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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics, (2) Electoral Politics, (3) Interest Group Politics, and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part of the semester focuses on public policy, divided into seven major policy areas: (1) Social Policy, (2) Foreign Policy, (3) Defense Policy, (4) Energy Policy, (5) Science and Technology Policy, (6) Industrial Policy, and (7) Trade Policy. We will try to understand the ways in which the ac This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics, (2) Electoral Politics, (3) Interest Group Politics, and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part of the semester focuses on public policy, divided into seven major policy areas: (1) Social Policy, (2) Foreign Policy, (3) Defense Policy, (4) Energy Policy, (5) Science and Technology Policy, (6) Industrial Policy, and (7) Trade Policy. We will try to understand the ways in which the ac

Subjects

Japan | Japan | History | History | Politics | Politics | Society | Society | Party Politics | Party Politics | Elec | Elec | Electoral Politics | Electoral Politics | Interest Group Politics | Interest Group Politics | Bureaucratic Politics | Bureaucratic Politics | Social Policy | Social Policy | Foreign Policy | Foreign Policy | Defense Policy | Defense Policy | Energy Policy | Energy Policy | Science and Technology Policy | Science and Technology Policy | Industrial Policy | Industrial Policy | Trade Policy | Trade Policy

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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test Brexit Buyers’ Remorse? Non, on ne bregrette rien test Brexit Buyers’ Remorse? Non, on ne bregrette rien

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The vote to leave the EU was an outcome which surprised most commentators, bookies, and even those who voted for the winning side. In the aftermath of the result, John Gray, a popular political theorist, wrote that ‘voters inflicted the biggest shock on the establishment since Churchill was ousted in 1945’. It is hard to think that he is wrong. The only social classes which predominately voted Remain were ABs (affluent and middle-class voters), whereas C1 C2 DE (lower middle-class and working-class) voters all delivered majorities for Leave. As I predicted on this blog in January and contrary to many ... The vote to leave the EU was an outcome which surprised most commentators, bookies, and even those who voted for the winning side. In the aftermath of the result, John Gray, a popular political theorist, wrote that ‘voters inflicted the biggest shock on the establishment since Churchill was ousted in 1945’. It is hard to think that he is wrong. The only social classes which predominately voted Remain were ABs (affluent and middle-class voters), whereas C1 C2 DE (lower middle-class and working-class) voters all delivered majorities for Leave. As I predicted on this blog in January and contrary to many ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | Law | Law | Political Science | Political Science | Political Theory | Political Theory | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | European Union | European Union | Immigration | Immigration | UK Immigration | UK Immigration

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics, (2) Electoral Politics, (3) Interest Group Politics, and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part of the semester focuses on public policy, divided into seven major policy areas: (1) Social Policy, (2) Foreign Policy, (3) Defense Policy, (4) Energy Policy, (5) Science and Technology Policy, (6) Industrial Policy, and (7) Trade Policy. We will try to understand the ways in which the ac

Subjects

Japan | History | Politics | Society | Party Politics | Elec | Electoral Politics | Interest Group Politics | Bureaucratic Politics | Social Policy | Foreign Policy | Defense Policy | Energy Policy | Science and Technology Policy | Industrial Policy | Trade Policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Understanding global politics Understanding global politics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches to politics in a global context. Suitable for: Undergraduate level one students Dr Vanessa Pupavac, Dr Xiaoke Zhang, Dr Sabine Carey, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Vanessa Pupavac is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. She has previously worke This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches to politics in a global context. Suitable for: Undergraduate level one students Dr Vanessa Pupavac, Dr Xiaoke Zhang, Dr Sabine Carey, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Vanessa Pupavac is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. She has previously worke

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Global Politics | Global Politics | International Relations | International Relations | Politics | Politics | Realism | Realism | Liberalism | Liberalism | Social Constructivism | Social Constructivism | Marxist Theories of International Relations | Marxist Theories of International Relations | Ethics and International Relations | Ethics and International Relations | International History versus International Relations | International History versus International Relations

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Four Lessons from Brexit and its Fallout Four Lessons from Brexit and its Fallout

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There is no shortage of lessons to be learned from Brexit and its fallout – for politicians, businesses and the public alike. For strategists, analysts and advisors, these past few weeks have provided a host of examples of both good and bad practice. Surveying recent events, four take-aways stand out: 1) Forecast, don’t predict No one predicted this. Nor did the polls or the betting markets. Even the leaders of the Leave campaign did not predict Brexit. More than this, though, no one predicted that within weeks of a vote all of the Leave campaign’s victorious leaders would have resigned ... There is no shortage of lessons to be learned from Brexit and its fallout – for politicians, businesses and the public alike. For strategists, analysts and advisors, these past few weeks have provided a host of examples of both good and bad practice. Surveying recent events, four take-aways stand out: 1) Forecast, don’t predict No one predicted this. Nor did the polls or the betting markets. Even the leaders of the Leave campaign did not predict Brexit. More than this, though, no one predicted that within weeks of a vote all of the Leave campaign’s victorious leaders would have resigned ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | International Institutions | International Institutions | brexit | brexit

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Brexit and the Radical Tory Tradition of British Socialism Brexit and the Radical Tory Tradition of British Socialism

Description

In the spasms of defeat following the EU referendum, some Remain commentators have suggested that Brexit was a fundamentally racist choice. Indeed, one of the most forceful was Richard Elliot’s assertion on this blog that Brexit supporters are ‘the Cecil Rhodes of the twenty-first century’. Elliot’s article reflects the stifling academic consensus which cannot even comprehend how ‘good people’ could vote to Leave. This breathtakingly simplistic analysis amounts to little more than the assertion that clever, open-minded people voted to Remain whereas stupid, backward people voted to Leave. It echoes the debate over joining the Euro fifteen years ago when, ... In the spasms of defeat following the EU referendum, some Remain commentators have suggested that Brexit was a fundamentally racist choice. Indeed, one of the most forceful was Richard Elliot’s assertion on this blog that Brexit supporters are ‘the Cecil Rhodes of the twenty-first century’. Elliot’s article reflects the stifling academic consensus which cannot even comprehend how ‘good people’ could vote to Leave. This breathtakingly simplistic analysis amounts to little more than the assertion that clever, open-minded people voted to Remain whereas stupid, backward people voted to Leave. It echoes the debate over joining the Euro fifteen years ago when, ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Political Theory | Political Theory | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | European Union | European Union | Socialism | Socialism

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Primaries as Sports and Spectacle: Sports Metaphors in Twenty-First Century Presidential Primary Debates Primaries as Sports and Spectacle: Sports Metaphors in Twenty-First Century Presidential Primary Debates

Description

‘The Brawl Begins’, an article about the 2016 primaries in The Economist provides the most overt manifestation of how a discourse of sports has permeated contemporary political reporting. Describing elections as a “jaw-dropping spectacle” or referring to the Iowa caucuses as the “opening round” in a political boxing match, a prime example of horse-race journalism, is particularly prevalent in presidential primary elections. This is due to the lengthening of the primary period and the truism that the “newsworthiness of what a candidate says about public policies is limited” because “once a candidate makes known his position on an issue, further statements concerning ... ‘The Brawl Begins’, an article about the 2016 primaries in The Economist provides the most overt manifestation of how a discourse of sports has permeated contemporary political reporting. Describing elections as a “jaw-dropping spectacle” or referring to the Iowa caucuses as the “opening round” in a political boxing match, a prime example of horse-race journalism, is particularly prevalent in presidential primary elections. This is due to the lengthening of the primary period and the truism that the “newsworthiness of what a candidate says about public policies is limited” because “once a candidate makes known his position on an issue, further statements concerning ...

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | Media | Media | US Politics | US Politics | American Politics | American Politics | Sport | Sport | US Elections | US Elections

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What is politics? What is politics?

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This free course, What is politics?, introduces you to the world of politics. It is dedicated primarily to answering the question of what politics is. Although the question might seem rather simple, it elicits various, often contradictory responses. As you will realise, in politics as in much of the humanities and social sciences definitive answers are difficult to come by. What politics is and equally, who does it, and where it is done are hotly debated and highly contested. This OpenLearn course will introduce you to some of these debates, and their implications for the study and practice of politics. First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 This free course, What is politics?, introduces you to the world of politics. It is dedicated primarily to answering the question of what politics is. Although the question might seem rather simple, it elicits various, often contradictory responses. As you will realise, in politics as in much of the humanities and social sciences definitive answers are difficult to come by. What politics is and equally, who does it, and where it is done are hotly debated and highly contested. This OpenLearn course will introduce you to some of these debates, and their implications for the study and practice of politics. First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015 First published on Fri, 05 Jun 2015 as What is politics?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2015

Subjects

Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Politics | DD211_1 | DD211_1 | politics | politics | political theory | political theory | government | government

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine

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Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires. Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires.

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

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The law-making process in England and Wales The law-making process in England and Wales

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This free course, The law-making process in England and Wales, introduces you to the sources of law in England and Wales. It examines the democratic law-making process and how and by whom proposed legislation is initiated, before introducing you to the Westminster Parliament, which creates legislation. It is within this Parliament that proposed legislation is considered and becomes law. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, The law-making process in England and Wales, introduces you to the sources of law in England and Wales. It examines the democratic law-making process and how and by whom proposed legislation is initiated, before introducing you to the Westminster Parliament, which creates legislation. It is within this Parliament that proposed legislation is considered and becomes law. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as The law-making process in England and Wales. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | The Law | The Law | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | W101_1 | W101_1 | legislative process | legislative process | Westminster | Westminster | parliament | parliament | devolution | devolution | democracy | democracy | law | law

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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The 1975 Referendum on Europe The 1975 Referendum on Europe

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The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (as it then was) on 1 January 1973 after negotiations by the Conservative government led by Edward Heath. In the run up to the subsequent 1974 General Election the Labour Party pledged, in its manifesto, the United Kingdom’s first nationwide referendum on whether to stay part of the Economic Community on renegotiated terms or to completely part company. With a Labour victory, the new Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, followed through on his promise and a referendum was held on 5 Jun 1975. The outcome was an overwhelming victory (67%) for the ‘In’ campaign. ... The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (as it then was) on 1 January 1973 after negotiations by the Conservative government led by Edward Heath. In the run up to the subsequent 1974 General Election the Labour Party pledged, in its manifesto, the United Kingdom’s first nationwide referendum on whether to stay part of the Economic Community on renegotiated terms or to completely part company. With a Labour victory, the new Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, followed through on his promise and a referendum was held on 5 Jun 1975. The outcome was an overwhelming victory (67%) for the ‘In’ campaign. ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | EU referendum | EU referendum | European Union | European Union

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The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe

Description

Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | inequality | inequality | Redistribution | Redistribution

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Politics in 60 seconds. Disaster politics Politics in 60 seconds. Disaster politics

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Dr Vanessa Pupavac defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focusses on disaster politics as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education Dr Vanessa Pupavac, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Vanessa Pupavac is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. She has previously worked for the UN Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia and other international organisations. Dr Vanessa Pupavac's research encompasses international human rights, children's rights, linguistic rights, humanitarian and development politics. In recent years she has been examining the international politics of t Dr Vanessa Pupavac defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focusses on disaster politics as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education Dr Vanessa Pupavac, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Vanessa Pupavac is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. She has previously worked for the UN Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia and other international organisations. Dr Vanessa Pupavac's research encompasses international human rights, children's rights, linguistic rights, humanitarian and development politics. In recent years she has been examining the international politics of t

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Politics | Politics | Political Concepts | Political Concepts | Disaster Politics | Disaster Politics | UKOER | UKOER

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Exit, voice, and loyalty in Europe Exit, voice, and loyalty in Europe

Description

Complex situations often require us to take a step back for what consultants call the 10,000 feet view. The problems facing the EU these days—from Grexit to Brexit—surely seem impenetrable. A convoluted potpourri of economic, financial, and political crises leaves most observers either completely disengaged or increasingly reliant on their gut feelings. To wrap one's head around the forces that threaten the European project, it helps to think in very simple categories: exit, voice, and loyalty. Few theories still prompt real-life insights almost half a century after their publication. Albert O. Hirschman's "Exit, Voice, and Loyalty" surely falls into this category. Put simply, Hirschman postulated that members who are unsatisfied with an organization they are part of, can either ex Complex situations often require us to take a step back for what consultants call the 10,000 feet view. The problems facing the EU these days—from Grexit to Brexit—surely seem impenetrable. A convoluted potpourri of economic, financial, and political crises leaves most observers either completely disengaged or increasingly reliant on their gut feelings. To wrap one's head around the forces that threaten the European project, it helps to think in very simple categories: exit, voice, and loyalty. Few theories still prompt real-life insights almost half a century after their publication. Albert O. Hirschman's "Exit, Voice, and Loyalty" surely falls into this category. Put simply, Hirschman postulated that members who are unsatisfied with an organization they are part of, can either ex

Subjects

European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | International Relations | International Relations | Law | Law | Political Economy | Political Economy | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics

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s refugees s refugees

Description

In a letter published in The New Statesman, a number of Oxford academics argue that the current government position is bad policy, bad politics and a betrayal of a proud British tradition. Dear Prime Minister and Home Secretary, We the undersigned are dedicated to creating a socially just world. We spend our working lives supporting and promoting research, initiatives, and projects which will create a fairer and more equitable society for everyone. Among our number are many leading experts on community cohesion, asylum, refugees, migration, politics, public opinion, policy and law. We believe the Government’s current position on the European refugee crisis is misguided and requires urgent change. Britain has a long and proud tradition of providing sanctuary to those in need. Thousands In a letter published in The New Statesman, a number of Oxford academics argue that the current government position is bad policy, bad politics and a betrayal of a proud British tradition. Dear Prime Minister and Home Secretary, We the undersigned are dedicated to creating a socially just world. We spend our working lives supporting and promoting research, initiatives, and projects which will create a fairer and more equitable society for everyone. Among our number are many leading experts on community cohesion, asylum, refugees, migration, politics, public opinion, policy and law. We believe the Government’s current position on the European refugee crisis is misguided and requires urgent change. Britain has a long and proud tradition of providing sanctuary to those in need. Thousands

Subjects

British Politics | British Politics | Fragile and Post Conflict States | Fragile and Post Conflict States | Law | Law | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics

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Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate

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The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

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Post-Brexit wave of hate has laid bare the tensions and divisions in Britain Post-Brexit wave of hate has laid bare the tensions and divisions in Britain

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Following the vote to leave the European Union, there has been a sudden upsurge in racist incidents in Britain. The wave of hate has taken many people by surprise, and has laid bare some of the tensions and divisions eating away at the heart of the United Kingdom. It has also called into question Britain’s claim to be a liberal and inclusive multicultural society, leading to considerable soul searching. A state that has often spoken out against identity politics and prejudice abroad is now facing up to the reality that these issues need to be addressed back home. Predictably and ... Following the vote to leave the European Union, there has been a sudden upsurge in racist incidents in Britain. The wave of hate has taken many people by surprise, and has laid bare some of the tensions and divisions eating away at the heart of the United Kingdom. It has also called into question Britain’s claim to be a liberal and inclusive multicultural society, leading to considerable soul searching. A state that has often spoken out against identity politics and prejudice abroad is now facing up to the reality that these issues need to be addressed back home. Predictably and ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | Immigration | Immigration | Race | Race | UK Immigration | UK Immigration

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Modern slavery Modern slavery

Description

This free course, Modern slavery, is designed to develop an understanding of the international system of human rights protection in relation to modern slavery, but also encourage an appreciation of the influence of International Human Rights Law on the development of the domestic system of human rights protection. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Modern slavery, is designed to develop an understanding of the international system of human rights protection in relation to modern slavery, but also encourage an appreciation of the influence of International Human Rights Law on the development of the domestic system of human rights protection. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

The Law | The Law | People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | W102_1 | W102_1 | international law | international law | human rights | human rights | slavery | slavery | modern slavery | modern slavery | trafficking in human beings | trafficking in human beings | forced labour | forced labour

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Scotland: What will happen after the vote

Description

At 650 pages Scotland's Future is not a light read. It stands as the Scottish Government’s manifesto for a yes vote in the independence referendum. The volume ranges from profoundly important questions relating to currency and Scotland’s membership of the European Union, right down to weather-forecasting and the future of the National Lottery. Though it is likely many copies of Scotland’s Future will be printed, it is unlikely many will be read from cover to cover. Its authors probably do not regret its length: by its very heft, the volume seeks to rebut claims that the consequences of independence have not been carefully thought through. This post considers the immediate constitutional consequences of a yes vote in light of Scotland’s Future. Its central argume

Subjects

British Politics | European Politics and Society | International Relations | Law | Political Science | The EU and European Politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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The Boundaries Review is a chance to bring back multi-member constituencies The Boundaries Review is a chance to bring back multi-member constituencies

Description

In earlier generations voters were spoiled for choice. Between 1832 and 1885 many had more than one vote in general elections. The British parliament contained county and borough constituencies and these, depending on size, would return two to four MPs with voters able to vote for as many candidates as there were seats to be filled. A recipe for chaos, perhaps, but there were advantages to these multi-member constituencies. For instance, the Liberals could put up a left-wing radical as well as a traditional Whig, thus broadening their appeal to the electorate. [One wonders whether such an approach could appeal ... In earlier generations voters were spoiled for choice. Between 1832 and 1885 many had more than one vote in general elections. The British parliament contained county and borough constituencies and these, depending on size, would return two to four MPs with voters able to vote for as many candidates as there were seats to be filled. A recipe for chaos, perhaps, but there were advantages to these multi-member constituencies. For instance, the Liberals could put up a left-wing radical as well as a traditional Whig, thus broadening their appeal to the electorate. [One wonders whether such an approach could appeal ...

Subjects

British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | british elections | british elections | Elections | Elections

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The old whig: ... On the state of the peerage. With remarks upon the Plebeian. The old whig: ... On the state of the peerage. With remarks upon the Plebeian.

Description

ebook version of The old whig: ... On the state of the peerage. With remarks upon the Plebeian. ebook version of The old whig: ... On the state of the peerage. With remarks upon the Plebeian.

Subjects

kind | kind | Nobility -- History -- Great Britain | Nobility -- History -- Great Britain | Constitutional history -- Great Britain | Constitutional history -- Great Britain | Great Britain -- Politics and government | Great Britain -- Politics and government | Great Britain -- Parliament | Great Britain -- Parliament | Periodicals -- 18th century. -- England | Periodicals -- 18th century. -- England | Essays -- 18th century. -- England | Essays -- 18th century. -- England | Plebeian | Plebeian | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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Comparative paths in democratisation

Description

Presenter Tom Cutterham (Oxford) and discussant Joanna Innes (Oxford) look at Mark Philp's work focusing on comparative paths in democratisation. This talk, introduced by current Head of Department Elizabeth Frazer, is taken from 'A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp'. Mark Philp was our founding Head of Department (2000-2005) and Tutorial Fellow at Oriel College (1983-2013). He is now, since 2013, Professor of History at the University of Warwick. His work in the fields of political thought and political theory are notable for their interdisciplinarity as well as the excellence of their scholarship and depth of philosophical analysis. The event took place at the Department of Politics and International Relations on 22 April 2014. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Mark Philp | Comparative Politics | democratisation | democratization | Mark Philp | Comparative Politics | democratisation | democratization | 2014-04-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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’s new right wing

Description

While political parties promoting national liberal, conservative and Euro-sceptic positions have experienced a rise in nearly all EU member states over the past years, Germany appeared to be the last safe-haven left. However, this German exception seems to be over. Since last September the Alternative für Deutschland (Alternative for Germany, AfD) has entered three regional parliaments within two weeks, living up to its success in this year’s European elections. Supported by around 10 per cent of the voters, the AfD poses a problem to the Christian Democratic Christian Democratic Union (CDU)/Christian Social Union (CSU) and, especially, to the liberal Free Democratic Party (FDP). They have to fear the establishment of a party which may challenge their dominance over Germany’s politica

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics

License

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Pigs' meat; or, lessons for the swinish multitude: Published in weekly penny numbers, collected by the poor man's advocate (an old veteran in the cause of freedom) in the course of his reading for more than twenty years. Intended to promote among the labouring part of mankind proper ideas of their situation, of their importance, and of their rights. And to convince them that their forlorn condition has not been entirely overlooked and forgotten, nor their just cause unpleaded, neither by their maker not by the best and most enlightened of men in all ages. [pt.2] Pigs' meat; or, lessons for the swinish multitude: Published in weekly penny numbers, collected by the poor man's advocate (an old veteran in the cause of freedom) in the course of his reading for more than twenty years. Intended to promote among the labouring part of mankind proper ideas of their situation, of their importance, and of their rights. And to convince them that their forlorn condition has not been entirely overlooked and forgotten, nor their just cause unpleaded, neither by their maker not by the best and most enlightened of men in all ages. [pt.2]

Description

ebook version of Pigs' meat; or, lessons for the swinish multitude: Published in weekly penny numbers, collected by the poor man's advocate (an old veteran in the cause of freedom) in the course of his reading for more than twenty years. Intended to promote among the labouring part of mankind proper ideas of their situation, of their importance, and of their rights. And to convince them that their forlorn condition has not been entirely overlooked and forgotten, nor their just cause unpleaded, neither by their maker not by the best and most enlightened of men in all ages. [pt.2] ebook version of Pigs' meat; or, lessons for the swinish multitude: Published in weekly penny numbers, collected by the poor man's advocate (an old veteran in the cause of freedom) in the course of his reading for more than twenty years. Intended to promote among the labouring part of mankind proper ideas of their situation, of their importance, and of their rights. And to convince them that their forlorn condition has not been entirely overlooked and forgotten, nor their just cause unpleaded, neither by their maker not by the best and most enlightened of men in all ages. [pt.2]

Subjects

kind | kind | Poor -- Law and legislation -- Great Britain | Poor -- Law and legislation -- Great Britain | Political rights -- Great Britain | Political rights -- Great Britain | Great Britain -- Politics and government | Great Britain -- Politics and government | Protest literature -- 18th century. -- England | Protest literature -- 18th century. -- England | Periodicals -- 18th century. -- England | Periodicals -- 18th century. -- England | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Welfare reconstruction Welfare reconstruction

Description

This free course examines the approach adopted by Tony Blair and New Labour to welfare reconstruction in the United Kingdom. Using extracts from speeches made by Tony Blair, you will listen to a discussion on how the Welfare State was remade by the 'New Right'. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Welfare reconstruction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course examines the approach adopted by Tony Blair and New Labour to welfare reconstruction in the United Kingdom. Using extracts from speeches made by Tony Blair, you will listen to a discussion on how the Welfare State was remade by the 'New Right'. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Welfare reconstruction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Politics | Politics | audio | audio | New Labour | New Labour | Labour Party | Labour Party | D218_8 | D218_8

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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