Searching for People : 71 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3

The law-making process in England and Wales The law-making process in England and Wales

Description

This free course, The law-making process in England and Wales, introduces you to the sources of law in England and Wales. It examines the democratic law-making process and how and by whom proposed legislation is initiated, before introducing you to the Westminster Parliament, which creates legislation. It is within this Parliament that proposed legislation is considered and becomes law. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, The law-making process in England and Wales, introduces you to the sources of law in England and Wales. It examines the democratic law-making process and how and by whom proposed legislation is initiated, before introducing you to the Westminster Parliament, which creates legislation. It is within this Parliament that proposed legislation is considered and becomes law. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | The Law | The Law | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | W101_1 | W101_1 | legislative process | legislative process | Westminster | Westminster | parliament | parliament | devolution | devolution | democracy | democracy | law | law

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Modern slavery Modern slavery

Description

This free course, Modern slavery, is designed to develop an understanding of the international system of human rights protection in relation to modern slavery, but also encourage an appreciation of the influence of International Human Rights Law on the development of the domestic system of human rights protection. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Modern slavery, is designed to develop an understanding of the international system of human rights protection in relation to modern slavery, but also encourage an appreciation of the influence of International Human Rights Law on the development of the domestic system of human rights protection. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

The Law | The Law | People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | W102_1 | W102_1 | international law | international law | human rights | human rights | slavery | slavery | modern slavery | modern slavery | trafficking in human beings | trafficking in human beings | forced labour | forced labour

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Partnerships and networks in work with young people Partnerships and networks in work with young people

Description

The term 'partnership' is used to describe a wide range of organisational arrangements and ways of working: from informal networking between individuals, to more formal partnership structures. In this free course, Partnerships and networks in work with young people, you will explore a range of meanings for the word 'partnership' and see that it is used to describe a range of practices, structures and processes. You will also look at some of the difficulties, as well as the potential benefits, that can come from working in partnership. First published on Tue, 16 Feb 2016 as Partnerships and networks in work with young people. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The term 'partnership' is used to describe a wide range of organisational arrangements and ways of working: from informal networking between individuals, to more formal partnership structures. In this free course, Partnerships and networks in work with young people, you will explore a range of meanings for the word 'partnership' and see that it is used to describe a range of practices, structures and processes. You will also look at some of the difficulties, as well as the potential benefits, that can come from working in partnership. First published on Tue, 16 Feb 2016 as Partnerships and networks in work with young people. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Health | Sports & Psychology | Health | Sports & Psychology | Childhood & Youth | Childhood & Youth | Children and Young People | Children and Young People | Education | Education | E218_1 | E218_1 | partnerships | partnerships | network | network | working in partnership | working in partnership

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Working together for children: Stirling Working together for children: Stirling

Description

The care of children, especially those with disabilities, is surrounded by complex issues. Learning to navigate these difficulties while helping children to lead a happy and fulfilling life is the focus of this free course, Working together for children: Stirling. Video footage from the Plus organisation in Stirling, Scotland, will help you develop a skilled, dynamic and ethical approach to working with children. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Working together for children: Stirling. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The care of children, especially those with disabilities, is surrounded by complex issues. Learning to navigate these difficulties while helping children to lead a happy and fulfilling life is the focus of this free course, Working together for children: Stirling. Video footage from the Plus organisation in Stirling, Scotland, will help you develop a skilled, dynamic and ethical approach to working with children. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Working together for children: Stirling. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Children and Young People | Children and Young People | Scotland | Scotland | children | children | disability | disability

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Race, ethnicity and crime Race, ethnicity and crime

Description

This free course, Race, ethnicity and crime, briefly examines the relationships between race and ethnicity, and crime, criminalisation and criminal justice. It considers the relationship between crime and cultural difference; the notion of 'criminalisation' and how its processes affect individuals and their opportunities; and the lived consequences of racialisation. Specifically, you will examine the ways in which these criminalisations which lead to the over-policing, over-incarceration and under-protection of particular populations lie at the heart of critical criminological arguments. First published on Fri, 04 Mar 2016 as Race, ethnicity and crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Race, ethnicity and crime, briefly examines the relationships between race and ethnicity, and crime, criminalisation and criminal justice. It considers the relationship between crime and cultural difference; the notion of 'criminalisation' and how its processes affect individuals and their opportunities; and the lived consequences of racialisation. Specifically, you will examine the ways in which these criminalisations which lead to the over-policing, over-incarceration and under-protection of particular populations lie at the heart of critical criminological arguments. First published on Fri, 04 Mar 2016 as Race, ethnicity and crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | racialization | racialization | criminalisation | criminalisation | D867_2 | D867_2

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introduction to critical criminology Introduction to critical criminology

Description

This free course, Introduction to critical criminology, provides a brief introduction to critical criminological thinking. It defines the ways in which critical criminologists take a 'critical stance' on the fundamental concepts, practices and institutions associated with crime and criminal justice systems. First published on Wed, 24 Feb 2016 as Introduction to critical criminology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Introduction to critical criminology, provides a brief introduction to critical criminological thinking. It defines the ways in which critical criminologists take a 'critical stance' on the fundamental concepts, practices and institutions associated with crime and criminal justice systems. First published on Wed, 24 Feb 2016 as Introduction to critical criminology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | D867_1 | D867_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Children and violence: An introductory, international and interdisciplinary approach Children and violence: An introductory, international and interdisciplinary approach

Description

Children are subject to many forms of adversity, for example, poverty or ill health. However, a significant form of adversity experienced by children in many different regions of the world is violence. The form of violence against children varies widely and is hugely disparate. In this unit, the focus is on three different environments where children experience violence: at home, among peers at school and in the wider society (in the context of armed conflicts). The text considers the experiences of children both locally and globally. For this reason, violence against children should not be considered a phenomenon that is remote. Sadly, children may experience violence in their families and among their peers, and may also become involved in armed conflict. The unit considers in detail the Children are subject to many forms of adversity, for example, poverty or ill health. However, a significant form of adversity experienced by children in many different regions of the world is violence. The form of violence against children varies widely and is hugely disparate. In this unit, the focus is on three different environments where children experience violence: at home, among peers at school and in the wider society (in the context of armed conflicts). The text considers the experiences of children both locally and globally. For this reason, violence against children should not be considered a phenomenon that is remote. Sadly, children may experience violence in their families and among their peers, and may also become involved in armed conflict. The unit considers in detail the

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | children | children | violence | violence | school | school | families | families | bullying | bullying

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introducing ageing Introducing ageing

Description

Everyone is ageing, whatever their current age, and we live in a world where many people are living much longer than previous generations. This is often seen as a problem. But is it? This free course, Introducing ageing, will help you to think about this issue by introducing you to some key ideas in studying later life. First published on Tue, 08 Mar 2016 as Introducing ageing. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Everyone is ageing, whatever their current age, and we live in a world where many people are living much longer than previous generations. This is often seen as a problem. But is it? This free course, Introducing ageing, will help you to think about this issue by introducing you to some key ideas in studying later life. First published on Tue, 08 Mar 2016 as Introducing ageing. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Health | Sports & Psychology | Health | Sports & Psychology | Health | Health | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | K118_1 | K118_1 | ageing | ageing | ageism | ageism | older people | older people | later life | later life | gerontology | gerontology | third age | third age | social change | social change

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Changing law: mental capacity legislation Changing law: mental capacity legislation

Description

The aim of this free course, Changing law: mental capacity legislation, is to consider how legal problems are identified and how the law develops to address those problems. It uses the evolution of legislation on decision making for mentally incapacitated adults to explore how development of the law is achieved. Through this study of the background to, and history of, the passage of legislation relating to mental capacity, legal meaning is discussed and explored. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The aim of this free course, Changing law: mental capacity legislation, is to consider how legal problems are identified and how the law develops to address those problems. It uses the evolution of legislation on decision making for mentally incapacitated adults to explore how development of the law is achieved. Through this study of the background to, and history of, the passage of legislation relating to mental capacity, legal meaning is discussed and explored. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Changing law: mental capacity legislation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | The Law | The Law | W820_1 | W820_1 | law | law | legal problems | legal problems | evolution of legislation | evolution of legislation | mentally incapacitated adults | mentally incapacitated adults | development of law | development of law | legal meaning | legal meaning

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introduction to child psychology Introduction to child psychology

Description

Childhood is a time of rapid growth and development, and studying these changes is endlessly stimulating. In this free course, Introduction to child psychology, you will be introduced to the discipline of child psychology and some of the key questions that guide the understanding of childhood. These questions include 'What influences children's development?' and 'How do psychologists study the physical and cognitive changes that occur during childhood?' As you work through this material, you will also gain a deeper understanding concerning how psychologists work with young children across a range of applied settings through activities and audio-visual materials. First published on Fri, 26 Feb 2016 as Introduction to child psychology. To find out more visit The Open University's Open Childhood is a time of rapid growth and development, and studying these changes is endlessly stimulating. In this free course, Introduction to child psychology, you will be introduced to the discipline of child psychology and some of the key questions that guide the understanding of childhood. These questions include 'What influences children's development?' and 'How do psychologists study the physical and cognitive changes that occur during childhood?' As you work through this material, you will also gain a deeper understanding concerning how psychologists work with young children across a range of applied settings through activities and audio-visual materials. First published on Fri, 26 Feb 2016 as Introduction to child psychology. To find out more visit The Open University's Open

Subjects

Childhood & Youth | Childhood & Youth | Children and Young People | Children and Young People | E102_1 | E102_1 | child studies | child studies | child psychology | child psychology | childhood | childhood | youth | youth

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Issues in research with children and young people Issues in research with children and young people

Description

This free course, Issues in research with children and young people, considers the aims and range of research with children and young people. Students consider how their own views and understandings about childhood and youth have arisen. Different definitions of research are explored through first-hand accounts by researchers across a range of disciplines and studies, from the small-scale to international studies studying children's lives across several countries. Attention is drawn to the role of both researchers and participants, raising issues about how children and young people can be directly involved in the research process. First published on Wed, 17 Feb 2016 as Issues in research with children and young people. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Crea This free course, Issues in research with children and young people, considers the aims and range of research with children and young people. Students consider how their own views and understandings about childhood and youth have arisen. Different definitions of research are explored through first-hand accounts by researchers across a range of disciplines and studies, from the small-scale to international studies studying children's lives across several countries. Attention is drawn to the role of both researchers and participants, raising issues about how children and young people can be directly involved in the research process. First published on Wed, 17 Feb 2016 as Issues in research with children and young people. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Crea

Subjects

Childhood & Youth | Childhood & Youth | Children and Young People | Children and Young People | EK313_1 | EK313_1 | children | children | research | research | youth | youth | childhood | childhood | methods | methods | young lives | young lives

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view

Description

This free course, Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view, looks at how Keynes's theories revolutionised thinking about the causes of crises and unemployment. Keynes's thinking on how to reduce these problems was very influential with economists and policy makers for several decades following the 1930s. The economic downturn that started in 2008 led to a widespread revival of interest as economic conditions seemed to resemble those seen in the 1930s. This OpenLearn course on Keynes's ideas is therefore highly relevant to modern policy making, as well as being of historical interest. First published on Mon, 08 Jun 2015 as Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 This free course, Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view, looks at how Keynes's theories revolutionised thinking about the causes of crises and unemployment. Keynes's thinking on how to reduce these problems was very influential with economists and policy makers for several decades following the 1930s. The economic downturn that started in 2008 led to a widespread revival of interest as economic conditions seemed to resemble those seen in the 1930s. This OpenLearn course on Keynes's ideas is therefore highly relevant to modern policy making, as well as being of historical interest. First published on Mon, 08 Jun 2015 as Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 First published on Mon, 08 Jun 2015 as Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 First published on Mon, 08 Jun 2015 as Economics and the 2008 crisis: a Keynesian view. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | DD209_1 | DD209_1 | economics | economics | policy analysis | policy analysis | 2008 crisis | 2008 crisis | Keynes | Keynes | economic modelling | economic modelling

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

What is politics? What is politics?

Description

This free course, What is politics?, introduces you to the world of politics. It is dedicated primarily to answering the question of what politics is. Although the question might seem rather simple, it elicits various, often contradictory responses. As you will realise, in politics as in much of the humanities and social sciences definitive answers are difficult to come by. What politics is and equally, who does it, and where it is done are hotly debated and highly contested. This OpenLearn course will introduce you to some of these debates, and their implications for the study and practice of politics. First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 This free course, What is politics?, introduces you to the world of politics. It is dedicated primarily to answering the question of what politics is. Although the question might seem rather simple, it elicits various, often contradictory responses. As you will realise, in politics as in much of the humanities and social sciences definitive answers are difficult to come by. What politics is and equally, who does it, and where it is done are hotly debated and highly contested. This OpenLearn course will introduce you to some of these debates, and their implications for the study and practice of politics. First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015

Subjects

Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Politics | DD211_1 | DD211_1 | politics | politics | political theory | political theory | government | government

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT) 17.547 Government and Politics of China (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes contemporary Chinese politics, both pre-Communist and Communist. It focuses on the process of modernization and political development of Chinese civilization. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject at greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

People's Republic of China | People's Republic of China | quest for modernity | quest for modernity | modernization | modernization | relationship between citizen and state | relationship between citizen and state | PRC | PRC | PRC politics | PRC politics | China's political system | China's political system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Poverty in Scotland Poverty in Scotland

Description

The facts and figures on poverty often dont provide a meaningful picture of the situation. This free course, Poverty in Scotland, demonstrates the true impact of poverty on the people and places in Scotland through a series of essays that combine the statistics with stories of people who work in the field and those who live in poverty. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Poverty in Scotland. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The facts and figures on poverty often dont provide a meaningful picture of the situation. This free course, Poverty in Scotland, demonstrates the true impact of poverty on the people and places in Scotland through a series of essays that combine the statistics with stories of people who work in the field and those who live in poverty. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Poverty in Scotland. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | Scotland | Scotland | poverty | poverty

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Young people’s wellbeing Young people’s wellbeing

Description

What do we mean by 'wellbeing' for young people? How is it shaped by social differences and inequalities, and how can we improve young people's mental and physical health? This free course, Young people's wellbeing, will examine the range of factors affecting young people's wellbeing, such as obesity, binge drinking, depression and behavioural problems. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Young people’s wellbeing. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 What do we mean by 'wellbeing' for young people? How is it shaped by social differences and inequalities, and how can we improve young people's mental and physical health? This free course, Young people's wellbeing, will examine the range of factors affecting young people's wellbeing, such as obesity, binge drinking, depression and behavioural problems. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Young people’s wellbeing. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Children and Young People | Children and Young People | International Development | International Development | mental health | mental health | KE308_1 | KE308_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Finding information in Society Finding information in Society

Description

This free course, Finding information in Society, will help you to identify and use information in Society, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of organising your own information, and learn how to reference it properly in your work. Finally, discover how to keep up to date with the latest developments in your area of interest by using tools such as RSS and mailing lists. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Finding info This free course, Finding information in Society, will help you to identify and use information in Society, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of organising your own information, and learn how to reference it properly in your work. Finally, discover how to keep up to date with the latest developments in your area of interest by using tools such as RSS and mailing lists. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Finding info

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | references | references | information | information

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Criminology beyond crime Criminology beyond crime

Description

This unit examines the notion of 'social harm' as an alternative to the legal definition of 'crime'. To illustrate this concept, the unit considers developments in Green Criminology, which have sought to examine the problems of global environmental harm and the myriad interactions between human beings and the natural environment. First published on Thu, 23 Jan 2014 as Criminology beyond crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 This unit examines the notion of 'social harm' as an alternative to the legal definition of 'crime'. To illustrate this concept, the unit considers developments in Green Criminology, which have sought to examine the problems of global environmental harm and the myriad interactions between human beings and the natural environment. First published on Thu, 23 Jan 2014 as Criminology beyond crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | D867_4 | D867_4

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Crimes of the powerful Crimes of the powerful

Description

This unit examines the complexities of – and barriers to – setting new criminological research agendas by considering the difficulties associated with conducting research on crimes of the powerful. First published on Thu, 23 Jan 2014 as Crimes of the powerful. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 This unit examines the complexities of – and barriers to – setting new criminological research agendas by considering the difficulties associated with conducting research on crimes of the powerful. First published on Thu, 23 Jan 2014 as Crimes of the powerful. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | ideology | ideology | D867_3 | D867_3

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Race, ethnicity and crime Race, ethnicity and crime

Description

This unit briefly examines the relationships between race and ethnicity, and crime, criminalisation and criminal justice. It considers the relationship between crime and cultural difference; the notion of ‘criminalisation’ and how its processes affect individuals and their opportunities; and the lived consequences of racialisation. Specifically, you will examine the ways these criminalisations – which lead to the over-policing, over-incarceration and under-protection of particular populations – lie at the heart of critical criminological arguments. First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Race, ethnicity and crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 This unit briefly examines the relationships between race and ethnicity, and crime, criminalisation and criminal justice. It considers the relationship between crime and cultural difference; the notion of ‘criminalisation’ and how its processes affect individuals and their opportunities; and the lived consequences of racialisation. Specifically, you will examine the ways these criminalisations – which lead to the over-policing, over-incarceration and under-protection of particular populations – lie at the heart of critical criminological arguments. First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Race, ethnicity and crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Race, ethnicity and crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Race, ethnicity and crime. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | racialization | racialization | criminalisation | criminalisation | D867_2 | D867_2

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introduction to critical criminology Introduction to critical criminology

Description

This unit provides a brief introduction to critical criminological thinking. It defines the ways in which critical criminologists take a 'critical stance' to the fundamental concepts, practices and institutions associated with crime and criminal justice systems. First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Introduction to critical criminology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 This unit provides a brief introduction to critical criminological thinking. It defines the ways in which critical criminologists take a 'critical stance' to the fundamental concepts, practices and institutions associated with crime and criminal justice systems. First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Introduction to critical criminology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Introduction to critical criminology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 First published on Wed, 22 Jan 2014 as Introduction to critical criminology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | D867_1 | D867_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT) 17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT)

Description

This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory. This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People’s Republic of China. China’s foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China’s foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China’s behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory.

Subjects

China | China | chinese | chinese | foreign | foreign | policy | policy | international relations | international relations | People?s Republic of China | People?s Republic of China | foreign relations | foreign relations | Cold War | Cold War | contemporary | contemporary | diplomatic | diplomatic | security | security | economic | economic | 1949 | 1949 | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | behavior | behavior | competing explanations | competing explanations | key events | key events | political science | political science | history | history | international relations theory | international relations theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introduction to law in Wales Introduction to law in Wales

Description

This free course, Introduction to law in Wales, gives a brief overview of the legal history in Wales from the 12th century, followed by an overview of devolution and referendums, the law making powers of the Welsh Assembly and the possible future for legal Wales. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Introduction to law in Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Introduction to law in Wales, gives a brief overview of the legal history in Wales from the 12th century, followed by an overview of devolution and referendums, the law making powers of the Welsh Assembly and the possible future for legal Wales. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Introduction to law in Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

History & The Arts | History & The Arts | People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | Welsh Assembly | Welsh Assembly | National Assembly | National Assembly | Government of Wales Act | Government of Wales Act | Cyfraith Hywel Dda | Cyfraith Hywel Dda | law in Wales | law in Wales | A Voice for Wales | A Voice for Wales | the Richards Commission | the Richards Commission | Welsh devolution | Welsh devolution | LLM_1 | LLM_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Finding information in Society Finding information in Society

Description

This unit will help you to identify and use information in Society, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of organising your own information, and learn how to reference it properly in your work. Finally, discover how to keep up to date with the latest developments in your area of interest by using tools such as RSS and mailing lists. First published on Tue, 26 Nov 2013 as Finding information in Society. To find out more vis This unit will help you to identify and use information in Society, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of organising your own information, and learn how to reference it properly in your work. Finally, discover how to keep up to date with the latest developments in your area of interest by using tools such as RSS and mailing lists. First published on Tue, 26 Nov 2013 as Finding information in Society. To find out more vis

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | references | references | information | information

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Social science and participation Social science and participation

Description

This free course, Social science and participation, looks at how social science investigates participation, and uses this topic to look in particular at how social science helps to enact social worlds. As you work through the course, you will see that social science enactment of participation is closely related to social science descriptions of, for example, voting or other citizenly practices, and related also to social science understandings of, for example, just how to define and evaluate poverty. First published on Thu, 03 Mar 2016 as Social science and participation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Social science and participation, looks at how social science investigates participation, and uses this topic to look in particular at how social science helps to enact social worlds. As you work through the course, you will see that social science enactment of participation is closely related to social science descriptions of, for example, voting or other citizenly practices, and related also to social science understandings of, for example, just how to define and evaluate poverty. First published on Thu, 03 Mar 2016 as Social science and participation. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | social sciences | social sciences | participation | participation | using social science | using social science | poverty | poverty | DD206_1 | DD206_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata