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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | Shakespeare | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Marlowe | Jonson | Jonson | Webster | Webster | Ford | Ford | English Renaissance drama | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | culture | aesthetic | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | the private and the public | allegory | allegory | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | drama | drama | gender dynamics | gender dynamics | class dynamics | class dynamics | private | private | public | public | theatrically | theatrically | meta-theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | money | trade | trade | colonialism | colonialism | body | body | metaphor | metaphor | theatre | theatre | society | society | Spanish tragedy | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess | Island Princess

License

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Jonson | Webster | Ford | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | allegory | aesthetic form | drama | gender dynamics | class dynamics | private | public | theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | trade | colonialism | body | metaphor | theatre | society | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess

License

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21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT) 21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)

Description

The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period. The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period.

Subjects

Renaissance | Renaissance | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Demography | Demography | Global Trade | Global Trade | Peasantry | Peasantry | The Black Death | Humanism | The Black Death | Humanism | Burgundy | Burgundy | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Christian Humanism | Christian Humanism | Martin Luther | Martin Luther

License

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21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT) 21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)

Description

The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period. The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period.

Subjects

Renaissance | Renaissance | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Demography | Demography | Global Trade | Global Trade | Peasantry | Peasantry | The Black Death | Humanism | The Black Death | Humanism | Burgundy | Burgundy | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Christian Humanism | Christian Humanism | Martin Luther | Martin Luther | fourteenth-century Italy | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Geography | The Black Death | The Black Death | Humanism | Humanism

License

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Numbers: Five Centuries of Digital Design (MIT) Numbers: Five Centuries of Digital Design (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to highlight some technical aspects of the classical tradition in architecture that have so far received only sporadic attention. It is well known that quantification has always been an essential component of classical design: proportional systems in particular have been keenly investigated. But the actual technical tools whereby quantitative precision was conceived, represented, transmitted, and implemented in pre-modern architecture remain mostly unexplored. By showing that a dialectical relationship between architectural theory and data-processing technologies was as crucial in the past as it is today, this course hopes to promote a more historically aware understanding of the current computer-induced transformations in architectural design. The aim of this course is to highlight some technical aspects of the classical tradition in architecture that have so far received only sporadic attention. It is well known that quantification has always been an essential component of classical design: proportional systems in particular have been keenly investigated. But the actual technical tools whereby quantitative precision was conceived, represented, transmitted, and implemented in pre-modern architecture remain mostly unexplored. By showing that a dialectical relationship between architectural theory and data-processing technologies was as crucial in the past as it is today, this course hopes to promote a more historically aware understanding of the current computer-induced transformations in architectural design.

Subjects

drawing | drawing | design | design | computation | computation | mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | Alberti | Alberti | Serlio | Serlio | Brunelleschi | Brunelleschi | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | art | art | architecture | architecture | numeric control | numeric control | construction | construction | historical design | historical design | digital design | digital design | Gehry | Gehry | automation | automation | numeracy | numeracy

License

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21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT) 21H.311 The Renaissance, 1300-1600 (MIT)

Description

The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period. The "Renaissance" as a phenomenon in European history is best understood as a series of social, political, and cultural responses to an intellectual trend which began in Italy in the fourteenth century. This intellectual tendency, known as humanism, or the studia humanitatis, was at the heart of developments in literature, the arts, the sciences, religion, and government for almost three hundred years. In this class, we will highlight the history of humanism, but we will also study religious reformations, high politics, the agrarian world, and European conquest and expansion abroad in the period.

Subjects

Renaissance | Renaissance | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Demography | Demography | Global Trade | Global Trade | Peasantry | Peasantry | The Black Death | Humanism | The Black Death | Humanism | Burgundy | Burgundy | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Christian Humanism | Christian Humanism | Martin Luther | Martin Luther | fourteenth-century Italy | fourteenth-century Italy | Geography | Geography | The Black Death | The Black Death | Humanism | Humanism

License

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STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT) STS.002 Toward the Scientific Revolution (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine. This subject traces the evolution of ideas about nature, and how best to study and explain natural phenomena, beginning in ancient times and continuing through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. A central theme of the subject is the intertwining of conceptual and institutional relations within diverse areas of inquiry: cosmology, natural history, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Subjects

Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | science | science | cosmology | cosmology | natural history | natural history | physics | physics | mathematics | mathematics | astronomy | astronomy | medicine | medicine | alchemy | alchemy | technology | technology | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Hippocrates | Hippocrates | Ptolemy | Ptolemy | Euclid | Euclid | Galen | Galen | Vesalius | Vesalius | Copernicus | Copernicus | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | Bacon | Bacon | Descartes | Descartes | Newton | Newton | history | history | culture | culture | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | Latin West | Latin West | western | western | natural science | natural science

License

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21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT)

Description

What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work. What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work.

Subjects

Genesis | Genesis | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Rewriting Genesis | Rewriting Genesis

License

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

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21L.463 Renaissance Literature (MIT) 21L.463 Renaissance Literature (MIT)

Description

The Renaissance has justly become both famous and notorious as an age of discovery, and its voyages took place in many realms. This semester, we will read several history making narratives of early modern travel: first-hand accounts of discovery, captivity, conquest, or cultural encounter. As Europeans came to acquire experience of unfamiliar places, literary texts of the period began to assimilate this experience by describing imagined voyages across real or fantastic landscapes. Finally, voyages of exploration served Renaissance writers as a metaphor: for intellectual inquiry, for spiritual development, or for the pursuit of love. Among the literary genres sampled this semester will be sonnets, plays, prose narratives, utopias, and chivalric romance. Authors and travellers will include F The Renaissance has justly become both famous and notorious as an age of discovery, and its voyages took place in many realms. This semester, we will read several history making narratives of early modern travel: first-hand accounts of discovery, captivity, conquest, or cultural encounter. As Europeans came to acquire experience of unfamiliar places, literary texts of the period began to assimilate this experience by describing imagined voyages across real or fantastic landscapes. Finally, voyages of exploration served Renaissance writers as a metaphor: for intellectual inquiry, for spiritual development, or for the pursuit of love. Among the literary genres sampled this semester will be sonnets, plays, prose narratives, utopias, and chivalric romance. Authors and travellers will include F

Subjects

Renaissance | Renaissance | literature | literature | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Professor Vinaver | Professor Vinaver | Middle English | Middle English | Primum Mobile | Primum Mobile | House of Busirane | House of Busirane | Sawles Warde | Sawles Warde | Natalis Comes | Natalis Comes | Unmoved Mover | Unmoved Mover | Colin Clouts Come Home Againe | Colin Clouts Come Home Againe | Eniautos Daimon | Eniautos Daimon | Piers Plowman | Piers Plowman | Prince Arthur | Prince Arthur | Queen Elizabeth | Queen Elizabeth | Round Table | Round Table | Sir Orfeo | Sir Orfeo | heauy plight | heauy plight | neuer wight | neuer wight | knight aliue | knight aliue | wyld man | wyld man | liuing wight | liuing wight | first aduenture | first aduenture | lining wight | lining wight | more increast | more increast | straunger knight | straunger knight | vncouth sight | vncouth sight | vtmost date | vtmost date | saluage man | saluage man | euerlasting fame | euerlasting fame | euill plight | euill plight | straunge aduentures | straunge aduentures | haue rent | haue rent | deare besought | deare besought | nigh approcht | nigh approcht | euery ioynt | euery ioynt | yron man | yron man | braue knights | braue knights | faire damzell | faire damzell | forrest wyde | forrest wyde | euery vaine | euery vaine | heauens hight | heauens hight | Sir Guyon | Sir Guyon | Sir Calidore | Sir Calidore | Sir Satyrane | Sir Satyrane | Briton Prince | Briton Prince | Faerie Queene | Faerie Queene | Sir Calepine | Sir Calepine | Squire of Dames | Squire of Dames | Sir Paridell | Sir Paridell | Saint George | Saint George | Sir Triamond | Sir Triamond | Which Cambell | Which Cambell | Whom Calidore. | Whom Calidore.

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21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT)

Description

In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au

Subjects

John Milton | John Milton | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | Genesis | Genesis | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion

License

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | women authors | comfort women | comfort women | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | slave novel | slave novel | sensationalism | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | sentimentalism | realism | realism | postmodern fiction | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | American Revolution | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | Puritanism | SP.517 | SP.517 | WMN.517 | WMN.517

License

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21H.343J Making Books: The Renaissance and Today (MIT) 21H.343J Making Books: The Renaissance and Today (MIT)

Description

This course explores the impact of new technology on the recording and distribution of words and images at three different times: The invention of the printing press ca. 1450; the adaptation of electricity to communication technology in the 19th century (telegraph, telephone, phonograph); and the emergence of digital media today. Assignments include essays and online projects. Students also participate in the design and construction of a hand-set printing press. This course is also part of the Concourse program at MIT. This course explores the impact of new technology on the recording and distribution of words and images at three different times: The invention of the printing press ca. 1450; the adaptation of electricity to communication technology in the 19th century (telegraph, telephone, phonograph); and the emergence of digital media today. Assignments include essays and online projects. Students also participate in the design and construction of a hand-set printing press. This course is also part of the Concourse program at MIT.

Subjects

Gutenberg Bible | Gutenberg Bible | French Revolution | French Revolution | printing press | printing press | books | books | Renaissance period | Renaissance period | Early Modern period | Early Modern period | Gill and Edes | Gill and Edes | paper-making | paper-making | Book of Hours | Book of Hours | Nuremburg Chronicle | Nuremburg Chronicle | Decrees of Gregory IX | Decrees of Gregory IX | English Book of Martyrs | English Book of Martyrs | King James Bible | King James Bible | Lutheran Bible | Lutheran Bible | religion | religion | Hart Nautical Collection | Hart Nautical Collection | polyglot Bible | polyglot Bible | engraving | engraving | Ambroise Pare | Ambroise Pare | Gessner | Gessner | Galileo | Galileo | Tycho Brahe | Tycho Brahe | Spheres of Sacrobosco | Spheres of Sacrobosco | De Re Metallica | De Re Metallica | Mathematical Recreations | Mathematical Recreations | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Menocchio | Menocchio | Domenico Scandella | Domenico Scandella

License

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: From the Sonneteers to the Metaphysicals (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: From the Sonneteers to the Metaphysicals (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the most important practitioners of poetry in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, locating them in their historical and social contexts. We will be emphasizing love poetry or amatory verse, by combining close reading of selected poems with an investigation of the contexts of English verse. This course introduces students to some of the most important practitioners of poetry in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, locating them in their historical and social contexts. We will be emphasizing love poetry or amatory verse, by combining close reading of selected poems with an investigation of the contexts of English verse.

Subjects

sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England | sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England | love poetry or amatory verse | love poetry or amatory verse | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | sonnet | sonnet | Petrarch | Petrarch | Elizabethan England | Elizabethan England | metaphysical poets | metaphysical poets | Donne and Marvell | Donne and Marvell

License

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

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21L.420 Literary Studies: The Legacy of England (MIT) 21L.420 Literary Studies: The Legacy of England (MIT)

Description

Topic: The English sense of humor. This course examines English literature across genre and historical periods. It is designed for students who want to study English literature or writing in some depth, or to know more about English literary culture and history. Students will also learn about the relationships between literary themes, forms, and conventions and the times in which they were produced. Materials include: Medieval tales, riddles, and character sketches; Renaissance lyrics and a play, 18th-century satires in words and images, 19th century irony, modern stories and film. Topic: The English sense of humor. This course examines English literature across genre and historical periods. It is designed for students who want to study English literature or writing in some depth, or to know more about English literary culture and history. Students will also learn about the relationships between literary themes, forms, and conventions and the times in which they were produced. Materials include: Medieval tales, riddles, and character sketches; Renaissance lyrics and a play, 18th-century satires in words and images, 19th century irony, modern stories and film.

Subjects

English literature across genre and historical period | English literature across genre and historical period | writing | writing | relationships between literary themes | forms | and conventions | relationships between literary themes | forms | and conventions | Renaissance lyrics | Enlightenment satire | and modernist short stories | Renaissance lyrics | Enlightenment satire | and modernist short stories

License

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples. This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | women authors | comfort women | comfort women | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | slave novel | slave novel | sensationalism | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | sentimentalism | realism | realism | postmodern fiction | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | American Revolution | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | Puritanism | SP.517 | SP.517 | WMN.517 | WMN.517

License

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips. This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.630J Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies (MIT) 21M.630J Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies (MIT)

Description

This class is an interdisciplinary survey that explores the experiences of people of African descent through the overlapping approaches of history, literature, anthropology, legal studies, media studies, performance, linguistics, and creative writing. It connects the experiences of African Americans and of other American minorities, focusing on social, political, and cultural histories, and on linguistic patterns. Activities include lectures, discussions, workshops, and required field trips that involve minimal cost to students. This class is an interdisciplinary survey that explores the experiences of people of African descent through the overlapping approaches of history, literature, anthropology, legal studies, media studies, performance, linguistics, and creative writing. It connects the experiences of African Americans and of other American minorities, focusing on social, political, and cultural histories, and on linguistic patterns. Activities include lectures, discussions, workshops, and required field trips that involve minimal cost to students.

Subjects

21M.630 | 21M.630 | 21A.114 | 21A.114 | 21H.106 | 21H.106 | 21L.008 | 21L.008 | 21W.741 | 21W.741 | 24.912 | 24.912 | black studies | black studies | New York City | New York City | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | multimedia | multimedia | drama | drama | dance | dance | fiction | fiction | poetry | poetry | documentary | documentary | visual art | visual art | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Black Panther Party | Black Panther Party | racism | racism | slavery | slavery | Black Arts | Black Arts | Black Power | Black Power | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | segregation | segregation | Boston | Boston

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Faust | Liszt | Liszt | Berlioz | Berlioz | Murnau | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | Turn of the Screw | magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.220 Early Music (MIT) 21M.220 Early Music (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines European music from the early Middle Ages until the end of the Renaissance. It includes a chronological survey and intensive study of three topics: chant and its development, music in Italy 1340-1420, and music in Elizabethan England. Instruction focuses on methods and pitfalls in studying music of the distant past. Students' papers, problem sets, and presentations explore lives, genres, and works in depth. Works are studied in facsimile of original notation, and from original manuscripts at MIT, where possible. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines European music from the early Middle Ages until the end of the Renaissance. It includes a chronological survey and intensive study of three topics: chant and its development, music in Italy 1340-1420, and music in Elizabethan England. Instruction focuses on methods and pitfalls in studying music of the distant past. Students' papers, problem sets, and presentations explore lives, genres, and works in depth. Works are studied in facsimile of original notation, and from original manuscripts at MIT, where possible.

Subjects

musicology | musicology | music history | music history | music composition | music composition | medieval music | medieval music | church music | church music | chant | chant | Gregorian chant | Gregorian chant | religious music | religious music | liturgy | liturgy | monody | monody | polyphony | polyphony | Trecento | Trecento | Elizabethan London | Elizabethan London | motet | motet | madrigal | madrigal | Renaissance | Renaissance

License

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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT) 21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds. Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds.

Subjects

Age of Reason | Age of Reason | philosophy | philosophy | cultural history | cultural history | intellectual history | intellectual history | History | History | western tradition | western tradition | Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | 1600 | 1600 | 1850 | 1850 | natural sciences | natural sciences | mathematics | mathematics | social theorists | social theorists | institutional reformers | institutional reformers | political revolutionaries | political revolutionaries | change | change | themselves | themselves | society | society | trials | trials | art | art | literature | literature | theater | theater | music | music | politics | politics | culture | culture | evolution | evolution | revolution. | revolution.

License

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