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6.844 Computability Theory of and with Scheme (MIT) 6.844 Computability Theory of and with Scheme (MIT)

Description

6.844 is a graduate introduction to programming theory, logic of programming, and computability, with the programming language Scheme used to crystallize computability constructions and as an object of study itself. Topics covered include: programming and computability theory based on a term-rewriting, "substitution" model of computation by Scheme programs with side-effects; computation as algebraic manipulation: Scheme evaluation as algebraic manipulation and term rewriting theory; paradoxes from self-application and introduction to formal programming semantics; undecidability of the Halting Problem for Scheme; properties of recursively enumerable sets, leading to Incompleteness Theorems for Scheme equivalences; logic for program specification and verification; and Hilbert's Tenth Prob 6.844 is a graduate introduction to programming theory, logic of programming, and computability, with the programming language Scheme used to crystallize computability constructions and as an object of study itself. Topics covered include: programming and computability theory based on a term-rewriting, "substitution" model of computation by Scheme programs with side-effects; computation as algebraic manipulation: Scheme evaluation as algebraic manipulation and term rewriting theory; paradoxes from self-application and introduction to formal programming semantics; undecidability of the Halting Problem for Scheme; properties of recursively enumerable sets, leading to Incompleteness Theorems for Scheme equivalences; logic for program specification and verification; and Hilbert's Tenth Prob

Subjects

Scheme | Scheme | programming theory | programming theory | logic of programming | logic of programming | computability | computability | programming language | programming language | Scheme evaluation | Scheme evaluation | algebraic manipulation | algebraic manipulation | term rewriting theory | term rewriting theory | programming semantics | programming semantics | Halting Problem for Scheme | Halting Problem for Scheme | Incompleteness Theorems | Incompleteness Theorems | Hilbert's Tenth Problem | Hilbert's Tenth Problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT) 18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods. This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.

Subjects

Linear systems | Linear systems | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | Wave equation | Wave equation | Von Neumann analysis | Von Neumann analysis | Conditions for stability | Conditions for stability | Dissipation | Dissipation | Multistep schemes | Multistep schemes | Dispersion | Dispersion | Group Velocity | Group Velocity | Propagation of Wave Packets | Propagation of Wave Packets | Parabolic Equations | Parabolic Equations | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | Convection-Diffusion equation | Convection-Diffusion equation | ADI Methods | ADI Methods | Elliptic Equations | Elliptic Equations | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | ODEs | ODEs | finite differences | finite differences | spectral methods | spectral methods | well-posedness and stability | well-posedness and stability | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | Finite Difference Schemes | Finite Difference Schemes | Partial Differential Equations | Partial Differential Equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT) 18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.

Subjects

Linear systems | Linear systems | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | Wave equation | Wave equation | Von Neumann analysis | Von Neumann analysis | Conditions for stability | Conditions for stability | Dissipation | Dissipation | Multistep schemes | Multistep schemes | Dispersion | Dispersion | Group Velocity | Group Velocity | Propagation of Wave Packets | Propagation of Wave Packets | Parabolic Equations | Parabolic Equations | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | Convection-Diffusion equation | Convection-Diffusion equation | ADI Methods | ADI Methods | Elliptic Equations | Elliptic Equations | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | ODEs | ODEs | finite differences | finite differences | spectral methods | spectral methods | well-posedness and stability | well-posedness and stability | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | Finite Difference Schemes | Finite Difference Schemes | Partial Differential Equations | Partial Differential Equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.821 Programming Languages (MIT) 6.821 Programming Languages (MIT)

Description

6.821 teaches the principles of functional, imperative, and logic programming languages. Topics covered include: meta-circular interpreters, semantics (operational and denotational), type systems (polymorphism, inference, and abstract types), object oriented programming, modules, and multiprocessing. The course involves substantial programming assignments and problem sets as well as a significant amount of reading. The course uses the Scheme+ programming language for all of its assignments. 6.821 teaches the principles of functional, imperative, and logic programming languages. Topics covered include: meta-circular interpreters, semantics (operational and denotational), type systems (polymorphism, inference, and abstract types), object oriented programming, modules, and multiprocessing. The course involves substantial programming assignments and problem sets as well as a significant amount of reading. The course uses the Scheme+ programming language for all of its assignments.

Subjects

Scheme | Scheme | Scheme+ | Scheme+ | programming | programming | programming language | programming language | functional programming language | functional programming language | imperative programming language | imperative programming language | ogic programming languages | ogic programming languages | meta-circular interpreters | meta-circular interpreters | operational semantics | operational semantics | denotational semantics | denotational semantics | type systems | type systems | polymorphism | polymorphism | inference | inference | abstract types | abstract types | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | modules | modules | multiprocessing | multiprocessing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.844 Computability Theory of and with Scheme (MIT)

Description

6.844 is a graduate introduction to programming theory, logic of programming, and computability, with the programming language Scheme used to crystallize computability constructions and as an object of study itself. Topics covered include: programming and computability theory based on a term-rewriting, "substitution" model of computation by Scheme programs with side-effects; computation as algebraic manipulation: Scheme evaluation as algebraic manipulation and term rewriting theory; paradoxes from self-application and introduction to formal programming semantics; undecidability of the Halting Problem for Scheme; properties of recursively enumerable sets, leading to Incompleteness Theorems for Scheme equivalences; logic for program specification and verification; and Hilbert's Tenth Prob

Subjects

Scheme | programming theory | logic of programming | computability | programming language | Scheme evaluation | algebraic manipulation | term rewriting theory | programming semantics | Halting Problem for Scheme | Incompleteness Theorems | Hilbert's Tenth Problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT) 6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsScheme software is required to run the .scm files found on this course site. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsScheme software is required to run the .scm files found on this course site.

Subjects

programming | programming | Scheme | Scheme | abstraction | abstraction | recursion | recursion | iteration | iteration | object oriented | object oriented | structure | structure | interpretation | interpretation | computer programs | computer programs | languages | languages | procedures | procedures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.821 Programming Languages (MIT)

Description

6.821 teaches the principles of functional, imperative, and logic programming languages. Topics covered include: meta-circular interpreters, semantics (operational and denotational), type systems (polymorphism, inference, and abstract types), object oriented programming, modules, and multiprocessing. The course involves substantial programming assignments and problem sets as well as a significant amount of reading. The course uses the Scheme+ programming language for all of its assignments.

Subjects

Scheme | Scheme+ | programming | programming language | functional programming language | imperative programming language | ogic programming languages | meta-circular interpreters | operational semantics | denotational semantics | type systems | polymorphism | inference | abstract types | object oriented programming | modules | multiprocessing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT) 6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

programming | programming | Scheme | Scheme | abstraction | abstraction | recursion | recursion | iteration | iteration | object oriented | object oriented | structure | structure | interpretation | interpretation | computer programs | computer programs | languages | languages | procedures | procedures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.945 Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming (MIT) 6.945 Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming (MIT)

Description

This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming assignments, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language. This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming assignments, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language.

Subjects

Scheme | Scheme | symbolic programming | symbolic programming | additive systems | additive systems | generic operations | generic operations | language layers | language layers | pattern-directed invocation | pattern-directed invocation | searching | searching | amb | amb | backtracking | backtracking | propagation systems | propagation systems | constraints | constraints | truth maintenance | truth maintenance | continuations | continuations | structure and interpretation of computer programs | structure and interpretation of computer programs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.

Subjects

Linear systems | Fast Fourier Transform | Wave equation | Von Neumann analysis | Conditions for stability | Dissipation | Multistep schemes | Dispersion | Group Velocity | Propagation of Wave Packets | Parabolic Equations | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | Convection-Diffusion equation | ADI Methods | Elliptic Equations | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | ODEs | finite differences | spectral methods | well-posedness and stability | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | Finite Difference Schemes | Partial Differential Equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.

Subjects

Linear systems | Fast Fourier Transform | Wave equation | Von Neumann analysis | Conditions for stability | Dissipation | Multistep schemes | Dispersion | Group Velocity | Propagation of Wave Packets | Parabolic Equations | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | Convection-Diffusion equation | ADI Methods | Elliptic Equations | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | ODEs | finite differences | spectral methods | well-posedness and stability | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | Finite Difference Schemes | Partial Differential Equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ambush marketing and the Games

Description

?ambush marketing?, where organisations attempt to promote themselves as official sponsors, when they are not.

Subjects

UKOER OER TOP Partner Scheme Ambush marketing Impact of social media

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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6.945 Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming (MIT)

Description

This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming assignments, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language.

Subjects

Scheme | symbolic programming | additive systems | generic operations | language layers | pattern-directed invocation | searching | amb | backtracking | propagation systems | constraints | truth maintenance | continuations | structure and interpretation of computer programs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsScheme software is required to run the .scm files found on this course site.

Subjects

programming | Scheme | abstraction | recursion | iteration | object oriented | structure | interpretation | computer programs | languages | procedures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ambush marketing and the Games

Description

“ambush marketing”, where organisations attempt to promote themselves as official sponsors, when they are not.

Subjects

UKOER OER TOP Partner Scheme Ambush marketing Impact of social media

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

programming | Scheme | abstraction | recursion | iteration | object oriented | structure | interpretation | computer programs | languages | procedures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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