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4.615 The Architecture of Cairo (MIT) 4.615 The Architecture of Cairo (MIT)

Description

Cairo is the quintessential Islamic city. Founded in 634 at the strategic head of the Nile Delta, the city evolved from an Islamic military outpost to the seat of the ambitious Fatimid caliphate which flourished between the 10th and 12th century. Its most spectacular age, however, was the Mamluk period (1250-1517), when it became the uncontested center of a resurgent Islam and acquired an architectural character that symbolized the image of the Islamic city for centuries to come. Cairo today still shines as a cultural and political center in its three spheres of influence: the Arab world, Africa, and the Islamic world. Moreover, many of its monuments (456 registered by the 1951 Survey of the Islamic Monuments of Cairo) still stand, although they remain largely unknown to the world’s Cairo is the quintessential Islamic city. Founded in 634 at the strategic head of the Nile Delta, the city evolved from an Islamic military outpost to the seat of the ambitious Fatimid caliphate which flourished between the 10th and 12th century. Its most spectacular age, however, was the Mamluk period (1250-1517), when it became the uncontested center of a resurgent Islam and acquired an architectural character that symbolized the image of the Islamic city for centuries to come. Cairo today still shines as a cultural and political center in its three spheres of influence: the Arab world, Africa, and the Islamic world. Moreover, many of its monuments (456 registered by the 1951 Survey of the Islamic Monuments of Cairo) still stand, although they remain largely unknown to the world’s

Subjects

religious architecture | religious architecture | islamic architecture | islamic architecture | cairo | cairo | urban planning | urban planning | muslim architecture | muslim architecture | egyption architecture | egyption architecture | arab architecture | arab architecture | north africa | north africa | mediterannean | mediterannean | nile river | nile river | Islamic Architecture | Islamic Architecture | Cairo | Cairo | Muslim Architecture | Muslim Architecture | Cities | Cities | Urban Architecture | Urban Architecture | Urban History | Urban History

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Session 3: Regional Consequences of the Suppression of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt

Description

Part of a seminar on the relationship between religion and politics in Egypt. Session 3 included two talks: 'Regional Consequences of the Suppression of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt' - Dr Ewan Stein 'Islamist-Military Relations and the Crisis of Secular Democracy in Egypt' - Dr Omar Ashour Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Muslim Brotherhood | egypt | democracy | Islamist | Muslim Brotherhood | egypt | democracy | Islamist

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21M.289 Islam/Media (MIT) 21M.289 Islam/Media (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to Islam from the perspective of media and sound studies, intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. From the time of the Prophet Muhammad, Islam in its various manifestations has had a complex relationship with media. While much contemporary writing focuses on Islam in the media, this course explores how many aspects of Islamic practice and thinking might be understood as media technologies that facilitate the inscription, storage and transmission of knowledge. Central questions include: How do Islam and media technologies relate? What kinds of practices of inscription and transmission characterize Islam in all its varieties across time and place? How might Islamic thought and practice be understood in light of databases, networks, and audio This course is an introduction to Islam from the perspective of media and sound studies, intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. From the time of the Prophet Muhammad, Islam in its various manifestations has had a complex relationship with media. While much contemporary writing focuses on Islam in the media, this course explores how many aspects of Islamic practice and thinking might be understood as media technologies that facilitate the inscription, storage and transmission of knowledge. Central questions include: How do Islam and media technologies relate? What kinds of practices of inscription and transmission characterize Islam in all its varieties across time and place? How might Islamic thought and practice be understood in light of databases, networks, and audio

Subjects

Qur'an | Qur'an | hadith | hadith | middle east | middle east | Muslim | Muslim | sound | sound | Islamic art | Islamic art | video | video | jihad | jihad | pilgrimage | pilgrimage | hajj | hajj | protest | protest | women in islam | women in islam | ISIS | ISIS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sacred calendars : Ramadan Sacred calendars : Ramadan

Description

Mr Shujahat Aslam, an imam, discusses the Muslim holy month of Ramadan with Dr Jon Hoover, an expert in Islamic Studies; it describes what happens during the time, and what it means to those who celebrate it. Mr Shujahat Aslam, an imam, discusses the Muslim holy month of Ramadan with Dr Jon Hoover, an expert in Islamic Studies; it describes what happens during the time, and what it means to those who celebrate it.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Islam | Islam | calendar | calendar | celebration | celebration | lunar | lunar | fasting | fasting | religion | religion | Muslim | Muslim | sacred | sacred | holy | holy

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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British Muslims

Description

A series of web-pages discussing Muslims in British society.

Subjects

Islam Tabligh-i-Islami Jamaat-i-Islami Muslim Council of Britain Rushdie Satanic Verses

License

Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved

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4.615 The Architecture of Cairo (MIT)

Description

Cairo is the quintessential Islamic city. Founded in 634 at the strategic head of the Nile Delta, the city evolved from an Islamic military outpost to the seat of the ambitious Fatimid caliphate which flourished between the 10th and 12th century. Its most spectacular age, however, was the Mamluk period (1250-1517), when it became the uncontested center of a resurgent Islam and acquired an architectural character that symbolized the image of the Islamic city for centuries to come. Cairo today still shines as a cultural and political center in its three spheres of influence: the Arab world, Africa, and the Islamic world. Moreover, many of its monuments (456 registered by the 1951 Survey of the Islamic Monuments of Cairo) still stand, although they remain largely unknown to the world’s

Subjects

religious architecture | islamic architecture | cairo | urban planning | muslim architecture | egyption architecture | arab architecture | north africa | mediterannean | nile river | Islamic Architecture | Cairo | Muslim Architecture | Cities | Urban Architecture | Urban History

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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Angels and the Cosmos of Faiths

Description

Angels and the Spiritual in Abstract Art: A series of images of paintings by the artist and writer Jyoti Sahi. The series is accompanied by a short essay and explanatory notes on the paintings.

Subjects

Buddhist Hindu Jain Christian Muslim NewAge Yakshas MargaretBaker Temple Josiah Celtic Syrian Pseudo-Dionysius Pseudo-Denys apophatic Nirguna PaulKlee ecology angels Elijah EricLott Jesus Garuda Simurgh PersianSufism JaneWilliams kabala kabbala Revelations mandala SuryaNamashkar yoga Sarah Abraham WalterBenjamin Horeb Rasas aesthetics Edakkal India Kerala Bhutas Nebuchadnezzar Vedic Vedas Agni OwenBarfield C.S.Lewis J.R.RTolkein BillViola TateModern Thankha MaryLewis Satan Lucifer satanic God tribal tribalism Abrahamic Advent Deborah Sinai Kishon MartinBuber Psalms Shiva Ganga Maruths Bhils Bhutas KlausKlostermaier Pre-Raphaelite EdwardBurne-Jones Asuras Devas ShantivanamAshram SatChitAnadaAshram Trinity RaimondoPanikkar BedeGriffiths Trimurthy KurisgumalaAshram primal primalperson StFranc

License

Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved

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Angels and the Cosmos of Faiths

Description

Angels and the Spiritual in Abstract Art A series of images of paintings by the artist and writer Jyoti Sahi. The series is accompanied by a short essay and explanatory notes on the paintings.

Subjects

Buddhist Hindu Jain Christian Muslim NewAge Yakshas MargaretBaker Temple Josiah Celtic Syrian Pseudo-Dionysius Pseudo-Denys apophatic Nirguna PaulKlee ecology angels Elijah EricLott Jesus Garuda Simurgh PersianSufism JaneWilliams kabala kabbala Revelations mandala SuryaNamashkar yoga Sarah Abraham WalterBenjamin Horeb Rasas aesthetics Edakkal India Kerala Bhutas Nebuchadnezzar Vedic Vedas Agni OwenBarfield C.S.Lewis J.R.RTolkein BillViola TateModern Thankha MaryLewis Satan Lucifer satanic God tribal tribalism Abrahamic Advent Deborah Sinai Kishon MartinBuber Psalms Shiva Ganga Maruths Bhils Bhutas KlausKlostermaier Pre-Raphaelite EdwardBurne-Jones Asuras Devas ShantivanamAshram SatChitAnadaAshram Trinity RaimondoPanikkar BedeGriffiths Trimurthy KurisgumalaAshram primal primalperson StFranc

License

Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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21M.289 Islam/Media (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to Islam from the perspective of media and sound studies, intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. From the time of the Prophet Muhammad, Islam in its various manifestations has had a complex relationship with media. While much contemporary writing focuses on Islam in the media, this course explores how many aspects of Islamic practice and thinking might be understood as media technologies that facilitate the inscription, storage and transmission of knowledge. Central questions include: How do Islam and media technologies relate? What kinds of practices of inscription and transmission characterize Islam in all its varieties across time and place? How might Islamic thought and practice be understood in light of databases, networks, and audio

Subjects

Qur'an | hadith | middle east | Muslim | sound | Islamic art | video | jihad | pilgrimage | hajj | protest | women in islam | ISIS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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Gender, Interculturalism and Discourses on Women's Leadership in the Olympic Movement

Description

This paper addresses Western discourses relating to the role of women in the leadership of Olympic and elite sporting bodies in two contrasting non-western contexts, namely in selected Muslim countries (i.e. Member States of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference) and in the People's Republic of China. The two cases are selected because they reflect contrasting contexts in which the role of women is seen to be embedded in very different ideologies, often referred to simplistically as a religious, and a political ideology respectively. The data through which we scrutinise these two cases are derived from two separate studies. The first is an evaluation study of IOC policy Women in Leadership in the Olympic Movement. In 1996 the IOC adopted a set of minimum targets in relation to the pr

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | gender | equality | gender equality | widening participation | female athletes | women in sport | women in leadership | leadership | Muslim women | politics | religion | religious beliefs | western society | women and leadership in the Olympic Movement | women's liberation | Olympic movement | communism | Chinese women | cultural revolution | economic reform.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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Gender, Interculturalism and Discourses on Women's Leadership in the Olympic Movement

Description

This paper addresses Western discourses relating to the role of women in the leadership of Olympic and elite sporting bodies in two contrasting non-western contexts, namely in selected Muslim countries (i.e. Member States of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference) and in the People's Republic of China. The two cases are selected because they reflect contrasting contexts in which the role of women is seen to be embedded in very different ideologies, often referred to simplistically as a religious, and a political ideology respectively. The data through which we scrutinise these two cases are derived from two separate studies. The first is an evaluation study of IOC policy Women in Leadership in the Olympic Movement. In 1996 the IOC adopted a set of minimum targets in relation to the pr

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | gender | equality | gender equality | widening participation | female athletes | women in sport | women in leadership | leadership | Muslim women | politics | religion | religious beliefs | western society | women and leadership in the Olympic Movement | women's liberation | Olympic movement | communism | Chinese women | cultural revolution | economic reform.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

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