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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Taylor on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective Taylor on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective

Description

Stephanie Taylor speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010. Stephanie Taylor speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010.

Subjects

theory | theory | space | space | gender | gender | feminist | feminist | transformation | transformation | place | place | prison | prison | penal | penal | punishment | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | post-Soviet Russia | geography | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Shabazz on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective Shabazz on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective

Description

Rashad Shabazz speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010. Rashad Shabazz speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010.

Subjects

theory | theory | space | space | gender | gender | feminist | feminist | transformation | transformation | place | place | prison | prison | penal | penal | punishment | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | post-Soviet Russia | geography | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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McAuley on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective McAuley on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective

Description

Mary McAuley speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010. Mary McAuley speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010.

Subjects

theory | theory | space | space | gender | gender | feminist | feminist | transformation | transformation | place | place | prison | prison | penal | penal | punishment | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | post-Soviet Russia | geography | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Hutchings on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective Hutchings on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective

Description

Stephen Hutchings speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010. Stephen Hutchings speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010.

Subjects

theory | theory | space | space | gender | gender | feminist | feminist | transformation | transformation | place | place | prison | prison | penal | penal | punishment | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | post-Soviet Russia | geography | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Hall on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective Hall on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective

Description

Alex Hall speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010. Alex Hall speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010.

Subjects

theory | theory | space | space | gender | gender | feminist | feminist | transformation | transformation | place | place | prison | prison | penal | penal | punishment | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | post-Soviet Russia | geography | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Codd on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective Codd on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective

Description

Helen Codd speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010. Helen Codd speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010.

Subjects

theory | theory | space | space | gender | gender | feminist | feminist | transformation | transformation | place | place | prison | prison | penal | penal | punishment | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | post-Soviet Russia | geography | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Armstrong on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective Armstrong on Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective

Description

Sarah Armstrong speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010. Sarah Armstrong speaks at the Gender, Geography and Punishment in Comparative Perspective workshop hosted by the Centre for Criminology and School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, on the 22-23 June 2010.

Subjects

theory | theory | space | space | gender | gender | feminist | feminist | transformation | transformation | place | place | prison | prison | penal | penal | punishment | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | post-Soviet Russia | geography | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography | theory | space | gender | feminist | transformation | place | prison | penal | punishment | post-Soviet Russia | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Challenging charisma: constructing grievance and the limits of legitimacy in post-Crimea Russia

Description

Samuel Greene talks about outbreak of protests in Russia and political events after the annexation of Crimea Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Russia | post-Soviet Russia | ukraine | putin | Russia | post-Soviet Russia | ukraine | putin | 2016-01-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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THEMIS: Citizens of Kazakhstan in a Russian city: factors facilitating and limiting transnational activities (the case of Novosibirsk)

Description

Larisa Kosygina presents her paper 'Citizens of Kazakhstan in a Russian city: factors facilitating and limiting transnational activities' in Parallel session VI(C) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 This paper discusses some results of my research, “Foreign citizens in the Novosibirsk region: factors for construction of transnational practices,” undertaken within the collective research project, “Cross-border relations in the Asian part of Russia: a comprehensive assessment of benefits and risks" (funded by the Russian Academy of Science). The paper is based on an analysis of semi-structured interviews with citizens of Kazakhstan residing in Novosibirsk, which is the principal city of the region bordering Kazakhstan. It presents

Subjects

THEMIS | migration | Russia | kazakhstan | Transnational | THEMIS | migration | Russia | kazakhstan | Transnational | 2013-09-26

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | early modern | Russia | history | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | international relations | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | society | Asia | foreign influences | foreign relations | Russian history | social relations | nobility | peasantry | town | country | women | men | political | religious | economic | social factors | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | government | time of troubles | seventeenth century | 17th century | eighteenth century | 18th century | politics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | early modern | Russia | history | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | international relations | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | society | Asia | foreign influences | foreign relations | Russian history | social relations | nobility | peasantry | town | country | women | men | political | religious | economic | social factors | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | government | time of troubles | seventeenth century | 17th century | eighteenth century | 18th century | politics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Windows on war : Soviet posters 1943-1945 Windows on war : Soviet posters 1943-1945

Description

See the largest collection of Russian WWII propaganda posters outside the former Soviet Union in this video with Professor Cynthia Marsh April 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor Cynthia Marsh, Professor of Russian Drama and Literature, Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies Professor Cynthia Marsh began the study of Russian after leaving school, by taking an intensive course to A-level at the then Holborn College of Law, Languages and Commerce, in Central London. She then went on to gain BA hons Russian (first class) at the University of Nottingham and spent a year at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London, completing an MA Area Studies: Russia, before going on to full time research there on the relationship betw See the largest collection of Russian WWII propaganda posters outside the former Soviet Union in this video with Professor Cynthia Marsh April 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor Cynthia Marsh, Professor of Russian Drama and Literature, Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies Professor Cynthia Marsh began the study of Russian after leaving school, by taking an intensive course to A-level at the then Holborn College of Law, Languages and Commerce, in Central London. She then went on to gain BA hons Russian (first class) at the University of Nottingham and spent a year at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London, completing an MA Area Studies: Russia, before going on to full time research there on the relationship betw

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Posters | Posters | Russia | Russia | World War 2 | World War 2 | Soviet Union | Soviet Union | Propaganda | Propaganda | Patriotism | Patriotism | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Volodin’s Duma: Do Volodin’s reforms go much beyond symbolic PR? Volodin’s Duma: Do Volodin’s reforms go much beyond symbolic PR?

Description

Vyacheslav Volodin has big plans for the State Duma. Since his October 5 election, the new chairman of the Federal Assembly’s lower chamber has directed a raft of changes aimed, it seems, at improving the Duma’s political stature. These reforms touch on all the core functions of legislatures: representation and linkage; executive oversight and control; and policy-making. The past proliferation of derogatory monikers like “rubber stamp,” “rabid printer,” and legal “conveyor” belt reflect the popular perception that the contemporary Russian federal legislature is an ineffectual institution – a body stuffed with inactive deputies, whose task is simply to distract citizens from real decision-making processes. ... Vyacheslav Volodin has big plans for the State Duma. Since his October 5 election, the new chairman of the Federal Assembly’s lower chamber has directed a raft of changes aimed, it seems, at improving the Duma’s political stature. These reforms touch on all the core functions of legislatures: representation and linkage; executive oversight and control; and policy-making. The past proliferation of derogatory monikers like “rubber stamp,” “rabid printer,” and legal “conveyor” belt reflect the popular perception that the contemporary Russian federal legislature is an ineffectual institution – a body stuffed with inactive deputies, whose task is simply to distract citizens from real decision-making processes. ...

Subjects

Duma | Duma | Putin | Putin | Russia | Russia

License

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SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT) SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT)

Description

This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language. This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language.

Subjects

translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture | translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s outback

Description

Ben Judah, author of 'Fragile Empire: How Russia Fell In And Out Of Love with Vladimir Putin', gives a talk for the Reuters Schoolf of Journalism seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

putin | media | greenpeace | journalism | reuters | politics | Russia | putin | media | greenpeace | journalism | reuters | politics | Russia | 2013-10-30

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT) 21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction. This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | history | silk road | silk road | China | China | Russia | Russia | Central Eurasia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | mongolia | turkey | turkey | religion | religion | trade | trade | war | war | tradition | tradition | culture | culture | soviet union | soviet union | islam | islam | buddhism | buddhism | christianity | christianity | confucianism | confucianism | marco polo | marco polo | rabban sauma | rabban sauma | film | film | travelogue | travelogue | music | music | empire | empire | nomad | nomad | conquest | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Can TV make history?

Description

Norma Percy, Documentary film making and producer gives a talk for thw Reuters Institute Seminar Series. Note: Clips of documentaries have been edited out to avoid copyright infringement. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Bill Clinton | journalism | Russia | Yugoslavia | Tony Blair | politics | iraq | documentary | war | Bill Clinton | journalism | Russia | Yugoslavia | Tony Blair | politics | iraq | documentary | war | 2012-01-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Russia is Back: Jenifer Hart Memorial Lecture

Description

Professor MacFarlane gives a talk about modern Russia; from the fall of the Berlin Wall to today; including the rise of Vladimir Putin, the conflict between Chechnya, alleged human rights violations and Russia's relationship with the rest of the world. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | society | alumni | Russia | Chechnya | politics | society | alumni | Russia | Chechnya | 2009-09-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Six things you need to know about the recent Russian parliamentary elections Six things you need to know about the recent Russian parliamentary elections

Description

On Sept. 18, Russians went to the polls to elect the State Duma — the lower chamber of the bicameral Federal Assembly. In an earlier post, I set out what to expect from the vote. In this post, I discuss what to make of the results. The first session of the Duma’s seventh convocation will take place Wednesday. Here are six things you need to know. 1) United Russia, the pro-Putin “party of power,” won a supermajority.  United Russia (UR) will take 344 out of 450 Duma seats. UR candidates secured pluralities in 203 of the 225 single-mandate races. The party also ... On Sept. 18, Russians went to the polls to elect the State Duma — the lower chamber of the bicameral Federal Assembly. In an earlier post, I set out what to expect from the vote. In this post, I discuss what to make of the results. The first session of the Duma’s seventh convocation will take place Wednesday. Here are six things you need to know. 1) United Russia, the pro-Putin “party of power,” won a supermajority.  United Russia (UR) will take 344 out of 450 Duma seats. UR candidates secured pluralities in 203 of the 225 single-mandate races. The party also ...

Subjects

Duma | Duma | Elections | Elections | Putin | Putin | Russia | Russia

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT) 21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction. This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | history | silk road | silk road | China | China | Russia | Russia | Central Eurasia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | mongolia | turkey | turkey | religion | religion | trade | trade | war | war | tradition | tradition | culture | culture | soviet union | soviet union | islam | islam | buddhism | buddhism | christianity | christianity | confucianism | confucianism | marco polo | marco polo | rabban sauma | rabban sauma | film | film | travelogue | travelogue | music | music | empire | empire | nomad | nomad | conquest | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Kompromat or not, Russia already has a winner in Trump Kompromat or not, Russia already has a winner in Trump

Description

By all accounts the relationship between President Donald Trump and the Kremlin holds the makings of a dark, Hollywood thriller. Trump is a US President at war with his own intelligence agencies, whilst denying ? only to later admit ? Russian interference in the election. Freshly inaugurated, he already faces comparisons to a modern-day Manchurian Candidate, referring to the 1959 novel about a brainwashed president controlled by sinister, external forces. But how fair is this? And do we really know what the Russians are up to? As a political scientist, my research examines the tools of contemporary warfare and influence ... By all accounts the relationship between President Donald Trump and the Kremlin holds the makings of a dark, Hollywood thriller. Trump is a US President at war with his own intelligence agencies, whilst denying ? only to later admit ? Russian interference in the election. Freshly inaugurated, he already faces comparisons to a modern-day Manchurian Candidate, referring to the 1959 novel about a brainwashed president controlled by sinister, external forces. But how fair is this? And do we really know what the Russians are up to? As a political scientist, my research examines the tools of contemporary warfare and influence ...

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | International Relations | International Relations | US Politics | US Politics | 2016 Elections | 2016 Elections | Donald Trump | Donald Trump | Espionage | Espionage | Russia | Russia

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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21H.245J Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, 1917 to the Present (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and historical evolution of the Soviet state and society from the 1917 Revolution to the present. It covers the creation of a revolutionary regime, causes and nature of the Stalin revolution, post-Stalinist efforts to achieve political and social reform, and causes of the Soviet collapse. It also examines current developments in Russia in light of Soviet history.

Subjects

21H.245 | 17.57 | 21G.086 | Soviet Union | politics | society | Vladimir Putin | Imperial Russia | Russian Revolution | New Economic Policy | Gorbachev | Yeltsin | Lenin | Pobedonostsev | Marxism | October Manifesto | World War I | February Revolution | Romanov dynasty | Bolsheviks | Trotsky | October Revolution | Civil War | Red Army | Communism | Stalin | collectivization | industrialization | Gulag | Molotov-Ribbentrop pact | World War II | Novikov telegram | Khrushchev | Brezhnev | Alena Ledeneva | Putin | Kremlin | Medvedev | Ukraine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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