Searching for Mexico : 47 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2

21G.S01 Modern Mexico: Representations of Mexico City's Urban Life (MIT) 21G.S01 Modern Mexico: Representations of Mexico City's Urban Life (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to offer a general introduction to 20th and 21st century literature and cultural production about Modern Mexico. Emphasis will be placed on the way intellectuals and artists have presented the changes in Mexico City's urban life, and how these representations question themes and trends in national identity, state control, globalization, and immigration. The goal of this course is to offer a general introduction to 20th and 21st century literature and cultural production about Modern Mexico. Emphasis will be placed on the way intellectuals and artists have presented the changes in Mexico City's urban life, and how these representations question themes and trends in national identity, state control, globalization, and immigration.

Subjects

Mexico | Mexico | Mexico City | Mexico City | urban | urban | literature | literature | visual arts | visual arts | film | film | culture | culture | modern history | modern history | 20th century | 20th century | 21st century | 21st century | national identity | national identity | state control | state control | globalization | globalization | immigration | immigration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT) 21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT)

Description

This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City. This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City.

Subjects

immigration | immigration | migration | migration | lawrence | lawrence | chinatown | chinatown | U.S.-Mexico border | U.S.-Mexico border | Great Migration | Great Migration | The Jazz Singer | The Jazz Singer | Lower East Side | Lower East Side | ethnicity | ethnicity | New York City | New York City | New Immigration | New Immigration | Filipino | Filipino | american imperialism | american imperialism | cuban-american | cuban-american | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | caribbean migration | caribbean migration | asian immigration | asian immigration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Multidimensional Poverty Measure: A Comparative Study of Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Populations

Description

Mexico's 'Official' Multidimensional Poverty Measure: A Comparative Study of Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Populations. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poverty measurement | Multidimensional Poverty | poverty | Mexico | poverty measurement | Multidimensional Poverty | poverty | Mexico

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129111/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others. This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others.

Subjects

challenge | challenge | world poverty | world poverty | economics | economics | per capita income | per capita income | health | health | fertility | fertility | mortality | mortality | birth | birth | death | death | microfinance | microfinance | NGOs | NGOs | poor | poor | education | education | colonialism | colonialism | globalization | globalization | corruption | corruption | India | India | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | economic growth | economic growth | development | development | credit markets | credit markets | prosperity | prosperity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT) 21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT)

Description

This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Issues studied include Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the U.S., dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, African and Indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, and Latin American identity. This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Issues studied include Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the U.S., dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, African and Indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, and Latin American identity.

Subjects

Latin America | Latin America | wars of independence | wars of independence | global economy | global economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | Mexico | Mexico | Cuba | Cuba | Central America | Central America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

THEMIS: The impact of sending states’ transnational policies on migration dynamics: a comparative analysis of South American cases

Description

Ana Margheritis presents her paper 'The impact of sending states’ transnational policies on migration dynamics: a comparative analysis of South American cases' in Parallel session III(B) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond The phenomenon of state-led transnationalism (i.e., the policies and programs that nation-states implement to reach out to their citizens abroad) is relatively under-studied within both migration and international relations studies. Although those policies have expanded lately in all regions, the literature is still overwhelmingly concerned with issues that affect receiving (rather than sending) countries, the economic (rather than political) impact of migration, bottom-up transnational practices and networks, and a few cases. The mec

Subjects

THEMIS | migration | transnational policies | ecuador | argentina | Mexico | Uruguay | THEMIS | migration | transnational policies | ecuador | argentina | Mexico | Uruguay | 2013-09-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://rss.oucs.ox.ac.uk/qeh/imi-podcast-audio/rss20.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.53 Democratization in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (MIT) 17.53 Democratization in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (MIT)

Description

Recent years have seen an astonishing spread of democracy to many African, Asian, and Latin American countries. What caused these dramatic political transitions? What challenges do democratizing countries in the Third World face? Will these new democracies endure? We will take up these questions using film, fiction, and popular journalism, as well as scholarly research. We will also focus on a small number of countries (Brazil, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Senegal, Singapore, and Sri Lanka) in order to explore in greater depth some of the most important political challenges faced by developing countries. Although the class focuses on the developing world, many of the lessons should "travel" to democratizing countries in other regions. Recent years have seen an astonishing spread of democracy to many African, Asian, and Latin American countries. What caused these dramatic political transitions? What challenges do democratizing countries in the Third World face? Will these new democracies endure? We will take up these questions using film, fiction, and popular journalism, as well as scholarly research. We will also focus on a small number of countries (Brazil, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Senegal, Singapore, and Sri Lanka) in order to explore in greater depth some of the most important political challenges faced by developing countries. Although the class focuses on the developing world, many of the lessons should "travel" to democratizing countries in other regions.

Subjects

Sri Lanka | Sri Lanka | Singapore | Singapore | Senegal | Senegal | Nigeria | Nigeria | Mexico | Mexico | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Third World | Third World | Latin America | Latin America | Asian | Asian | Africa | Africa | Democracy | Democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | Corruption | Corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.735 Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film: The Films of Luis Buñuel (MIT) 21G.735 Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film: The Films of Luis Buñuel (MIT)

Description

This course considers films spanning the entire career of pioneering Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel (1900–1983), from his silent surrealist classic of 1929, Un perro andaluz, to his last film, Ese oscuro objeto del deseo (1977). We pay special attention to his Mexican period, in exile, and the films he made in, and about, Spain, including his work in documentary. It explores Buñuel's early friendship with painter Salvador Dalí and poet Federico García Lorca, surrealist aesthetics, the influence of Freud's ideas on dreams and sexuality, and the director's corrosive criticism of bourgeois society and the Catholic church. We will focus on historical contexts and relevant film criticism. About This Course on OpenCourseWare The instructor of this course, Elizabeth Garrels, is a Prof This course considers films spanning the entire career of pioneering Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel (1900–1983), from his silent surrealist classic of 1929, Un perro andaluz, to his last film, Ese oscuro objeto del deseo (1977). We pay special attention to his Mexican period, in exile, and the films he made in, and about, Spain, including his work in documentary. It explores Buñuel's early friendship with painter Salvador Dalí and poet Federico García Lorca, surrealist aesthetics, the influence of Freud's ideas on dreams and sexuality, and the director's corrosive criticism of bourgeois society and the Catholic church. We will focus on historical contexts and relevant film criticism. About This Course on OpenCourseWare The instructor of this course, Elizabeth Garrels, is a Prof

Subjects

film | film | film studies | film studies | film criticism | film criticism | Luis Bunuel | Luis Bunuel | Freud | Freud | Salvador Dali | Salvador Dali | silent film | silent film | surrealism | surrealism | Federico Garcia Lorca | Federico Garcia Lorca | Mexico | Mexico | Spain | Spain | film history | film history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 17.55J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate. Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Latin America, drawing on films, literature, popular press accounts, and scholarly research. Topics include economic development, ethnic and racial identity, religion, revolution, democracy, transitional justice, and the rule of law. Examples draw on a range of countries in the region, especially Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. Includes a heavy oral participation component, with regular breakout groups, formal class presentations on pressing social issues (such as criminal justice and land tenure), and a structured class debate.

Subjects

17.55 | 17.55 | 21A.430 | 21A.430 | 21G.084 | 21G.084 | Mexico | Mexico | Venezuela | Venezuela | Brazil | Brazil | Chile | Chile | Latin America | Latin America | Spanish | Spanish | conquest | conquest | authoritarianism | authoritarianism | democracy | democracy | dictators | dictators | argentina | argentina | united states foreign policy | united states foreign policy | urbanization | urbanization | poverty | poverty | Big Mama's Funeral | Big Mama's Funeral | development | development | Pinochet | Pinochet | Allende | Allende | civilian-military relations | civilian-military relations | police reform | police reform | corruption | corruption | The House of Spirits | The House of Spirits | The Battle of Chile | The Battle of Chile | chinchillas | chinchillas

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.232 Business Model Innovation: Global Health in Frontier Markets (MIT) 15.232 Business Model Innovation: Global Health in Frontier Markets (MIT)

Description

This course explores successful approaches to delivering healthcare in challenging settings. We analyze organizations to find why some fall short while others grow in size and contribute to the health of the people they serve, and explore promising business models and social enterprise innovations. This course explores successful approaches to delivering healthcare in challenging settings. We analyze organizations to find why some fall short while others grow in size and contribute to the health of the people they serve, and explore promising business models and social enterprise innovations.

Subjects

global health | global health | healthcare | healthcare | health delivery | health delivery | globalhealth | globalhealth | business model | business model | clinic | clinic | hospital | hospital | cost analysis | cost analysis | strategy | strategy | operations | operations | marketing | marketing | technology | technology | revenue model | revenue model | Africa | Africa | India | India | Nepal | Nepal | Mexico | Mexico | Ecuador | Ecuador | Burundi | Burundi | Greece | Greece

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.S01 Modern Mexico: Representations of Mexico City's Urban Life (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to offer a general introduction to 20th and 21st century literature and cultural production about Modern Mexico. Emphasis will be placed on the way intellectuals and artists have presented the changes in Mexico City's urban life, and how these representations question themes and trends in national identity, state control, globalization, and immigration.

Subjects

Mexico | Mexico City | urban | literature | visual arts | film | culture | modern history | 20th century | 21st century | national identity | state control | globalization | immigration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries. This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries.

Subjects

democracy | democracy | economic development | economic development | politics | politics | Germany | Germany | Iraq | Iraq | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | Middle East | Middle East | Latin America | Latin America | Africa | Africa | South Asia | South Asia | East Asia | East Asia | Greece | Greece | Aristotle | Aristotle | foreign affairs | foreign affairs | Lee Kuan Yew | Lee Kuan Yew | democratic institution | democratic institution | social divisions | social divisions | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | Karl Marx | Karl Marx | Communist Party | Communist Party | leadership | leadership | polarization | polarization | gridlock | gridlock | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Weimar Republic | Weimar Republic | imposed sovereignty | imposed sovereignty | Austri | Austri | regime breakdown | regime breakdown | Brazil | Brazil | capitalism | capitalism | industrial policy | industrial policy | women's emancipation | women's emancipation | women's suffrage | women's suffrage | Athens | Athens | the Constitution | the Constitution | reform | reform | presidentialism | presidentialism | federalism | federalism | bicameralism | bicameralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Immigrant Integration and Human Rights: Lessons from the US-Mexico Border

Description

Discussion on the problematic of discussing integration in a context of security enforcement policies in the US and neoliberal policies, with a focus on immigrants in the US/Mexico border region and in the US as a whole. 'Integration' is a term that is used in many different places and contexts and is increasingly prominent within public debates about migration in the UK and elsewhere in the West. 'Integration' remains vague in definition, which is perhaps one reason it can be useful in many varying contexts. Is it a new assimilationism, a reactionary retreat from multiculturalism, or a progressive, dynamic model for thinking about diversity? How does it relate to cohesion, to transnationalism and to cosmopolitanism? Can, and should, it be measured and monitored? How is it framed in re Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

united states | america | Mexico | immigration | migration | united states | america | Mexico | immigration | migration | 2010-11-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129204/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

? transnational policies on migration dynamics: a comparative analysis of South American cases

Description

Ana Margheritis presents her paper 'The impact of sending states? transnational policies on migration dynamics: a comparative analysis of South American cases' in Parallel session III(B) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond The phenomenon of state-led transnationalism (i.e., the policies and programs that nation-states implement to reach out to their citizens abroad) is relatively under-studied within both migration and international relations studies. Although those policies have expanded lately in all regions, the literature is still overwhelmingly concerned with issues that affect receiving (rather than sending) countries, the economic (rather than political) impact of migration, bottom-up transnational practices and networks, and a few cases. The mec Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

THEMIS | migration | transnational policies | ecuador | argentina | Mexico | Uruguay | THEMIS | migration | transnational policies | ecuador | argentina | Mexico | Uruguay | 2013-09-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129209/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.53 Democratization in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (MIT) 17.53 Democratization in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (MIT)

Description

Recent years have seen an astonishing spread of democracy to many African, Asian, and Latin American countries. What caused these dramatic political transitions? What challenges do democratizing countries in the Third World face? Will these new democracies endure? We will take up these questions using film, fiction, and popular journalism, as well as scholarly research. We will also focus on a small number of countries (Brazil, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Senegal, Singapore, and Sri Lanka) in order to explore in greater depth some of the most important political challenges faced by developing countries. Although the class focuses on the developing world, many of the lessons should "travel" to democratizing countries in other regions. Recent years have seen an astonishing spread of democracy to many African, Asian, and Latin American countries. What caused these dramatic political transitions? What challenges do democratizing countries in the Third World face? Will these new democracies endure? We will take up these questions using film, fiction, and popular journalism, as well as scholarly research. We will also focus on a small number of countries (Brazil, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Senegal, Singapore, and Sri Lanka) in order to explore in greater depth some of the most important political challenges faced by developing countries. Although the class focuses on the developing world, many of the lessons should "travel" to democratizing countries in other regions.

Subjects

Sri Lanka | Sri Lanka | Singapore | Singapore | Senegal | Senegal | Nigeria | Nigeria | Mexico | Mexico | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Third World | Third World | Latin America | Latin America | Asian | Asian | Africa | Africa | Democracy | Democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT) 21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT)

Description

This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence at the start of the nineteenth century to the present. Issues studied will include independence and its aftermath, Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the US, dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, and revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America. This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence at the start of the nineteenth century to the present. Issues studied will include independence and its aftermath, Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the US, dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, and revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America.

Subjects

Latin America | Latin America | wars of independence | wars of independence | global economy | global economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | Mexico | Mexico | Cuba | Cuba | Central America | Central America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT)

Description

This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Issues studied include Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the U.S., dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, African and Indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, and Latin American identity.

Subjects

Latin America | wars of independence | global economy | dictatorship | democracy | Mexico | Cuba | Central America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.S67 Landscape Experience: Seminar in Land/Art (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores “land” as a genre, theme, and medium of art and architecture of the last five decades. Focusing largely on work within the boundaries of the United States, the course seeks to understand how the use of land in art and architecture is bound into complicated entanglements of property and power, the inheritances of non-U.S. traditions, and the violence of colonial ambitions. The term “landscape” is variously deployed in the service of a range of political and philosophical positions.

Subjects

landscape | art | architecture | Utah | Arizona | New Mexico | Texas | United States | property | power | tradition | political positions | philosophical positions | pilgrimage | property development | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Olympic Games and Politics

Description

?political? Olympic Games are undoubtedly Berlin, 1936; Mexico, 1968; and Munich, 1972.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | discussion starter | discuss | oxb:060111:004dd | Berlin 1936 | politics | political issues | racism | equality | Mexico City 1968 | OPHR | Olympic Project for Human Rights | Munich 1972 | Munich massacre | hospitality | leisure | sport | tourism | Team GB | The Olympics Ethics and Values | The Olympics Impact and Legacy | The Olympics and Politics.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Race and Ethnicity in the Olympic Games

Description

On October 2, 1968, more than 300 students and workers at La Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco, Mexico City were gunned down by police, on the order of former President Luis Echeverria. Those that lost their lives were protesting against the staging of the Olympic Games in a country that was struggling with poverty and an endemic lack of funding in vital public services such as education and healthcare.

Subjects

oxb:060111:014cs | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | Race and ethnicity | race | ethnicity | equality | black power | Mexico City 1968 | Munich 1972 | OPHR | Olympic Project for Human Rights | Joe Lewis | boycott | protest | racism | Berlin 1936 | Maccabi Games 2007 | The Olympics Impact and Legacy.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata