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21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT) 21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT)

Description

This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial

Subjects

libertarianism | libertarianism | history | history | politics | politics | state | state | regulatory state | regulatory state | freedom | freedom | property | property | equality | equality | community | community | republicanism | republicanism | liberty | liberty | slavery | slavery | religious freedom | religious freedom | civil liberties | civil liberties | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | health care | health care | financial market | financial market | the internet | the internet | Rawls | Rawls | Nozick | Nozick | Obamacare | Obamacare | Rand Paul | Rand Paul | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | de Toqueville | de Toqueville | economic good | economic good | Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | capitalism | capitalism | John Locke | John Locke | distributive justice | distributive justice | communitarianism | communitarianism | civil republicanism | civil republicanism | chattel | chattel | Freedom Principle | Freedom Principle | antislavery | antislavery | First Amendment | First Amendment | free exercise | free exercise | religious accomodation | religious accomodation | phone surveillance | phone surveillance | private regulation | private regulation | Aaron Swartz | Aaron Swartz | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.231 Ethics (MIT) 24.231 Ethics (MIT)

Description

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why? This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Subjects

ethics | ethics | euthyphro | euthyphro | Plato | Plato | goodness | goodness | non-naturalism | non-naturalism | G. E. Moore | G. E. Moore | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | Alfred Jules Ayer | Alfred Jules Ayer | David Brink | David Brink | cognitivism | cognitivism | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Nicholas Sturgeon | Nicholas Sturgeon | observation | observation | morality | morality | moral relativism | moral relativism | Philippa Foot | Philippa Foot | David Lyons | David Lyons | incoherence | incoherence | ethical relativism | ethical relativism | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit | Alastair Norcross | Alastair Norcross | philosophy | philosophy | Bernard Williams | Bernard Williams | James Lenman | James Lenman | consequentialism | consequentialism | cluelessness | cluelessness | Peter Singer | Peter Singer | act-utilitarianism | act-utilitarianism | John Rawls | John Rawls | rules | rules | Thomas Nagel | Thomas Nagel | famine | famine | affluence | affluence | Nomy Arpaly | Nomy Arpaly | moral worth | moral worth | Susan Wolf | Susan Wolf | moral saints | moral saints | Peter van Inwagen | Peter van Inwagen | free will | free will | determinism | determinism | Harry Frankfurt | Harry Frankfurt | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | moral luck | moral luck

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT) 17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After

Subjects

Political science | Political science | fundamental ideas | fundamental ideas | theories | theories | methods | methods | contemporary | contemporary | major books | major books | articles | articles | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | American | American | comparative politics | comparative politics | Rawls | Rawls | A Theory of Justice | A Theory of Justice | Hayek | Hayek | The Constitution of Liberty | The Constitution of Liberty | Arrow | Arrow | Social Choice and Individual Values | Social Choice and Individual Values | Olson | Olson | The Logic of Collective Action | The Logic of Collective Action | Waltz | Waltz | Theory of International Relations | Theory of International Relations | Bull | Bull | The Anarchical Society | The Anarchical Society | Foucault | Foucault | Discipline and Punish | Discipline and Punish | Elster | Elster | Cement of Society | Cement of Society | Keohane | Keohane | After Hegemony | After Hegemony | Allison | Allison | Zelikow | Zelikow | The Essence of Decision | The Essence of Decision | Doyle | Doyle | Kant | Kant | Liberal Legacies | Liberal Legacies | Foreign Affairs | Foreign Affairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT) 17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others. This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | norms of justice | interstate | interstate | political justice | political justice | economic justice | economic justice | human rights | human rights | skepticism about global justice | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | global democracy | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | rights to control borders | Kant | Kant | Habermas | Habermas | Rawls | Rawls | Sen | Sen | Beitz | Beitz | Nussbaum | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 17.000 | 24.611 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After

Subjects

Political science | fundamental ideas | theories | methods | contemporary | major books | articles | political theory | international relations | American | comparative politics | Rawls | A Theory of Justice | Hayek | The Constitution of Liberty | Arrow | Social Choice and Individual Values | Olson | The Logic of Collective Action | Waltz | Theory of International Relations | Bull | The Anarchical Society | Foucault | Discipline and Punish | Elster | Cement of Society | Keohane | After Hegemony | Allison | Zelikow | The Essence of Decision | Doyle | Kant | Liberal Legacies | Foreign Affairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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24.231 Ethics (MIT)

Description

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Subjects

ethics | euthyphro | Plato | goodness | non-naturalism | G. E. Moore | non-cognitivism | Alfred Jules Ayer | David Brink | cognitivism | Gilbert Harman | Nicholas Sturgeon | observation | morality | moral relativism | Philippa Foot | David Lyons | incoherence | ethical relativism | John Stuart Mill | utilitarianism | Robert Nozick | Derek Parfit | Alastair Norcross | philosophy | Bernard Williams | James Lenman | consequentialism | cluelessness | Peter Singer | act-utilitarianism | John Rawls | rules | Thomas Nagel | famine | affluence | Nomy Arpaly | moral worth | Susan Wolf | moral saints | Peter van Inwagen | free will | determinism | Harry Frankfurt | moral responsibility | moral luck

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | interstate | political justice | economic justice | human rights | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | Kant | Habermas | Rawls | Sen | Beitz | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | interstate | political justice | economic justice | human rights | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | Kant | Habermas | Rawls | Sen | Beitz | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT)

Description

This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial

Subjects

libertarianism | history | politics | state | regulatory state | freedom | property | equality | community | republicanism | liberty | slavery | religious freedom | civil liberties | counter-terrorism | health care | financial market | the internet | Rawls | Nozick | Obamacare | Rand Paul | John Stuart Mill | de Toqueville | economic good | Martin Luther King | capitalism | John Locke | distributive justice | communitarianism | civil republicanism | chattel | Freedom Principle | antislavery | First Amendment | free exercise | religious accomodation | phone surveillance | private regulation | Aaron Swartz | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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