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6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT) 6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | microsystem design | material properties | material properties | microfabrication technologies | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | structural behavior | sensing methods | sensing methods | fluid flow | fluid flow | microscale transport | microscale transport | noise | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sensing/control systems | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | inertial sensors | sensitivity | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process | realistic microfabrication process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Education and Exploration (MIT) 11.127J Computer Games and Simulations for Education and Exploration (MIT)

Description

This course immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. We explore the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer–based (desktop and handheld) and non–computer–based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings. This course immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. We explore the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer–based (desktop and handheld) and non–computer–based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings.

Subjects

11.127 | 11.127 | CMS.590 | CMS.590 | CMS.836 | CMS.836 | 11.252 | 11.252 | education | education | computers | computers | computer games | computer games | video games | video games | board games | board games | game design | game design | minecraft | minecraft | kerbal space program | kerbal space program | fiasco | fiasco | dominion | dominion | agricola | agricola | pandemic | pandemic | a few acres of snow | a few acres of snow | chrononauts | chrononauts | apples to apples | apples to apples | learning | learning | gamers | gamers | digital games | digital games | multiplayer | multiplayer | prototypes | prototypes

License

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Personal Productivity Applications

Description

Personal Productivity Applications (SCQF Level 5). This unit is designed to enable you to make efficient and effective use of software application packages for personal and business use. The unit will also offer practical experience in using complex features of the three main types of software application packages associated with office and personal use - a word processor, a database and a spreadsheet. Basic system software functions will also be covered to enable you to properly load and terminate application software and to save files in an organised file management structure.

Subjects

software | applications | legislation | MS Word | MS Excel | MS Access | F1K8 11 | F1K811 | C: Information Technology and Information | INFORMATION | SCQF Level 5

License

Licensed to colleges in Scotland Licensed to colleges in Scotland http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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16.888 Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization (MIT) 16.888 Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization (MIT)

Description

This course is mainly focused on the quantitative aspects of design and presents a unifying framework called "Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization" (MSDO). The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context, focusing on three aspects of the problem: (i) The multidisciplinary character of engineering systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization. There is a version of this course (16.60s) offered through the MIT Professional Institute, targeted at professional engineers. This course is mainly focused on the quantitative aspects of design and presents a unifying framework called "Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization" (MSDO). The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context, focusing on three aspects of the problem: (i) The multidisciplinary character of engineering systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization. There is a version of this course (16.60s) offered through the MIT Professional Institute, targeted at professional engineers.

Subjects

optimization | optimization | multidisciplinary design optimization | multidisciplinary design optimization | MDO | MDO | subsystem identification | subsystem identification | interface design | interface design | linear constrained optimization fomulation | linear constrained optimization fomulation | non-linear constrained optimization formulation | non-linear constrained optimization formulation | scalar optimization | scalar optimization | vector optimization | vector optimization | systems engineering | systems engineering | complex systems | complex systems | heuristic search methods | heuristic search methods | tabu search | tabu search | simulated annealing | simulated annealing | genertic algorithms | genertic algorithms | sensitivity | sensitivity | tradeoff analysis | tradeoff analysis | goal programming | goal programming | isoperformance | isoperformance | pareto optimality | pareto optimality | flowchart | flowchart | design vector | design vector | simulation model | simulation model | objective vector | objective vector | input | input | discipline | discipline | output | output | coupling | coupling | multiobjective optimization | multiobjective optimization | optimization algorithms | optimization algorithms | tradespace exploration | tradespace exploration | numerical techniques | numerical techniques | direct methods | direct methods | penalty methods | penalty methods | heuristic techniques | heuristic techniques | SA | SA | GA | GA | approximation methods | approximation methods | sensitivity analysis | sensitivity analysis | isoperformace | isoperformace | output evaluation | output evaluation | MSDO framework | MSDO framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT) 2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT)

Description

Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials

Subjects

scale | scale | complexity | complexity | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | kinematics | kinematics | metrology | metrology | engineering modeling | motion | engineering modeling | motion | modeling | modeling | design | design | manufacture | manufacture | design principles | design principles | fabrication process | fabrication process | functional requirements | functional requirements | precision instruments | precision instruments | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constaint-based design | constaint-based design | carbon nanotube | carbon nanotube | nanowire | nanowire | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | flexure | flexure | protein structure | protein structure | polymer structure | polymer structure | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | TMA pixel array | TMA pixel array | error modeling | error modeling | repeatability | repeatability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT) 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more. As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | thermoforming | investment casting | investment casting | powder processing | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | project management | communications and computer skills | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.611J Creating Video Games (MIT) CMS.611J Creating Video Games (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions, AV lectures. CMS.611J / 6.073 Creating Video Games is a class that introduces students to the complexities of working in small, multidisciplinary teams to develop video games. Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis. Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions, AV lectures. CMS.611J / 6.073 Creating Video Games is a class that introduces students to the complexities of working in small, multidisciplinary teams to develop video games. Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis.

Subjects

CMS.611 | CMS.611 | game | game | videogame | videogame | software | software | prototyping | prototyping | play | play | test | test | scrum | scrum | agile | agile | code | code | project management | project management | game design | game design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT) 5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT)

Description

This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides. This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides.

Subjects

organic structure determination | organic structure determination | relative configuration | relative configuration | elemental analysis | elemental analysis | mass spectometry | mass spectometry | index of hydrogen deficiency | index of hydrogen deficiency | EA | EA | MS | MS | IHD | IHD | infrared spectroscopy | infrared spectroscopy | IR | IR | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | NMR | NMR | chemical equivalence | chemical equivalence | non-equivalence | non-equivalence | topicity | topicity | spin-spin splitting | spin-spin splitting | J coupling | J coupling | chemical shift | chemical shift

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT) 3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

This course covers the mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from the materials science and engineering core courses (3.012 and 3.014) to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, and fourier analysis. Users may find additional or updated materials at Professor C This course covers the mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from the materials science and engineering core courses (3.012 and 3.014) to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, and fourier analysis. Users may find additional or updated materials at Professor C

Subjects

energetics | energetics | visualization | visualization | graph | graph | plot | plot | chart | chart | materials science | materials science | DMSE | DMSE | structure | structure | symmetry | symmetry | mechanics | mechanics | physicss | physicss | solids and soft materials | solids and soft materials | linear algebra | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | orthonormal basis | eigenvalue | eigenvalue | eigenvector | eigenvector | quadratic form | quadratic form | tensor operation | tensor operation | symmetry operation | symmetry operation | calculus | calculus | complex analysis | complex analysis | differential equations | differential equations | ODE | ODE | solution | solution | vector | vector | matrix | matrix | determinant | determinant | theory of distributions | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | fourier analysis | random walk | random walk | Mathematica | Mathematica | simulation | simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT) 5.46 Organic Structure Determination (MIT)

Description

This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides. This course covers modern and advanced methods of elucidation of the structures of organic molecules, including NMR, MS, and IR (among others). The fundamental physical and chemical principles of each method will be discussed. The major emphasis of this course is on structure determination by way of interpreting the data (generally in the form of a spectrum or spectra) that each method provides.

Subjects

organic structure determination | organic structure determination | relative configuration | relative configuration | elemental analysis | elemental analysis | mass spectometry | mass spectometry | index of hydrogen deficiency | index of hydrogen deficiency | EA | EA | MS | MS | IHD | IHD | infrared spectroscopy | infrared spectroscopy | IR | IR | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | NMR | NMR | chemical equivalence | chemical equivalence | non-equivalence | non-equivalence | topicity | topicity | spin-spin splitting | spin-spin splitting | J coupling | J coupling | chemical shift | chemical shift

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Migration research at Oxford: Dr Evelyn Ersanilli

Description

In this podcast Farhan Samanani interviews MSc Migration Studies lecturer Dr Evelyn Ersanilli to find out more about her research, and the advantages of studying migration and working at the University of Oxford. The discussion includes Evelyn's research interests, some interesting aspects of her work and research, and some insights about working at Oxford. Evelyn Ersanilli is a Departmental Lecturer in Migration Studies at the Department of International Development (QEH). She holds an MSc in Interdisciplinary Social Science (Utrecht University, the Netherlands) and a PhD in Sociology (VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands). Previously she worked as a post-doc at the Social Science Research Centre (WZB) in Berlin and the International Migration Institute in Oxford. Evelyn's research Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

MSc Migration Studies | economics | migration | migration studies | immigration | MSc Migration Studies | economics | migration | migration studies | immigration

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes

Description

This free course, Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, is the first in the series of five courses that introduce the idea of modelling with mathematics. The course centres on a mathematical model of how pollution levels in the Great Lakes of North America vary over a period of time. It demonstrates that, by keeping the model as simple as possible, extremely complex systems can be understood and predicted. First published on Wed, 20 Apr 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 This free course, Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, is the first in the series of five courses that introduce the idea of modelling with mathematics. The course centres on a mathematical model of how pollution levels in the Great Lakes of North America vary over a period of time. It demonstrates that, by keeping the model as simple as possible, extremely complex systems can be understood and predicted. First published on Wed, 20 Apr 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | MSXR209_1 | MSXR209_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT) 21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT)

Description

How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film. How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film.

Subjects

documentary | documentary | ethnography | ethnography | documenting culture documentary tradition | documenting culture documentary tradition | anthropological films | anthropological films | ethics | ethics | film | film | anthropology | anthropology | 21A.337 | 21A.337 | CMS.917 | CMS.917

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Independent. Neutral. Impartial. Political? MSF and the EU Refugee Crisis Independent. Neutral. Impartial. Political? MSF and the EU Refugee Crisis

Description

On 17 June 2016, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) International tweeted: ‘We cannot accept funding from the EU or the Member States while at the same time treating the victims of their polices! It’s that simple.’ The decision is a vivid example of MSF’s political engagement, this time in reaction to EU policies aiming to deter immigration. However, MSF’s actions sit uneasily with the organisation’s politically neutral and impartial public image. The political aspects of its work are not well-captured by the principles of independence, neutrality and impartiality that MSF celebrates, an issue that may hinder members of the public from ... On 17 June 2016, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) International tweeted: ‘We cannot accept funding from the EU or the Member States while at the same time treating the victims of their polices! It’s that simple.’ The decision is a vivid example of MSF’s political engagement, this time in reaction to EU policies aiming to deter immigration. However, MSF’s actions sit uneasily with the organisation’s politically neutral and impartial public image. The political aspects of its work are not well-captured by the principles of independence, neutrality and impartiality that MSF celebrates, an issue that may hinder members of the public from ...

Subjects

The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | EU | EU | MSF | MSF | Refugee crisis | Refugee crisis

License

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21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT) 21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT)

Description

The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation.

Subjects

systems of representation | systems of representation | storytelling | storytelling | myth | myth | cultural practice | cultural practice | anthropology | anthropology | literature | literature | cinematogaphy | cinematogaphy | prime-time | prime-time | commercial broadcasting | commercial broadcasting | media theory | media theory | cultural interpretation | cultural interpretation | CMS.915 | CMS.915

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.330J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT) 20.330J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics. This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics.

Subjects

hydrodynamic flow | hydrodynamic flow | electroosmosis | electroosmosis | diffusion | diffusion | electrophoresis | electrophoresis | reaction | reaction | membrane | membrane | cell | cell | biomolecule | biomolecule | microfluidics | microfluidics | ion transport | ion transport | electrokinetics | electrokinetics | Debye layer | Debye layer | Zeta potential | Zeta potential | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | viscous flow | viscous flow | tissue | tissue | organ | organ | biology | biology | molecular biology | molecular biology | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | electro-quasistatics | electro-quasistatics | Van der Waals | Van der Waals | bioMEMS | bioMEMS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review

Description

Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review is the fifth and final course in the series on mathematical modelling. In this free course we revisit the model developed in the first course of this series on pollution in the Great Lakes of North America. Here we evaluate and revise the original model by comparing its predictions against data from the lakes before finally reflecting on the techniques used. This course assumes you have studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, Analysing skid marks, Developing modelling skills and Modelling heat transfer. First published on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review is the fifth and final course in the series on mathematical modelling. In this free course we revisit the model developed in the first course of this series on pollution in the Great Lakes of North America. Here we evaluate and revise the original model by comparing its predictions against data from the lakes before finally reflecting on the techniques used. This course assumes you have studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, Analysing skid marks, Developing modelling skills and Modelling heat transfer. First published on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | MSXR209_5 | MSXR209_5

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT) 21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation.

Subjects

systems of representation | systems of representation | storytelling | storytelling | myth | myth | cultural practice | cultural practice | anthropology | anthropology | literature | literature | cinematogaphy | cinematogaphy | prime-time | prime-time | commercial broadcasting | commercial broadcasting | media theory | media theory | cultural interpretation | cultural interpretation | CMS.915 | CMS.915

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | material properties | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | sensing methods | fluid flow | microscale transport | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | actuators | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Modelling heat transfer Modelling heat transfer

Description

This free course, Modelling heat transfer, is the fourth in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. In this course you will be taken through the whole modelling process in detail, from creating a first simple model, through evaluating it, to the subsequent revision of the model by changing one of the assumptions. The problem that will be examined is one based on heat transfer. The course assumes you have studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, Analysing skid marks and Developing modelling skills. First published on Mon, 28 Mar 2011 as Modelling heat transfer. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 This free course, Modelling heat transfer, is the fourth in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. In this course you will be taken through the whole modelling process in detail, from creating a first simple model, through evaluating it, to the subsequent revision of the model by changing one of the assumptions. The problem that will be examined is one based on heat transfer. The course assumes you have studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, Analysing skid marks and Developing modelling skills. First published on Mon, 28 Mar 2011 as Modelling heat transfer. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Mathematics Education | Mathematics Education | MSXR209_4 | MSXR209_4

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Developing modelling skills Developing modelling skills

Description

This free course, Developing modelling skills, is the third in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. It provides an overview of the processes involved in developing models, starting by explaining how to specify the purpose of the model. It then moves on to look at aspects involved in creating models, such as simplifying problems, choosing variables and parameters, formulating relationships and finding solutions. You will also look at interpreting results and evaluating models. This course assumes that you have previously studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes and Analysing skid marks. First published on Mon, 13 Jun 2011 as Developing modelling skills. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 This free course, Developing modelling skills, is the third in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. It provides an overview of the processes involved in developing models, starting by explaining how to specify the purpose of the model. It then moves on to look at aspects involved in creating models, such as simplifying problems, choosing variables and parameters, formulating relationships and finding solutions. You will also look at interpreting results and evaluating models. This course assumes that you have previously studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes and Analysing skid marks. First published on Mon, 13 Jun 2011 as Developing modelling skills. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Mathematics Education | Mathematics Education | MSXR209_3 | MSXR209_3

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Analysing skid marks Analysing skid marks

Description

This free course, Analysing skid marks, is the second in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. In it you are asked to relate the stages of the mathematical modelling process to a previously formulated mathematical model. This example, that of skid mark produced by vehicle tyres, is typical of accounts of modelling that you may see in books, or produced in the workplace. The aim of this course is to help you to draw out and to clarify mathematical modelling ideas by considering the example. It assumes that you have studied the course Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Analysing skid marks. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Analysing skid marks, is the second in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. In it you are asked to relate the stages of the mathematical modelling process to a previously formulated mathematical model. This example, that of skid mark produced by vehicle tyres, is typical of accounts of modelling that you may see in books, or produced in the workplace. The aim of this course is to help you to draw out and to clarify mathematical modelling ideas by considering the example. It assumes that you have studied the course Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Analysing skid marks. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Statistics | Statistics | MSXR209_2 | MSXR209_2

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Language and History

Description

Prof. Simon Horobin examines how the English language has changed over time, addressing such vexed questions as whether Jane Austen could spell, the fate of the apostrophe and whether people who 'literally' explode with anger are corrupting the language. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

masters | #greatwriters | language | MSt | english | oxford | masters | #greatwriters | language | MSt | english | oxford | 2012-10-09

License

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History of English Pronunciation

Description

Do we really know what Chaucer's poetry sounded like? Professor Simon Horobin introduces evidence that gives us an insight into the history of English pronunciation and explores what it tells us about how and why changes in language take place. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poem | masters | literature | language | tales | MSt | #greatwriters | chaucer | canterbury | english | oxford | poem | masters | literature | language | tales | MSt | #greatwriters | chaucer | canterbury | english | oxford

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT) 21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course covers techniques of creating narratives that take advantage of the flexibility of form offered by the computer. The course studies the structural properties of book-based narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time and of storyline. The class analyzes the structure and evaluates the literary qualities of computer-based narratives including hypertexts, adventure games, and classic artificial intelligence programs like Eliza. With this base, students use authoring systems to model a variety of narrative techniques and to create their own fictions. Knowledge of programming is helpful but not necessary. This course covers techniques of creating narratives that take advantage of the flexibility of form offered by the computer. The course studies the structural properties of book-based narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time and of storyline. The class analyzes the structure and evaluates the literary qualities of computer-based narratives including hypertexts, adventure games, and classic artificial intelligence programs like Eliza. With this base, students use authoring systems to model a variety of narrative techniques and to create their own fictions. Knowledge of programming is helpful but not necessary.

Subjects

multi-linear narrative | multi-linear narrative | nonlinear narrative | nonlinear narrative | digital | digital | media | media | communication culture | communication culture | gaming | gaming | television | television | digital aesthetics | digital aesthetics | contemporary art | contemporary art | film | film | synchronic narrative | synchronic narrative | contemporary media | contemporary media | digital narrative | digital narrative | video games | video games | game culture platforms | game culture platforms | Second Life | Second Life | LARP | LARP | ARG | ARG | MMO | MMO | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489 | CMS.845 | CMS.845

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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