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21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT) 21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)

Description

The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period. The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period.

Subjects

Renaissance | Renaissance | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Demography | Demography | Global Trade | Global Trade | Peasantry | Peasantry | The Black Death | Humanism | The Black Death | Humanism | Burgundy | Burgundy | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Christian Humanism | Christian Humanism | Martin Luther | Martin Luther

License

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Machine Learning I Machine Learning I

Description

The main goals of this course are: to introduce the basic concepts of Machine Learning and Big Data Machine Learning; to describe the main areas, techniques, and processes in Machine Learning; to introduce some of the main tools in (Big Data) Machine Learning The main goals of this course are: to introduce the basic concepts of Machine Learning and Big Data Machine Learning; to describe the main areas, techniques, and processes in Machine Learning; to introduce some of the main tools in (Big Data) Machine Learning

Subjects

Nearest neighbours | Nearest neighbours | Models for regression | Models for regression | MLLIB | MLLIB | Gradient Boosting | Gradient Boosting | Bagging | Bagging | Hyper-parameter optimization | Hyper-parameter optimization | Pyspark | Pyspark | Large scale machine learning | Large scale machine learning | Boosting | Boosting | Spark | Spark | 2016 | 2016 | Random Forests | Random Forests | Machine learning | Machine learning | Decision / regression trees and rules | Decision / regression trees and rules | Feature selection | Feature selection | Model evaluation | Model evaluation | Feature transformation | Feature transformation | ML | ML | Basic pipeline | Basic pipeline | Models for classification | Models for classification | MapReduce | MapReduce | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | Dimensionality reduction | Dimensionality reduction

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT) 21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)

Description

The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period. The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period.

Subjects

Renaissance | Renaissance | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Demography | Demography | Global Trade | Global Trade | Peasantry | Peasantry | The Black Death | Humanism | The Black Death | Humanism | Burgundy | Burgundy | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Christian Humanism | Christian Humanism | Martin Luther | Martin Luther | fourteenth-century Italy | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Geography | The Black Death | The Black Death | Humanism | Humanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT) 24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation? This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation?

Subjects

artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | psychology | psychology | philosophy | philosophy | Turing Machines | Turing Machines | consciousness | consciousness | computer limitations | computer limitations | computation | computation | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | Turing test | Turing test | the analog/digital distinction | the analog/digital distinction | Chinese Room argument | Chinese Room argument | causal efficacy of content | causal efficacy of content | inverted spectrum | inverted spectrum | mental representation | mental representation | procedural semantics | procedural semantics | connectionism | connectionism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.409 Algorithmic Aspects of Machine Learning (MIT) 18.409 Algorithmic Aspects of Machine Learning (MIT)

Description

This course is organized around algorithmic issues that arise in machine learning. Modern machine learning systems are often built on top of algorithms that do not have provable guarantees, and it is the subject of debate when and why they work. In this class, we focus on designing algorithms whose performance we can rigorously analyze for fundamental machine learning problems. This course is organized around algorithmic issues that arise in machine learning. Modern machine learning systems are often built on top of algorithms that do not have provable guarantees, and it is the subject of debate when and why they work. In this class, we focus on designing algorithms whose performance we can rigorously analyze for fundamental machine learning problems.

Subjects

Machine learning | Machine learning | nonnegative matrix factorization | nonnegative matrix factorization | tensor decomposition | tensor decomposition | tensor rank | tensor rank | border rank | border rank | sparse coding | sparse coding | sparse recovery | sparse recovery | learning mixture model | learning mixture model | matrix completion | matrix completion

License

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21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT) 21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)

Description

The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period. The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period.

Subjects

Renaissance | Renaissance | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Demography | Demography | Global Trade | Global Trade | Peasantry | Peasantry | The Black Death | Humanism | The Black Death | Humanism | Burgundy | Burgundy | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Christian Humanism | Christian Humanism | Martin Luther | Martin Luther | fourteenth-century Italy | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Geography | The Black Death | The Black Death | Humanism | Humanism

License

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11.902 Advanced Urban Public Finance: Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods (MIT) 11.902 Advanced Urban Public Finance: Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods (MIT)

Description

In analyzing fiscal issues, conventional public finance approaches focus mainly on taxation and public spending. Policymakers and practitioners rarely explore solutions by examining the fundamental problem: the failure of interested parties to act collectively to internalize the positive externalities generated by public goods. Public finance is merely one of many possible institutional arrangements for assigning the rights and responsibilities to public goods consumption. This system is currently under stress because of the financial crisis. The first part of the class will focus on collective action and its connection with local public finance. The second part will explore alternative institutional arrangements for mediating collective action problems associated with the provision of loc In analyzing fiscal issues, conventional public finance approaches focus mainly on taxation and public spending. Policymakers and practitioners rarely explore solutions by examining the fundamental problem: the failure of interested parties to act collectively to internalize the positive externalities generated by public goods. Public finance is merely one of many possible institutional arrangements for assigning the rights and responsibilities to public goods consumption. This system is currently under stress because of the financial crisis. The first part of the class will focus on collective action and its connection with local public finance. The second part will explore alternative institutional arrangements for mediating collective action problems associated with the provision of loc

Subjects

Advanced | Advanced | Urban | Urban | Public Finance | Public Finance | Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods | Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods | Machine | Machine | Technology | Technology | Globalization | Globalization | Cities | Cities | Culturing Life | Culturing Life | Economic Reform | Economic Reform | Public Policy | Public Policy | Education | Education | Social Movement | Social Movement | Current Crises | Current Crises | Nation | Nation | Economy | Economy | Social Science Analysis | Social Science Analysis | Social Reform | Social Reform | Economic Data | Economic Data | Suburban | Suburban | Neighborhood Composition | Neighborhood Composition | Infrastructure Development | Infrastructure Development | Changing Federal Policies | Changing Federal Policies | Wealth Transfer | Wealth Transfer | Social Groups | Social Groups | Data | Data

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.520 Statistical Learning Theory and Applications (MIT) 9.520 Statistical Learning Theory and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course is for upper-level graduate students who are planning careers in computational neuroscience. This course focuses on the problem of supervised learning from the perspective of modern statistical learning theory starting with the theory of multivariate function approximation from sparse data. It develops basic tools such as Regularization including Support Vector Machines for regression and classification. It derives generalization bounds using both stability and VC theory. It also discusses topics such as boosting and feature selection and examines applications in several areas: Computer Vision, Computer Graphics, Text Classification, and Bioinformatics. The final projects, hands-on applications, and exercises are designed to illustrate the rapidly increasing practical uses This course is for upper-level graduate students who are planning careers in computational neuroscience. This course focuses on the problem of supervised learning from the perspective of modern statistical learning theory starting with the theory of multivariate function approximation from sparse data. It develops basic tools such as Regularization including Support Vector Machines for regression and classification. It derives generalization bounds using both stability and VC theory. It also discusses topics such as boosting and feature selection and examines applications in several areas: Computer Vision, Computer Graphics, Text Classification, and Bioinformatics. The final projects, hands-on applications, and exercises are designed to illustrate the rapidly increasing practical uses

Subjects

supervised learning | supervised learning | statistical learning | statistical learning | multivariate function | multivariate function | Support Vector Machines | Support Vector Machines | regression | regression | classification | classification | VC theory | VC theory | computer vision | computer vision | computer graphics | computer graphics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

18.311 Principles of Continuum Applied Mathematics covers fundamental concepts in continuous applied mathematics, including applications from traffic flow, fluids, elasticity, granular flows, etc. The class also covers continuum limit; conservation laws, quasi-equilibrium; kinematic waves; characteristics, simple waves, shocks; diffusion (linear and nonlinear); numerical solution of wave equations; finite differences, consistency, stability; discrete and fast Fourier transforms; spectral methods; transforms and series (Fourier, Laplace). Additional topics may include sonic booms, Mach cone, caustics, lattices, dispersion, and group velocity. 18.311 Principles of Continuum Applied Mathematics covers fundamental concepts in continuous applied mathematics, including applications from traffic flow, fluids, elasticity, granular flows, etc. The class also covers continuum limit; conservation laws, quasi-equilibrium; kinematic waves; characteristics, simple waves, shocks; diffusion (linear and nonlinear); numerical solution of wave equations; finite differences, consistency, stability; discrete and fast Fourier transforms; spectral methods; transforms and series (Fourier, Laplace). Additional topics may include sonic booms, Mach cone, caustics, lattices, dispersion, and group velocity.

Subjects

partial differential equation | partial differential equation | hyperbolic equations | hyperbolic equations | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | hyperbolic systems | hyperbolic systems | diffusion and reaction processes | diffusion and reaction processes | continuum models | continuum models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | continuous applied mathematics | continuous applied mathematics | traffic flow | traffic flow | fluids | fluids | elasticity | elasticity | granular flows | granular flows | continuum limit | continuum limit | conservation laws | conservation laws | quasi-equilibrium | quasi-equilibrium | kinematic waves | kinematic waves | characteristics | characteristics | simple waves | simple waves | shocks | shocks | diffusion (linear and nonlinear) | diffusion (linear and nonlinear) | numerical solution of wave equations | numerical solution of wave equations | finite differences | finite differences | consistency | consistency | stability | stability | discrete and fast Fourier transforms | discrete and fast Fourier transforms | spectral methods | spectral methods | transforms and series (Fourier | Laplace) | transforms and series (Fourier | Laplace) | sonic booms | sonic booms | Mach cone | Mach cone | caustics | caustics | lattices | lattices | dispersion | dispersion | group velocity | group velocity

License

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

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STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT) STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This class will study some of the changing ideas within modern physics, ranging from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to solid-state physics, nuclear and elementary particles, and cosmology. These ideas will be situated within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts. The overall aim is to understand the changing roles of physics and of physicists over the course of the twentieth century. This class will study some of the changing ideas within modern physics, ranging from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to solid-state physics, nuclear and elementary particles, and cosmology. These ideas will be situated within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts. The overall aim is to understand the changing roles of physics and of physicists over the course of the twentieth century.

Subjects

relativity theory | relativity theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | solid-state physics | solid-state physics | elementary particles | elementary particles | quarks | quarks | cosmology | cosmology | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | Maxwell | Maxwell | Mach | Mach | Bohr | Bohr | Heisenberg | Heisenberg | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | Poincar? | Poincar? | Schr?dinger | Schr?dinger | nuclear particles | nuclear particles | physics | physics | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | physicists | physicists | institutional | political | cultural context | institutional | political | cultural context | STS.042 | STS.042 | 8.225 | 8.225

License

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9.520-A Networks for Learning: Regression and Classification (MIT) 9.520-A Networks for Learning: Regression and Classification (MIT)

Description

The course focuses on the problem of supervised learning within the framework of Statistical Learning Theory. It starts with a review of classical statistical techniques, including Regularization Theory in RKHS for multivariate function approximation from sparse data. Next, VC theory is discussed in detail and used to justify classification and regression techniques such as Regularization Networks and Support Vector Machines. Selected topics such as boosting, feature selection and multiclass classification will complete the theory part of the course. During the course we will examine applications of several learning techniques in areas such as computer vision, computer graphics, database search and time-series analysis and prediction. We will briefly discuss implications of learning theori The course focuses on the problem of supervised learning within the framework of Statistical Learning Theory. It starts with a review of classical statistical techniques, including Regularization Theory in RKHS for multivariate function approximation from sparse data. Next, VC theory is discussed in detail and used to justify classification and regression techniques such as Regularization Networks and Support Vector Machines. Selected topics such as boosting, feature selection and multiclass classification will complete the theory part of the course. During the course we will examine applications of several learning techniques in areas such as computer vision, computer graphics, database search and time-series analysis and prediction. We will briefly discuss implications of learning theori

Subjects

Learning | Learning | Perspective | Perspective | Regularized | Regularized | Kernel Hilbert Spaces | Kernel Hilbert Spaces | Approximation | Approximation | Nonparametric | Nonparametric | Ridge Approximation | Ridge Approximation | Networks | Networks | Finance | Finance | Statistical Learning Theory | Statistical Learning Theory | Consistency | Consistency | Empirical Risk | Empirical Risk | Minimization Principle | Minimization Principle | VC-Dimension | VC-Dimension | VC-bounds | VC-bounds | Regression | Regression | Structural Risk Minimization | Structural Risk Minimization | Support Vector Machines | Support Vector Machines | Kernel Engineering | Kernel Engineering | Computer Vision | Computer Vision | Computer Graphics | Computer Graphics | Neuroscience | Neuroscience | Approximation Error | Approximation Error | Approximation Theory | Approximation Theory | Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | Bagging | Bagging | Boosting | Boosting | Wavelets | Wavelets | Frames | Frames

License

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9.520 Statistical Learning Theory and Applications (MIT) 9.520 Statistical Learning Theory and Applications (MIT)

Description

Focuses on the problem of supervised learning from the perspective of modern statistical learning theory starting with the theory of multivariate function approximation from sparse data. Develops basic tools such as Regularization including Support Vector Machines for regression and classification. Derives generalization bounds using both stability and VC theory. Discusses topics such as boosting and feature selection. Examines applications in several areas: computer vision, computer graphics, text classification and bioinformatics. Final projects and hands-on applications and exercises are planned, paralleling the rapidly increasing practical uses of the techniques described in the subject. Focuses on the problem of supervised learning from the perspective of modern statistical learning theory starting with the theory of multivariate function approximation from sparse data. Develops basic tools such as Regularization including Support Vector Machines for regression and classification. Derives generalization bounds using both stability and VC theory. Discusses topics such as boosting and feature selection. Examines applications in several areas: computer vision, computer graphics, text classification and bioinformatics. Final projects and hands-on applications and exercises are planned, paralleling the rapidly increasing practical uses of the techniques described in the subject.

Subjects

supervised learning | supervised learning | statistical learning | statistical learning | multivariate function | multivariate function | Support Vector Machines | Support Vector Machines | regression | regression | classification | classification | VC theory | VC theory | computer vision | computer vision | computer graphics | computer graphics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics

License

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Political ideas in revolution Political ideas in revolution

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | module code M11001 | module code M11001 | history of western political thought | history of western political thought | module code M11151 | module code M11151 | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Niccolo Machiavelli | Niccolo Machiavelli | Thomas Hobbes | Thomas Hobbes | John Locke | John Locke | ancient and modern political thought and practices | ancient and modern political thought and practices

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT) 14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the evolution of the modern capitalist economy and evaluates its current structure and performance. Various paradigms of economics are contrasted and compared (neoclassical, Marxist, socioeconomic, and neocorporate) in order to understand how modern capitalism has been shaped and how it functions in today's economy. The course stresses general analytic reasoning and problem formulation rather than specific analytic techniques. Readings include classics in economic thought as well as contemporary analyses. This course addresses the evolution of the modern capitalist economy and evaluates its current structure and performance. Various paradigms of economics are contrasted and compared (neoclassical, Marxist, socioeconomic, and neocorporate) in order to understand how modern capitalism has been shaped and how it functions in today's economy. The course stresses general analytic reasoning and problem formulation rather than specific analytic techniques. Readings include classics in economic thought as well as contemporary analyses.

Subjects

capitalism | capitalism | markets | markets | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | scientific paradigm | scientific paradigm | liberalism | liberalism | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | Marxism | Marxism | corporate state | corporate state | social embeddedness | social embeddedness | economic activity | economic activity | The Fountainhead | The Fountainhead | Ayn Rand | Ayn Rand | Double Helix | Double Helix | James Watson | James Watson | Tracy Kidder | Tracy Kidder | Soul of the New Machine | Soul of the New Machine | industrial state | industrial state | individualism | individualism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CC.111 Modern Conceptions of Freedom (MIT) CC.111 Modern Conceptions of Freedom (MIT)

Description

This course examines the modern definition of freedom, and the obligations that people accept in honoring it. It investigates how these obligations are captured in the principles of our political associations. This course also studies how the centrality of freedom plays out in the political thought of such authors as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and Montesquieu, as well as debating which notions of freedom inspire and sustain the American experiment by careful reading of the documents and arguments of the founding of the United States. This course is part of the Concourse program at MIT. This course examines the modern definition of freedom, and the obligations that people accept in honoring it. It investigates how these obligations are captured in the principles of our political associations. This course also studies how the centrality of freedom plays out in the political thought of such authors as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke and Montesquieu, as well as debating which notions of freedom inspire and sustain the American experiment by careful reading of the documents and arguments of the founding of the United States. This course is part of the Concourse program at MIT.

Subjects

enlightenment | enlightenment | the Constitution | the Constitution | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Hobbes | Hobbes | Locke | Locke | Rousseau | Rousseau | Tocqueville | Tocqueville | Nietzche | Nietzche | founders | founders | liberty | liberty | popular sovereignty | popular sovereignty | human nature | human nature | politics | politics | Leviathan | Leviathan | government | government | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | American constitutionalism | American constitutionalism | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | equality | equality | statesmanship | statesmanship | Lincoln | Lincoln | modernity | modernity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Formal Languages and Automata Theory Formal Languages and Automata Theory

Description

Basic course on Automata Theory and Formal Languages ??aimed at students of the Computer Science Degree . The common competences of the course to Computer Science are: Knowledge and application of basic algorithms and procedures of Computer Science to design solutions to problems, and analyze the suitability and complexity of the proposed algorithms; Knowledge and application of basic techniques and principles of intelligent systems and their practical application. Basic course on Automata Theory and Formal Languages ??aimed at students of the Computer Science Degree . The common competences of the course to Computer Science are: Knowledge and application of basic algorithms and procedures of Computer Science to design solutions to problems, and analyze the suitability and complexity of the proposed algorithms; Knowledge and application of basic techniques and principles of intelligent systems and their practical application.

Subjects

Finite Automata | Finite Automata | Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos | Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos | Regular Expressions | Regular Expressions | Automata Theory | Automata Theory | Turing Machines | Turing Machines | Computational Complexity | Computational Complexity | Context-Free Languages | Context-Free Languages | Chomsky Hierarchy | Chomsky Hierarchy | Formal languages | Formal languages | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | 2014 | 2014 | a Informtica | a Informtica | Regular Languages | Regular Languages | Push-Down Automata | Push-Down Automata

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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A railwayman goes to war: Francis Dent and the challenge of total war A railwayman goes to war: Francis Dent and the challenge of total war

Description

Francis Henry Dent was born at Holyhead on New Year’s Eve 1866, where his father, Admiral Charles Bayley Calmady Dent, was employed as the Marine Superintendent of the London & North-Western Railway. At the age of seventeen the young Francis … Continue reading → Francis Henry Dent was born at Holyhead on New Year’s Eve 1866, where his father, Admiral Charles Bayley Calmady Dent, was employed as the Marine Superintendent of the London & North-Western Railway. At the age of seventeen the young Francis … Continue reading →

Subjects

Machine | Machine | Unconventional Soldiers | Unconventional Soldiers | 355 (Military science) | 355 (Military science) | 358 (Other specialized forces & services) | 358 (Other specialized forces & services) | 610 (Medical Sciences) | 610 (Medical Sciences) | U (Military Science) | U (Military Science) | UA (Armies: Organization ? distribution ? military situation) | UA (Armies: Organization ? distribution ? military situation) | ww1 | ww1 | 358 (Other specialized forces & services) | 358 (Other specialized forces & services)

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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citizen soldiers: recruiting technical experts on the Western Front citizen soldiers: recruiting technical experts on the Western Front The 'other' citizen soldiers: recruiting technical experts on the Western Front The 'other' citizen soldiers: recruiting technical experts on the Western Front

Description

The term ‘citizen soldier’ evokes a particularly powerful image in Britain. The poignant histories of the ‘Pals’ Battalions’, raised utilizing the attraction of geographical and occupational connections, have contributed greatly to the lasting public impression of the conflict. Names such … Continue reading → The term ‘citizen soldier’ evokes a particularly powerful image in Britain. The poignant histories of the ‘Pals’ Battalions’, raised utilizing the attraction of geographical and occupational connections, have contributed greatly to the lasting public impression of the conflict. Names such … Continue reading →

Subjects

Machine | Machine | Unconventional Soldiers | Unconventional Soldiers | 355 (Military science) | 355 (Military science) | 358 (Other specialized forces & services) | 358 (Other specialized forces & services) | 900 (History & geography) | 900 (History & geography) | U (Military Science) | U (Military Science) | UA (Armies: Organization - distribution - military situation) | UA (Armies: Organization - distribution - military situation) | UG (Military engineering. Air forces) | UG (Military engineering. Air forces) | 358 (Other specialized forces & services) | 358 (Other specialized forces & services) | 900 (History & geography) | 900 (History & geography)

License

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The Language of Business: Understanding the British ‘war machine’ The Language of Business: Understanding the British ‘war machine’

Description

In 1917, the American journalist Isaac Frederick Marcosson visited the General Headquarters [GHQ] of the British Expeditionary Force [BEF] at Montreuil-sur-Mer following a tour of the Western Front. He recorded his experiences of this visit for Everybody’s Magazine and in … Continue reading → In 1917, the American journalist Isaac Frederick Marcosson visited the General Headquarters [GHQ] of the British Expeditionary Force [BEF] at Montreuil-sur-Mer following a tour of the Western Front. He recorded his experiences of this visit for Everybody’s Magazine and in … Continue reading →

Subjects

Machine | Machine | 355 (Military science) | 355 (Military science) | 356 (Foot forces & warfare) | 356 (Foot forces & warfare) | 900 (History & geography) | 900 (History & geography) | 940 (General history of Europe) | 940 (General history of Europe) | Blogs | Blogs | U (Military Science) | U (Military Science) | UA (Armies: Organization - distribution - military situation) | UA (Armies: Organization - distribution - military situation) | 356 (Foot forces & warfare) | 356 (Foot forces & warfare) | 900 (History & geography) | 900 (History & geography)

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.716 Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature (MIT) 21G.716 Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature (MIT)

Description

This course studies representative twentieth and twenty-first-century texts and films from Hispanic America and Spain. Emphasis is on developing strategies for analyzing the genres of the novel, the short story, the poem, the fictional film, and the theatrical script. The novels read this semester are Magali García Ramis's Felices días, Tío Sergio (1986, Puerto Rico) and Javier Cercas's Soldados de Salamina (2001, Spain). We will study Lorca's play "La casa de Bernarda Alba" (1936, Spain), films from Spain, México, and Cuba, poems by Darío (Nicaragua), Machado (Spain), Lorca (Spain), Hernández (Spain), Vallejo (Perú), Cernuda (Spain), and Luis Palés Matos (Puerto Rico), and short stories from México (by an exiled Spanish writer), Chile, Argentina, and Cuba. Thematic e This course studies representative twentieth and twenty-first-century texts and films from Hispanic America and Spain. Emphasis is on developing strategies for analyzing the genres of the novel, the short story, the poem, the fictional film, and the theatrical script. The novels read this semester are Magali García Ramis's Felices días, Tío Sergio (1986, Puerto Rico) and Javier Cercas's Soldados de Salamina (2001, Spain). We will study Lorca's play "La casa de Bernarda Alba" (1936, Spain), films from Spain, México, and Cuba, poems by Darío (Nicaragua), Machado (Spain), Lorca (Spain), Hernández (Spain), Vallejo (Perú), Cernuda (Spain), and Luis Palés Matos (Puerto Rico), and short stories from México (by an exiled Spanish writer), Chile, Argentina, and Cuba. Thematic e

Subjects

introduction | introduction | hispanic | hispanic | contemporary | contemporary | literature | literature | Magali Garcia Ramis | Magali Garcia Ramis | Javier Cercas | Javier Cercas | Rub?n Dar?o | Rub?n Dar?o | Luis Bu?uel | Luis Bu?uel | Salvador Dal? | Salvador Dal? | Un chien andalou | Un chien andalou | Antonio Machado | Antonio Machado | Federico Garc?a Lorca | Federico Garc?a Lorca | Miguel Hern?ndez | Miguel Hern?ndez | C?sar Vallejo | C?sar Vallejo | La casa de Bernarda Alba | La casa de Bernarda Alba | Max Aub | Max Aub | El remate | El remate | Felices d?as | Felices d?as | T?o Sergio | T?o Sergio | Luis Pal?s Matos | Luis Pal?s Matos | Soldados de Salamina | Soldados de Salamina | David Trueba | David Trueba | Rafael S?nchez Mazas | Rafael S?nchez Mazas | Ciriaco P?rez Bustamante | Ciriaco P?rez Bustamante | Marilyn Bobes | Marilyn Bobes | Ingrid Kummels | Ingrid Kummels | Ic?ar Bolla?n | Ic?ar Bolla?n | Flores de otro mundo | Flores de otro mundo | La vida es silbar | La vida es silbar | Jorge Luis Borges | Jorge Luis Borges | Rosario Ferr? | Rosario Ferr? | Roberto Bola?o | Roberto Bola?o | short story | short story | novel | novel | latin american experience | latin american experience | spanish | spanish

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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