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17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors.

Subjects

liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | 17.100 | 17.100 | 14.781 | 14.781 | 15.678 | 15.678 | Political science | Political science | theories | theories

License

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17.582 Civil War (MIT) 17.582 Civil War (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. It studies the origins of civil war, discusses variables affecting duration, and examines termination of conflict. This subject is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases, although with concentration on various Balkan civil wars. This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. It studies the origins of civil war, discusses variables affecting duration, and examines termination of conflict. This subject is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases, although with concentration on various Balkan civil wars.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social science | social science | civil war | civil war | origins | origins | duration | duration | termination | termination | conflict | conflict | Balkan | Balkan | World Bank | World Bank | Identity | Identity | fear | fear | greed | greed | death | death | intervention | intervention | peace | peace | Columbia | Columbia | Sudan | Sudan | Iraq | Iraq | El Salvador | El Salvador | South Africa | South Africa

License

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17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT) 17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT)

Description

A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation

Subjects

Political science | Political science | military | military | modern | modern | operations | operations | material | material | war | war | weapon | weapon | sensor | sensor | communication | communication | information processing | information processing | technologies | technologies | human | human | organizational | organizational | doctrine | doctrine | future | future | battlefields | battlefields | organizational hierarchy | organizational hierarchy | branches. | branches. | branches | branches

License

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

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17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT) 17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT)

Description

Innovations have frequently determined the course of wars. This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations. Innovations have frequently determined the course of wars. This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | Innovation | Innovation | military organizations | military organizations | war | war | history | history | cases | cases | organization theory | organization theory | empirical study | empirical study | land warfare | land warfare | battleships | battleships | airpower | airpower | submarine | submarine | missiles | missiles | armor; military affairs. | armor; military affairs. | armor | armor | military affairs | military affairs

License

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17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT) 17.871 Political Science Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects. This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | quantitative tools | quantitative tools | research | research | statistics | statistics | social science | social science | empirical questions | empirical questions | STATA | STATA

License

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17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT) 17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT)

Description

What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more. What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | affirmative action | affirmative action | religion | religion | sexuality | sexuality | evolution | evolution | creationism | creationism | prostitution | prostitution | beauty | beauty | meaning of life | meaning of life | health care | health care | euthanasia | euthanasia | gender | gender | race | race

License

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

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17.950 Understanding Military Operations (MIT) 17.950 Understanding Military Operations (MIT)

Description

A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, and the human or organizational side of war. This seminar will break apart selected past, current, and future sea, air, space, and land battlefields into their constituent parts and look at the interaction in each of those warfare areas between existing military doctrine and weapons, sensors, communications, and information processing technologies. It will specifically seek to explore how technological development, whether innovative or stagnant, is influenced in each warfare area by military doctrine. A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, and the human or organizational side of war. This seminar will break apart selected past, current, and future sea, air, space, and land battlefields into their constituent parts and look at the interaction in each of those warfare areas between existing military doctrine and weapons, sensors, communications, and information processing technologies. It will specifically seek to explore how technological development, whether innovative or stagnant, is influenced in each warfare area by military doctrine.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | military | military | modern | modern | operations | operations | material | material | war | war | weapon | weapon | sensor | sensor | communication | communication | information processing | information processing | technologies | technologies | human | human | organizational | organizational | doctrine | doctrine | future | future | battlefields | battlefields | organizational hierarchy | organizational hierarchy | branches | branches

License

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17.582 Civil War (MIT) 17.582 Civil War (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases. This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social science | social science | civil war | civil war | origins | origins | duration | duration | termination | termination | conflict | conflict | World Bank | World Bank | Identity | Identity | fear | fear | greed | greed | death | death | intervention | intervention | peace | peace

License

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17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT) 17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT)

Description

This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations. This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subjects

URIECA | URIECA | laboratory | laboratory | kinase | kinase | cancer cells | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | DNA | DNA | cultures | cultures | UV-Vis | UV-Vis | agarose gel | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | affinity tags | lyse | lyse | digest | digest | mutants | mutants | resistance | resistance | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | recombinant | nickel affinity | nickel affinity | inhibitors | inhibitors | biochemistry | biochemistry | kinetics | kinetics | enzyme | enzyme | inhibition | inhibition | purification | purification | expression | expression | Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | innovation | innovation | military organizations | military organizations | war | war | history | history | organization theory | organization theory | empirical study | empirical study | land warfare | land warfare | battleships | battleships | airpower | airpower | submarines | submarines | cruise | cruise | ballistic | ballistic | missiles | missiles | armor | armor | military affairs | military affairs | strategic | strategic | tactical | tactical | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | Vietnam | Vietnam | Revolution in Military Affairs | Revolution in Military Affairs | RMA | RMA

License

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17.918 New Global Agenda: Exploring 21st Century Challenges through Innovations in Information Technologies (MIT) 17.918 New Global Agenda: Exploring 21st Century Challenges through Innovations in Information Technologies (MIT)

Description

This workshop is designed to introduce students to different perspectives on international politics in the 21st century. Students will explore how advances in information technology are changing international relations and global governance through opening new channels of communication, creating new methods of education, and new potentials for democratization. We will consider the positive and negative externalities associated with applications of such technologies. Students will be encouraged to look at alternative futures, and/or to frame solutions to problems that they define. The class will include guest lectures, discussions, and a final project and presentation. This workshop is designed to introduce students to different perspectives on international politics in the 21st century. Students will explore how advances in information technology are changing international relations and global governance through opening new channels of communication, creating new methods of education, and new potentials for democratization. We will consider the positive and negative externalities associated with applications of such technologies. Students will be encouraged to look at alternative futures, and/or to frame solutions to problems that they define. The class will include guest lectures, discussions, and a final project and presentation.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | global | global | Twenty-first Century | Twenty-first Century | innovation | innovation | challenges | challenges | information technology | information technology | workshop | workshop | international politics | international politics | international relations | international relations | global governance | global governance | communication | communication | education | education | democratization | democratization | alternative futures | alternative futures | solutions | solutions

License

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

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17.199J Working in a Global Economy (MIT) 17.199J Working in a Global Economy (MIT)

Description

The course introduces the main debates about the "new" global economy and their implications for practice and policy. Experts from academia and business will share their findings about, and direct experiences with, different aspects of globalization. The course introduces the main debates about the "new" global economy and their implications for practice and policy. Experts from academia and business will share their findings about, and direct experiences with, different aspects of globalization.

Subjects

17.199 | 17.199 | 21G.098 | 21G.098 | Political science | Political science | working | working | global economy | global economy | practice | practice | policy | policy | experts | experts | academia | academia | business | business

License

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17.148 Political Economy of Globalization (MIT) 17.148 Political Economy of Globalization (MIT)

Description

This is a graduate seminar for students who already have some familiarity with issues in political economy and/or European politics. The objective is to examine the ways in which changes in the international economy and the regimes that regulate it interact with domestic politics, policy-making, and the institutional structures of the political economy in industrialized democracies. This is a graduate seminar for students who already have some familiarity with issues in political economy and/or European politics. The objective is to examine the ways in which changes in the international economy and the regimes that regulate it interact with domestic politics, policy-making, and the institutional structures of the political economy in industrialized democracies.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economy | economy | globalization | globalization | europe | europe | politics | politics | international | international | industrialized countries | industrialized countries | deomocracy | deomocracy | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | policy | policy | state | state | society | society

License

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT) 17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT)

Description

This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform. This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | natioanl security | natioanl security | origins | origins | structure | structure | functions | functions | U.S. | U.S. | Intelligence | Intelligence | Community | Community | national security policy | national security policy | intelligence agencies | intelligence agencies | collection | collection | analysis | analysis | counterintelligence | counterintelligence | covert action | covert action | strategic warning | strategic warning | counterterrorism | counterterrorism | counterproliferation | counterproliferation | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | controversies | controversies | policymakers | policymakers | congressional oversight | congressional oversight | reform | reform

License

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17.261 Congress and the American Political System II (MIT) 17.261 Congress and the American Political System II (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes the development of the United States Congress by focusing on the competing theoretical lenses through which legislatures have been studied. In particular, it compares sociological and economic models of legislative behavior, applying those models to floor decision-making, committee behavior, political parties, relations with other branches of the Federal government, and elections. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes the development of the United States Congress by focusing on the competing theoretical lenses through which legislatures have been studied. In particular, it compares sociological and economic models of legislative behavior, applying those models to floor decision-making, committee behavior, political parties, relations with other branches of the Federal government, and elections. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | congress | congress | American | American | system | system | theory | theory | legislature | legislature | sociological models | sociological models | economic models | economic models | legislative behavior | legislative behavior | floor decision-making | floor decision-making | committee behavior | committee behavior | political parties | political parties | relations | relations | Federal government | Federal government | elections | elections

License

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17.188J Labor and Politics (MIT) 17.188J Labor and Politics (MIT)

Description

This graduate research and reading seminar examines an array of issues facing labor in today's global world. The premise of this course is that recent developments (e.g., globalization, liberalization, privatization, etc.) have created a mix of opportunities and risks for labor in most developing countries. This graduate research and reading seminar examines an array of issues facing labor in today's global world. The premise of this course is that recent developments (e.g., globalization, liberalization, privatization, etc.) have created a mix of opportunities and risks for labor in most developing countries.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | labor | labor | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | foreign investment | foreign investment | global supply chains | global supply chains | economic development | economic development | job growth | job growth | social safety nets | social safety nets | environmental standards | environmental standards | poverty | poverty

License

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17.THT Thesis Research Design Seminar (MIT) 17.THT Thesis Research Design Seminar (MIT)

Description

This seminar is for students who plan to write a senior thesis in Political Science, and is required of all MIT Political Science majors. Seminar participants will develop their research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame their research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, draft the introductory and methodology sections of their theses, and write a complete prospectus of the project. This seminar is for students who plan to write a senior thesis in Political Science, and is required of all MIT Political Science majors. Seminar participants will develop their research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame their research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, draft the introductory and methodology sections of their theses, and write a complete prospectus of the project.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | seminar | seminar | senior thesis | senior thesis | research topics | research topics | scholarship | scholarship | research questions | research questions | methodology | methodology | analysis | analysis | prospectus | prospectus

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT) 17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence. This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | U.S. Intelligence Community | U.S. Intelligence Community | national security | national security | policymakers | policymakers | future role | future role | 9/11 | 9/11 | Iraq | Iraq | national intelligence | national intelligence | National Security Act of 1947 | National Security Act of 1947

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.432 Causes of War: Theory and Method (MIT) 17.432 Causes of War: Theory and Method (MIT)

Description

This course explores the causes of modern war with a focus on preventable causes. Course readings cover theoretical, historical, and methodological topics. Major theories of war are explored and assessed in the first few weeks of the class, asking at each stage "are these good theories?" and "how could they be tested?" Basic social scientific inference -- what are theories? What are good theories? How should theories be framed and tested? -- and case study methodology are also discussed. The second half of the course explores the history of the outbreak of some major wars. We use these cases as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?" This course explores the causes of modern war with a focus on preventable causes. Course readings cover theoretical, historical, and methodological topics. Major theories of war are explored and assessed in the first few weeks of the class, asking at each stage "are these good theories?" and "how could they be tested?" Basic social scientific inference -- what are theories? What are good theories? How should theories be framed and tested? -- and case study methodology are also discussed. The second half of the course explores the history of the outbreak of some major wars. We use these cases as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?"

Subjects

Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | war | war | preventable causes | preventable causes | theoretical | theoretical | historical | historical | methodological | methodological | topics | topics | social scientific inference | social scientific inference | history | history | outbreak | outbreak | causes | causes | method. | method. | method | method

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT) 17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After

Subjects

Political science | Political science | fundamental ideas | fundamental ideas | theories | theories | methods | methods | contemporary | contemporary | major books | major books | articles | articles | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | American | American | comparative politics | comparative politics | Rawls | Rawls | A Theory of Justice | A Theory of Justice | Hayek | Hayek | The Constitution of Liberty | The Constitution of Liberty | Arrow | Arrow | Social Choice and Individual Values | Social Choice and Individual Values | Olson | Olson | The Logic of Collective Action | The Logic of Collective Action | Waltz | Waltz | Theory of International Relations | Theory of International Relations | Bull | Bull | The Anarchical Society | The Anarchical Society | Foucault | Foucault | Discipline and Punish | Discipline and Punish | Elster | Elster | Cement of Society | Cement of Society | Keohane | Keohane | After Hegemony | After Hegemony | Allison | Allison | Zelikow | Zelikow | The Essence of Decision | The Essence of Decision | Doyle | Doyle | Kant | Kant | Liberal Legacies | Liberal Legacies | Foreign Affairs | Foreign Affairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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De cive: containing the elements of civill politie in the agreement which it hath both with naturall and divine lawes in which is demonstrated, both what the origine of justice is, and wherein the essence of Christian religion doth consist together with the nature, limits and qualifications both of regiment and subjectionThe citizen De cive: containing the elements of civill politie in the agreement which it hath both with naturall and divine lawes in which is demonstrated, both what the origine of justice is, and wherein the essence of Christian religion doth consist together with the nature, limits and qualifications both of regiment and subjectionThe citizen

Description

ebook version of De cive: containing the elements of civill politie in the agreement which it hath both with naturall and divine lawes in which is demonstrated, both what the origine of justice is, and wherein the essence of Christian religion doth consist together with the nature, limits and qualifications both of regiment and subjectionThe citizen ebook version of De cive: containing the elements of civill politie in the agreement which it hath both with naturall and divine lawes in which is demonstrated, both what the origine of justice is, and wherein the essence of Christian religion doth consist together with the nature, limits and qualifications both of regiment and subjectionThe citizen

Subjects

kind | kind | Political science -- Early works to 1800 | Political science -- Early works to 1800 | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Sandwich that Sabotaged Civilisation The Sandwich that Sabotaged Civilisation

Description

Presented by Dr Paul Miller, Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Birmingham (UK) and Associate Professor of History at McDaniel College (US), this video and audio podcast explores how a well known photograph and an infamous lunch break have … Continue reading → Presented by Dr Paul Miller, Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Birmingham (UK) and Associate Professor of History at McDaniel College (US), this video and audio podcast explores how a well known photograph and an infamous lunch break have … Continue reading →

Subjects

Consent | Dissent and Revolution | Consent | Dissent and Revolution | Teaching | Teaching | The Memory of War | The Memory of War | 070 (News media journalism publishing) | 070 (News media journalism publishing) | 320 (Political science) | 320 (Political science) | 399 (Customs of war & diplomacy) | 399 (Customs of war & diplomacy) | 900 (History & geography) | 900 (History & geography) | 940 (General history of Europe) | 940 (General history of Europe) | PN4699-5650 (Journalism) | PN4699-5650 (Journalism) | Podcast | Podcast | 399 (Customs of war & diplomacy) | 399 (Customs of war & diplomacy) | 900 (History & geography) | 900 (History & geography)

License

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