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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT) 21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi

Subjects

Popular Culture and Narrative | Popular Culture and Narrative | Literature | Literature | Comics | Comics | Culture | Culture | Literary Fiction | Literary Fiction | Contemporary | Contemporary | Graphic Narratives | Graphic Narratives | broader cultural concerns | broader cultural concerns | contemporary graphic narratives | contemporary graphic narratives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi

Subjects

Popular Culture and Narrative | Literature | Comics | Culture | Literary Fiction | Contemporary | Graphic Narratives | broader cultural concerns | contemporary graphic narratives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT) 21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium. This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Practice | Practice | Non-linear | Non-linear | Interactive | Interactive | Narrative | Narrative | Film | Film | Writing | Writing | Games | Games | Web | Web | HTML | HTML | Multilinear | Multilinear | Story | Story | creative writing | creative writing | computers | computers | book-based narratives | book-based narratives | structure | structure | digression | digression | multiple points of view | multiple points of view | storyline | storyline | hypertexts | hypertexts | adventure games | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | eliza | modeling | modeling | computer-based narratives | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. The books we read have all made significant contributions to their respective sub-fields and have been selected to give as wide a coverage in both field and methodology as possible in one semester's worth of reading. We examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. The books we read have all made significant contributions to their respective sub-fields and have been selected to give as wide a coverage in both field and methodology as possible in one semester's worth of reading. We examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches.

Subjects

History | History | Historical | Historical | Methods | Methods | Sources | Sources | Narrative | Narrative | Analytic | Analytic | writing methods | writing methods | historians | historians | annales | annales | gender | gender | middle ages | middle ages | fantasy | fantasy | environment | environment | demography | demography | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.209 Philosophy In Film and Other Media (MIT) 24.209 Philosophy In Film and Other Media (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines works of film in relation to thematic issues of philosophical importance that also occur in other arts, particularly literature and opera. Emphasis is put on film's ability to represent and express feeling as well as cognition. Both written and cinematic works by Sturges, Shaw, Cocteau, Hitchcock, Joyce, and Bergman, among others, are considered. There are no tests or quizzes, however students write two major papers on media/philosophical research topics of their choosing. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines works of film in relation to thematic issues of philosophical importance that also occur in other arts, particularly literature and opera. Emphasis is put on film's ability to represent and express feeling as well as cognition. Both written and cinematic works by Sturges, Shaw, Cocteau, Hitchcock, Joyce, and Bergman, among others, are considered. There are no tests or quizzes, however students write two major papers on media/philosophical research topics of their choosing.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Narrative | Narrative | Linguistics | Linguistics | Literature | Literature | Opera | Opera | Feeling | Feeling | Cognition | Cognition | Arts | Arts | Thematic | Thematic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | English literature | Novel | Novel | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Twentieth | Modernity | Modernity | Narrative | Narrative | Social criticism | Social criticism | Realism | Realism | Romance | Romance | Romantic | Romantic | Subjectivity | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | George Eliot | James Joyce | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT) 21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define 'non-linearity/multi-linearity', 'interactivity', 'narrative'. To what extend are these aspect This course explores the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define 'non-linearity/multi-linearity', 'interactivity', 'narrative'. To what extend are these aspect

Subjects

Narrative | Narrative | Interactive | Interactive | Non-Linear | Non-Linear | Multi-Linear | Multi-Linear | Digital | Digital | Print | Print | Media | Media | Talmud | Talmud | Novel | Novel | Literature | Literature | Film | Film | Games | Games | Storyline | Storyline | Text | Text | Story | Story | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489 | CMS.845 | CMS.845

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT) 21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium. This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Practice | Practice | Non-linear | Non-linear | Interactive | Interactive | Narrative | Narrative | Film | Film | Writing | Writing | Games | Games | Web | Web | HTML | HTML | Multilinear | Multilinear | Story | Story | creative writing | creative writing | computers | computers | book-based narratives | book-based narratives | structure | structure | digression | digression | multiple points of view | multiple points of view | storyline | storyline | hypertexts | hypertexts | adventure games | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | eliza | modeling | modeling | computer-based narratives | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define 'non-linearity/multi-linearity', 'interactivity', 'narrative'. To what extend are these aspect

Subjects

Narrative | Interactive | Non-Linear | Multi-Linear | Digital | Print | Media | Talmud | Novel | Literature | Film | Games | Storyline | Text | Story | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | CMS.845

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Practice | Non-linear | Interactive | Narrative | Film | Writing | Games | Web | HTML | Multilinear | Story | creative writing | computers | book-based narratives | structure | digression | multiple points of view | storyline | hypertexts | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | modeling | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. The books we read have all made significant contributions to their respective sub-fields and have been selected to give as wide a coverage in both field and methodology as possible in one semester's worth of reading. We examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches.

Subjects

History | Historical | Methods | Sources | Narrative | Analytic | writing methods | historians | annales | gender | middle ages | fantasy | environment | demography | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define 'non-linearity/multi-linearity', 'interactivity', 'narrative'. To what extend are these aspect

Subjects

Narrative | Interactive | Non-Linear | Multi-Linear | Digital | Print | Media | Talmud | Novel | Literature | Film | Games | Storyline | Text | Story | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | CMS.845

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Practice | Non-linear | Interactive | Narrative | Film | Writing | Games | Web | HTML | Multilinear | Story | creative writing | computers | book-based narratives | structure | digression | multiple points of view | storyline | hypertexts | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | modeling | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | Novel | 18th century | 19th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Modernity | Narrative | Social criticism | Realism | Romance | Romantic | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.209 Philosophy In Film and Other Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines works of film in relation to thematic issues of philosophical importance that also occur in other arts, particularly literature and opera. Emphasis is put on film's ability to represent and express feeling as well as cognition. Both written and cinematic works by Sturges, Shaw, Cocteau, Hitchcock, Joyce, and Bergman, among others, are considered. There are no tests or quizzes, however students write two major papers on media/philosophical research topics of their choosing.

Subjects

Philosophy | Film | Cinema | Narrative | Linguistics | Literature | Opera | Feeling | Cognition | Arts | Thematic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | Novel | 18th century | 19th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Modernity | Narrative | Social criticism | Realism | Romance | Romantic | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Practice | Non-linear | Interactive | Narrative | Film | Writing | Games | Web | HTML | Multilinear | Story | creative writing | computers | book-based narratives | structure | digression | multiple points of view | storyline | hypertexts | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | modeling | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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