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21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT) 21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | 21G.022 | WGS.141 | WGS.141 | Women | Women | International | International | Global | Global | Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Writers | Writers | Asia | Asia | Africa | Africa | Middle east | Middle east | Latin america | Latin america | North america | North america | Non-western | Non-western | Gender roles | Gender roles | Culture | Culture | Heritage | Heritage | Female | Female | History | History | Colonialism | Colonialism | Religion | Religion | Nationalism | Nationalism | Socialization | Socialization | Language | Language | Patriarchal | Patriarchal | Sex | Sex | Marriage | Marriage | Politics | Politics | Love | Love | Work | Work | Identity | Identity | Fiction | Fiction | literature | literature | SP.461J | SP.461J | WMN.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | SP.461 | WMN.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT) 21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities. This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities.

Subjects

Middle East | Middle East | history | history | Ottoman period | Ottoman period | imperialism | imperialism | nation-state | nation-state | Turkey | Turkey | Egypt | Egypt | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Islam | Islam | Iranian Revolution | Iranian Revolution | democracy | democracy | Orientalism | Orientalism | Western Imperialism | Western Imperialism | World War I | World War I | Great War | Great War | Nationalism | Nationalism | Israel | Israel | Palestine | Palestine | Islamic radicalism | Islamic radicalism | Hamas | Hamas | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Isis | Isis | Iraq | Iraq | Yezidis | Yezidis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT) 21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | 21G.022 | WGS.141 | WGS.141 | Women | Women | International | International | Global | Global | Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Writers | Writers | Asia | Asia | Africa | Africa | Middle east | Middle east | Latin america | Latin america | North america | North america | Non-western | Non-western | Gender roles | Gender roles | Culture | Culture | Heritage | Heritage | Female | Female | History | History | Colonialism | Colonialism | Religion | Religion | Nationalism | Nationalism | Socialization | Socialization | Language | Language | Patriarchal | Patriarchal | Sex | Sex | Marriage | Marriage | Politics | Politics | Love | Love | Work | Work | Identity | Identity | Fiction | Fiction | literature | literature | SP.461J | SP.461J | WMN.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | SP.461 | WMN.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Literature | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | 15th | Culture | Society | Women | History | Roman empire | Religion | Literacy | Chivalry | Scholasticism | University | Education | Heretics | Nationalism | Class | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

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21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | WGS.141 | Women | International | Global | Contemporary literature | Writers | Asia | Africa | Middle east | Latin america | North america | Non-western | Gender roles | Culture | Heritage | Female | History | Colonialism | Religion | Nationalism | Socialization | Language | Patriarchal | Sex | Marriage | Politics | Love | Work | Identity | Fiction | literature | SP.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Literature | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | 15th | Culture | Society | Women | History | Roman empire | Religion | Literacy | Chivalry | Scholasticism | University | Education | Heretics | Nationalism | Class | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Literature | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | 15th | Culture | Society | Women | History | Roman empire | Religion | Literacy | Chivalry | Scholasticism | University | Education | Heretics | Nationalism | Class | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities.

Subjects

Middle East | history | Ottoman period | imperialism | nation-state | Turkey | Egypt | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Islam | Iranian Revolution | democracy | Orientalism | Western Imperialism | World War I | Great War | Nationalism | Israel | Palestine | Islamic radicalism | Hamas | Arab Spring | Isis | Iraq | Yezidis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

Women | International | Global | Contemporary literature | Writers | Asia | Africa | Middle east | Latin america | North america | Non-western | Gender roles | Culture | Heritage | Female | History | Colonialism | Religion | Nationalism | Socialization | Language | Patriarchal | Sex | Marriage | Politics | Love | Work | Identity | Fiction | literature | WMN.461J | 21F.022 | SP.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | WGS.141 | Women | International | Global | Contemporary literature | Writers | Asia | Africa | Middle east | Latin america | North america | Non-western | Gender roles | Culture | Heritage | Female | History | Colonialism | Religion | Nationalism | Socialization | Language | Patriarchal | Sex | Marriage | Politics | Love | Work | Identity | Fiction | literature | SP.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

Women | International | Global | Contemporary literature | Writers | Asia | Africa | Middle east | Latin america | North america | Non-western | Gender roles | Culture | Heritage | Female | History | Colonialism | Religion | Nationalism | Socialization | Language | Patriarchal | Sex | Marriage | Politics | Love | Work | Identity | Fiction | literature | SP.461J | WMN.461J | 21F.022 | SP.461 | WMN.461

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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