling | storytelling | myth | myth | cultural practice | cultural practice | anthropology | anthropology | literature | literature | cinematogaphy | cinematogaphy | prime-time | prime-time | commercial broadcasting | commercial broadcasting | media theory | media theory | cultural interpretation | cultural interpretation | CMS.915 | CMS.915

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT) 2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT)

Description

Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials

Subjects

scale | scale | complexity | complexity | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | kinematics | kinematics | metrology | metrology | engineering modeling | motion | engineering modeling | motion | modeling | modeling | design | design | manufacture | manufacture | design principles | design principles | fabrication process | fabrication process | functional requirements | functional requirements | precision instruments | precision instruments | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constaint-based design | constaint-based design | carbon nanotube | carbon nanotube | nanowire | nanowire | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | flexure | flexure | protein structure | protein structure | polymer structure | polymer structure | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | TMA pixel array | TMA pixel array | error modeling | error modeling | repeatability | repeatability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT) 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more. As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | thermoforming | investment casting | investment casting | powder processing | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | project management | communications and computer skills | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT) 3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

This course covers the mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from the materials science and engineering core courses (3.012 and 3.014) to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, and fourier analysis. Users may find additional or updated materials at Professor C This course covers the mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from the materials science and engineering core courses (3.012 and 3.014) to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, and fourier analysis. Users may find additional or updated materials at Professor C

Subjects

energetics | energetics | visualization | visualization | graph | graph | plot | plot | chart | chart | materials science | materials science | DMSE | DMSE | structure | structure | symmetry | symmetry | mechanics | mechanics | physicss | physicss | solids and soft materials | solids and soft materials | linear algebra | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | orthonormal basis | eigenvalue | eigenvalue | eigenvector | eigenvector | quadratic form | quadratic form | tensor operation | tensor operation | symmetry operation | symmetry operation | calculus | calculus | complex analysis | complex analysis | differential equations | differential equations | ODE | ODE | solution | solution | vector | vector | matrix | matrix | determinant | determinant | theory of distributions | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | fourier analysis | random walk | random walk | Mathematica | Mathematica | simulation | simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT) 5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT)

Description

This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides. This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides.

Subjects

organic structure determination | organic structure determination | relative configuration | relative configuration | elemental analysis | elemental analysis | mass spectometry | mass spectometry | index of hydrogen deficiency | index of hydrogen deficiency | EA | EA | MS | MS | IHD | IHD | infrared spectroscopy | infrared spectroscopy | IR | IR | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | NMR | NMR | chemical equivalence | chemical equivalence | non-equivalence | non-equivalence | topicity | topicity | spin-spin splitting | spin-spin splitting | J coupling | J coupling | chemical shift | chemical shift

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 Harnessing the Biosphere: Natural Products and Biotechnology (MIT) 7.341 Harnessing the Biosphere: Natural Products and Biotechnology (MIT)

Description

What do the organisms of the biosphere, specifically microorganisms, have to offer to biotechnological endeavors? In this course we will focus on the production of biomolecules using microbial systems. We will discuss potential growth substrates (such as agricultural waste and carbon dioxide) that can be used and learn about both established and cutting-edge manipulation techniques in the field of synthetic biology. We will also cover the production of biofuels, bioplastics, amino acids (e.g. lysine), food additives (e.g. monosodium glutamate, MSG), specialty chemicals (e.g. succinate), and biopharmaceuticals (e.g. plasmids for gene therapy). This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an What do the organisms of the biosphere, specifically microorganisms, have to offer to biotechnological endeavors? In this course we will focus on the production of biomolecules using microbial systems. We will discuss potential growth substrates (such as agricultural waste and carbon dioxide) that can be used and learn about both established and cutting-edge manipulation techniques in the field of synthetic biology. We will also cover the production of biofuels, bioplastics, amino acids (e.g. lysine), food additives (e.g. monosodium glutamate, MSG), specialty chemicals (e.g. succinate), and biopharmaceuticals (e.g. plasmids for gene therapy). This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an

Subjects

microorganisms | microorganisms | biomolecules | biomolecules | microbial systems | microbial systems | synthetic biology | synthetic biology | biofuels | biofuels | bioplastics | bioplastics | amino acids | amino acids | lysine | lysine | food additives | food additives | monosodium glutamate (MSG) | monosodium glutamate (MSG) | specialty chemicals | specialty chemicals | succinate | succinate | biopharmaceuticals | biopharmaceuticals | enzymes | enzymes | antibiotics and biocompatible materials | antibiotics and biocompatible materials | microbial biotechnology | microbial biotechnology | genetic engineering | genetic engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Geological, Geophysical, Geochemical, Environmental Studies of Some Impact Craters of the Earth (MIT) Geological, Geophysical, Geochemical, Environmental Studies of Some Impact Craters of the Earth (MIT)

Description

There are now about 170 identified impact craters on the Earth, and this number is growing, ever since the well known discovery of Meteor Crater in 1920s. Currently, multi-interdisciplinary research studies of impact structures are getting conducted in fields like mineralogy, petrology, environmental geology, and marine biology. The course objectives are to introduce basic principles of impact cratering, understand the application of analytical tools, and become familiar with geological, geochemical and environmental studies. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. There are now about 170 identified impact craters on the Earth, and this number is growing, ever since the well known discovery of Meteor Crater in 1920s. Currently, multi-interdisciplinary research studies of impact structures are getting conducted in fields like mineralogy, petrology, environmental geology, and marine biology. The course objectives are to introduce basic principles of impact cratering, understand the application of analytical tools, and become familiar with geological, geochemical and environmental studies. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

terrestrial impact cratering | terrestrial impact cratering | terrestrial impact structures | terrestrial impact structures | Argon dating | Argon dating | ICPMS | ICPMS | X-ray diffraction | X-ray diffraction | INAA | INAA | environmental geochemistry | environmental geochemistry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.330J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT) 20.330J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics. This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics.

Subjects

hydrodynamic flow | hydrodynamic flow | electroosmosis | electroosmosis | diffusion | diffusion | electrophoresis | electrophoresis | reaction | reaction | membrane | membrane | cell | cell | biomolecule | biomolecule | microfluidics | microfluidics | ion transport | ion transport | electrokinetics | electrokinetics | Debye layer | Debye layer | Zeta potential | Zeta potential | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | viscous flow | viscous flow | tissue | tissue | organ | organ | biology | biology | molecular biology | molecular biology | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | electro-quasistatics | electro-quasistatics | Van der Waals | Van der Waals | bioMEMS | bioMEMS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.360J The Anthropology of Sound (MIT) 21A.360J The Anthropology of Sound (MIT)

Description

This class examines the ways humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. In addition to learning about how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally, students learn about the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, and sound recording, as well as about the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing are also addressed. A major concern will be with how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples — sound art, environmental recordings, music — will be provided and invi This class examines the ways humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. In addition to learning about how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally, students learn about the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, and sound recording, as well as about the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing are also addressed. A major concern will be with how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples — sound art, environmental recordings, music — will be provided and invi

Subjects

21A.360 | 21A.360 | STS.065 | STS.065 | CMS.710 | CMS.710 | sound art | sound art | Jacques Attali | Jacques Attali | music | music | musicology | musicology | post-modern | post-modern | recording | recording | ethnomusicology | ethnomusicology | ethnography | ethnography | soundscape | soundscape | voice | voice | audio | audio | sonic space | sonic space | science sound | science sound | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT) 21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT)

Description

How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film. How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film.

Subjects

documentary | documentary | ethnography | ethnography | documenting culture documentary tradition | documenting culture documentary tradition | anthropological films | anthropological films | ethics | ethics | film | film | anthropology | anthropology | 21A.337 | 21A.337 | CMS.917 | CMS.917

License

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HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT) HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT)

Description

This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building. This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building.

Subjects

HST.410 | HST.410 | 6.07 | 6.07 | cell manipulation | cell manipulation | microchips | microchips | lithography | lithography | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | optical imaging of cells | optical imaging of cells | cell sorting | cell sorting | microfluidics | microfluidics | osmosis | osmosis | diffusion | diffusion | microfabrication | microfabrication | models of diffusion | models of diffusion | laminar flow | laminar flow | MATLAB data analysis | MATLAB data analysis | cell traps | cell traps | experimental design | experimental design | cytometry techniques | cytometry techniques | computer simulation of neural behavior | computer simulation of neural behavior | casting PDMS | casting PDMS | coulter counter | coulter counter | plasma bonding | plasma bonding

License

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MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT) MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT)

Description

Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | international development | international development | micro-finance | micro-finance | social entrepreneurship | social entrepreneurship | social venture | social venture | communications technology | communications technology | cell phone | cell phone | cellular technology | cellular technology | SMS | SMS | mobile phone | mobile phone | mobile technology | mobile technology | innovation | innovation | health care | health care | economic empowerment | economic empowerment | education | education | civic engagement | civic engagement | bottom of the pyramid | bottom of the pyramid | poverty | poverty | ICT | ICT | ICT4D | ICT4D | can you make a cellphone change the world? | can you make a cellphone change the world?

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT) 21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT)

Description

How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film. How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film.

Subjects

documentary | documentary | ethnography | ethnography | documenting culture documentary tradition | documenting culture documentary tradition | anthropological films | anthropological films | ethics | ethics | film | film | anthropology | anthropology | 21A.337 | 21A.337 | CMS.917 | CMS.917

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT) 21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT)

Description

The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation.

Subjects

systems of representation | systems of representation | storytelling | storytelling | myth | myth | cultural practice | cultural practice | anthropology | anthropology | literature | literature | cinematogaphy | cinematogaphy | prime-time | prime-time | commercial broadcasting | commercial broadcasting | media theory | media theory | cultural interpretation | cultural interpretation | CMS.915 | CMS.915

License

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Language and History

Description

Prof. Simon Horobin examines how the English language has changed over time, addressing such vexed questions as whether Jane Austen could spell, the fate of the apostrophe and whether people who 'literally' explode with anger are corrupting the language. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

masters | #greatwriters | language | MSt | english | oxford | masters | #greatwriters | language | MSt | english | oxford | 2012-10-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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History of English Pronunciation

Description

Do we really know what Chaucer's poetry sounded like? Professor Simon Horobin introduces evidence that gives us an insight into the history of English pronunciation and explores what it tells us about how and why changes in language take place. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poem | masters | literature | language | tales | MSt | #greatwriters | chaucer | canterbury | english | oxford | poem | masters | literature | language | tales | MSt | #greatwriters | chaucer | canterbury | english | oxford

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Shakespeare and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

Description

Professor Charlotte Brewer introduces the methodology behind the creation of the OED and how current activity to update the Dictionary may reveal new evidence about Shakespeare's impact on the English Language. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

masters | #greatwriters | dictionary | language | MSt | shakespeare | english | oxford | oed | masters | #greatwriters | dictionary | language | MSt | shakespeare | english | oxford | oed

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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English and Gender

Description

Professor Deborah Cameron explores some of the key theories surrounding the use of language by women and men. Are we really so different? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

masters | #greatwriters | language | MSt | english | oxford | masters | #greatwriters | language | MSt | english | oxford

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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