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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT) 17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After

Subjects

Political science | Political science | fundamental ideas | fundamental ideas | theories | theories | methods | methods | contemporary | contemporary | major books | major books | articles | articles | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | American | American | comparative politics | comparative politics | Rawls | Rawls | A Theory of Justice | A Theory of Justice | Hayek | Hayek | The Constitution of Liberty | The Constitution of Liberty | Arrow | Arrow | Social Choice and Individual Values | Social Choice and Individual Values | Olson | Olson | The Logic of Collective Action | The Logic of Collective Action | Waltz | Waltz | Theory of International Relations | Theory of International Relations | Bull | Bull | The Anarchical Society | The Anarchical Society | Foucault | Foucault | Discipline and Punish | Discipline and Punish | Elster | Elster | Cement of Society | Cement of Society | Keohane | Keohane | After Hegemony | After Hegemony | Allison | Allison | Zelikow | Zelikow | The Essence of Decision | The Essence of Decision | Doyle | Doyle | Kant | Kant | Liberal Legacies | Liberal Legacies | Foreign Affairs | Foreign Affairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Four Lessons from Brexit and its Fallout Four Lessons from Brexit and its Fallout

Description

There is no shortage of lessons to be learned from Brexit and its fallout – for politicians, businesses and the public alike. For strategists, analysts and advisors, these past few weeks have provided a host of examples of both good and bad practice. Surveying recent events, four take-aways stand out: 1) Forecast, don’t predict No one predicted this. Nor did the polls or the betting markets. Even the leaders of the Leave campaign did not predict Brexit. More than this, though, no one predicted that within weeks of a vote all of the Leave campaign’s victorious leaders would have resigned ... There is no shortage of lessons to be learned from Brexit and its fallout – for politicians, businesses and the public alike. For strategists, analysts and advisors, these past few weeks have provided a host of examples of both good and bad practice. Surveying recent events, four take-aways stand out: 1) Forecast, don’t predict No one predicted this. Nor did the polls or the betting markets. Even the leaders of the Leave campaign did not predict Brexit. More than this, though, no one predicted that within weeks of a vote all of the Leave campaign’s victorious leaders would have resigned ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | International Institutions | International Institutions | brexit | brexit

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This subject, required of all first-year PhD students in political science, introduces fundamental ideas, theories, and methods in contemporary political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that are intrinsically good and have been influential in the field. The first semester focuses principally on issues of political theory and international relations, while the second focuses principally on American and comparative politics. Readings in the fall semester from Rawls, A Theory of Justice; Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty; Arrow Social Choice and Individual Values; Olson, The Logic of Collective Action; Waltz, Theory of International Relations; Bull, The Anarchical Society; Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Elster, Cement of Society; Keohane, After

Subjects

Political science | fundamental ideas | theories | methods | contemporary | major books | articles | political theory | international relations | American | comparative politics | Rawls | A Theory of Justice | Hayek | The Constitution of Liberty | Arrow | Social Choice and Individual Values | Olson | The Logic of Collective Action | Waltz | Theory of International Relations | Bull | The Anarchical Society | Foucault | Discipline and Punish | Elster | Cement of Society | Keohane | After Hegemony | Allison | Zelikow | The Essence of Decision | Doyle | Kant | Liberal Legacies | Foreign Affairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Oxford Philosophical Society and the Royal Society: a meeting of minds?

Description

Dr Anna Marie Roos gives a talk as part of the Museum's celebration of the 35th anniversary of the Royal Society. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

museums | museum history of science | philosophy | oxford | Royal Society | museums | museum history of science | philosophy | oxford | Royal Society

License

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Romania may have the most to lose from Moldova’s presidential election Romania may have the most to lose from Moldova’s presidential election

Description

Moldova is due to hold presidential elections on 30 October. Alexandru Damian examines what the implications of the election may be for Romania, which has previously expressed support for the current Moldovan government. He suggests that with the government’s preferred candidate facing a challenge to make the second round of the contest, supporting Maia Sandu from the Action and Solidarity party may represent the best option for promoting reform in the country. Shaken by political and economic instability, and divided between pro-Russian and pro-European positions, Moldova is presently awaiting critical presidential elections on 30 October which will help shape the country’s future ... Moldova is due to hold presidential elections on 30 October. Alexandru Damian examines what the implications of the election may be for Romania, which has previously expressed support for the current Moldovan government. He suggests that with the government’s preferred candidate facing a challenge to make the second round of the contest, supporting Maia Sandu from the Action and Solidarity party may represent the best option for promoting reform in the country. Shaken by political and economic instability, and divided between pro-Russian and pro-European positions, Moldova is presently awaiting critical presidential elections on 30 October which will help shape the country’s future ...

Subjects

European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | EU | EU | Moldova | Moldova | Romania | Romania

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his Collection at the Taylor Institution

Description

A collaborative venture between the University of Oxford's Edgar Wind Society and the Taylor Institution Library, this lecture discusses Sir Robert Taylor and his collection of architectural books & included a display of selected items from the collection Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

taylor institution | Edgar Wind Society | History of Art | architecture | books | scamozzi | piranesi | library | architect | sir robert taylor | taylor institution | Edgar Wind Society | History of Art | architecture | books | scamozzi | piranesi | library | architect | sir robert taylor | 2014-04-30

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? what do we mean? ? what do we mean?

Description

?National Interest? has entered the lexicon as a phrase that implies a realist approach to International Relations. It carries an assumption that is it possible to define the national as a melding and cohering of all interests, including business, sectoral, regional, and religious, within a country. When politicians use the phrase National Interest they seek to convey a message about the importance of what they are saying. It is a term deployed to allude to grand ideas and strategies and to conjure up an image of national power, rather than to illuminate what is actually going on in the foreign ... ?National Interest? has entered the lexicon as a phrase that implies a realist approach to International Relations. It carries an assumption that is it possible to define the national as a melding and cohering of all interests, including business, sectoral, regional, and religious, within a country. When politicians use the phrase National Interest they seek to convey a message about the importance of what they are saying. It is a term deployed to allude to grand ideas and strategies and to conjure up an image of national power, rather than to illuminate what is actually going on in the foreign ...

Subjects

European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | EU | EU | national interest | national interest | Theresa May | Theresa May | United Kingdom | United Kingdom

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s unfinished revolution? An interview with Hordur Torfason s unfinished revolution? An interview with Hordur Torfason

Description

In this Q&A, I discuss the prospects for 'unfreezing' the draft new constitution with Hordur Torfason, the award-winning human rights activist credited with starting Iceland's 'pots and pans revolution'. Question: You’re credited as the person who started the “pots and pans revolution” in Iceland. How did the protests start? Torfason: I’m 70 years old this year. I started becoming an activist around 20 years old. Not that I wanted to become an activist, not at all. But I’m gay and it tells you a story that I’m the first gay man in the history of Iceland who steps forward. When I was 30 years old I was very famous. Everybody knew my song. I was on television, radio, doing concerts, LPs. I was doing everything that a young man can dream of. I was close to be a star or In this Q&A, I discuss the prospects for 'unfreezing' the draft new constitution with Hordur Torfason, the award-winning human rights activist credited with starting Iceland's 'pots and pans revolution'. Question: You’re credited as the person who started the “pots and pans revolution” in Iceland. How did the protests start? Torfason: I’m 70 years old this year. I started becoming an activist around 20 years old. Not that I wanted to become an activist, not at all. But I’m gay and it tells you a story that I’m the first gay man in the history of Iceland who steps forward. When I was 30 years old I was very famous. Everybody knew my song. I was on television, radio, doing concerts, LPs. I was doing everything that a young man can dream of. I was close to be a star or

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | Great Charter Convention | Great Charter Convention | Law | Law | Political Economy | Political Economy | Q&A's | Q&A's

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21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT) 21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT)

Description

Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon

Subjects

Classical roman literature | Classical roman literature | Augustan rome | Augustan rome | Augustus caesar | Augustus caesar | Golden age | Golden age | Republic | Republic | Imperial | Imperial | Western europe | Western europe | Philosophy | Philosophy | Society | Society | Aesthetic | Aesthetic | Politics | Politics | Latin | Latin | History | History | Culture | Culture | Art | Art | Cultural context | Cultural context | Textuality | Textuality | Empire | Empire | Public | Public | Private | Private | Class | Class | Gender | Gender | Pleasure | Pleasure | Caesar | Caesar | Cicero | Cicero | Catullus | Catullus | Livy | Livy | Virgil | Virgil | Horace | Horace | Ovid | Ovid | Cassius Dio | Cassius Dio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine

Description

Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires. Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires.

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics, (2) Electoral Politics, (3) Interest Group Politics, and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part of the semester focuses on public policy, divided into seven major policy areas: (1) Social Policy, (2) Foreign Policy, (3) Defense Policy, (4) Energy Policy, (5) Science and Technology Policy, (6) Industrial Policy, and (7) Trade Policy. We will try to understand the ways in which the ac This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: (1) Party Politics, (2) Electoral Politics, (3) Interest Group Politics, and (4) Bureaucratic Politics. The second part of the semester focuses on public policy, divided into seven major policy areas: (1) Social Policy, (2) Foreign Policy, (3) Defense Policy, (4) Energy Policy, (5) Science and Technology Policy, (6) Industrial Policy, and (7) Trade Policy. We will try to understand the ways in which the ac

Subjects

Japan | Japan | History | History | Politics | Politics | Society | Society | Party Politics | Party Politics | Elec | Elec | Electoral Politics | Electoral Politics | Interest Group Politics | Interest Group Politics | Bureaucratic Politics | Bureaucratic Politics | Social Policy | Social Policy | Foreign Policy | Foreign Policy | Defense Policy | Defense Policy | Energy Policy | Energy Policy | Science and Technology Policy | Science and Technology Policy | Industrial Policy | Industrial Policy | Trade Policy | Trade Policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT) 21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT)

Description

Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon

Subjects

Classical roman literature | Classical roman literature | Augustan rome | Augustan rome | Augustus caesar | Augustus caesar | Golden age | Golden age | Republic | Republic | Imperial | Imperial | Western europe | Western europe | Philosophy | Philosophy | Society | Society | Aesthetic | Aesthetic | Politics | Politics | Latin | Latin | History | History | Culture | Culture | Art | Art | Cultural context | Cultural context | Textuality | Textuality | Empire | Empire | Public | Public | Private | Private | Class | Class | Gender | Gender | Pleasure | Pleasure | Caesar | Caesar | Cicero | Cicero | Catullus | Catullus | Livy | Livy | Virgil | Virgil | Horace | Horace | Ovid | Ovid | Cassius Dio | Cassius Dio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT) STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the changing roles, ethical conflicts, and public perceptions of science and scientists in American society from World War II to the present. The class examines specific historical episodes focusing on debates between scientists and the contextual factors influencing their opinions and decisions. Topics include the atomic bomb project, environmental controversies, the Challenger disaster, biomedical research, genetic engineering, use/misuse of human subjects, scientific misconduct, and whistleblowing. This course explores the changing roles, ethical conflicts, and public perceptions of science and scientists in American society from World War II to the present. The class examines specific historical episodes focusing on debates between scientists and the contextual factors influencing their opinions and decisions. Topics include the atomic bomb project, environmental controversies, the Challenger disaster, biomedical research, genetic engineering, use/misuse of human subjects, scientific misconduct, and whistleblowing.

Subjects

Science | Science | Technology | Technology | and Society | and Society | risk | risk | science | science | society | society | ethics | ethics | politics | politics | technology | technology | history | history | america | america | controversy | controversy | atomic | atomic | whistleblowing | whistleblowing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe

Description

Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | inequality | inequality | Redistribution | Redistribution

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Television Studies Television Studies

Description

The course ?Television Studies? is devoted to the main theories and analytical approaches to television from a variety of socio-cultural, historical, industrial, programming and creative perspectives. The course ?Television Studies? is devoted to the main theories and analytical approaches to television from a variety of socio-cultural, historical, industrial, programming and creative perspectives.

Subjects

Television | Television | Television Consumption | Television Consumption | Television Audiences | Television Audiences | Audiovisual Communication | Audiovisual Communication | National Identity | National Identity | Globalization | Globalization | Television Fandom | Television Fandom | Culture | Culture | Television History | Television History | Television Aesthetics | Television Aesthetics | Television Authorship | Television Authorship | 2014 | 2014 | n Audiovisual | n Audiovisual | Comunicacion Audiovisual y Publicidad | Comunicacion Audiovisual y Publicidad | Television Institutions | Television Institutions | Society | Society

License

CC BY-NC 4.0, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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test Brexit Buyers’ Remorse? Non, on ne bregrette rien test Brexit Buyers’ Remorse? Non, on ne bregrette rien

Description

The vote to leave the EU was an outcome which surprised most commentators, bookies, and even those who voted for the winning side. In the aftermath of the result, John Gray, a popular political theorist, wrote that ‘voters inflicted the biggest shock on the establishment since Churchill was ousted in 1945’. It is hard to think that he is wrong. The only social classes which predominately voted Remain were ABs (affluent and middle-class voters), whereas C1 C2 DE (lower middle-class and working-class) voters all delivered majorities for Leave. As I predicted on this blog in January and contrary to many ... The vote to leave the EU was an outcome which surprised most commentators, bookies, and even those who voted for the winning side. In the aftermath of the result, John Gray, a popular political theorist, wrote that ‘voters inflicted the biggest shock on the establishment since Churchill was ousted in 1945’. It is hard to think that he is wrong. The only social classes which predominately voted Remain were ABs (affluent and middle-class voters), whereas C1 C2 DE (lower middle-class and working-class) voters all delivered majorities for Leave. As I predicted on this blog in January and contrary to many ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | Law | Law | Political Science | Political Science | Political Theory | Political Theory | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | brexit | brexit | European Union | European Union | Immigration | Immigration | UK Immigration | UK Immigration

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To be alive is to have hope To be alive is to have hope

Description

I traveled to the Calais migrant and refugee camp from March 14 to 16, together with a humanitarian student group from Brasenose College that collected donations and supplies to aid local NGOs with clothing and basic medical supplies. This article is based on my impressions of the camp and interviews with the migrants, refugees and NGO workers. The post To be alive is to have hope appeared first on OxPol. I traveled to the Calais migrant and refugee camp from March 14 to 16, together with a humanitarian student group from Brasenose College that collected donations and supplies to aid local NGOs with clothing and basic medical supplies. This article is based on my impressions of the camp and interviews with the migrants, refugees and NGO workers. The post To be alive is to have hope appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | Migration & Citizenship | Migration & Citizenship | Britain | Britain | Europe | Europe | France | France | Refugees | Refugees

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Exit, voice, and loyalty in Europe Exit, voice, and loyalty in Europe

Description

Complex situations often require us to take a step back for what consultants call the 10,000 feet view. The problems facing the EU these days—from Grexit to Brexit—surely seem impenetrable. A convoluted potpourri of economic, financial, and political crises leaves most observers either completely disengaged or increasingly reliant on their gut feelings. To wrap one's head around the forces that threaten the European project, it helps to think in very simple categories: exit, voice, and loyalty. Few theories still prompt real-life insights almost half a century after their publication. Albert O. Hirschman's "Exit, Voice, and Loyalty" surely falls into this category. Put simply, Hirschman postulated that members who are unsatisfied with an organization they are part of, can either ex Complex situations often require us to take a step back for what consultants call the 10,000 feet view. The problems facing the EU these days—from Grexit to Brexit—surely seem impenetrable. A convoluted potpourri of economic, financial, and political crises leaves most observers either completely disengaged or increasingly reliant on their gut feelings. To wrap one's head around the forces that threaten the European project, it helps to think in very simple categories: exit, voice, and loyalty. Few theories still prompt real-life insights almost half a century after their publication. Albert O. Hirschman's "Exit, Voice, and Loyalty" surely falls into this category. Put simply, Hirschman postulated that members who are unsatisfied with an organization they are part of, can either ex

Subjects

European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | International Relations | International Relations | Law | Law | Political Economy | Political Economy | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics

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Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate

Description

The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

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22.091 Nuclear Reactor Safety (MIT) 22.091 Nuclear Reactor Safety (MIT)

Description

Problems in nuclear engineering often involve applying knowledge from many disciplines simultaneously in achieving satisfactory solutions. The course will focus on understanding the complete nuclear reactor system including the balance of plant, support systems and resulting interdependencies affecting the overall safety of the plant and regulatory oversight. Both the Seabrook and Pilgrim nuclear plant simulators will be used as part of the educational experience to provide as realistic as possible understanding of nuclear power systems short of being at the reactor. Problems in nuclear engineering often involve applying knowledge from many disciplines simultaneously in achieving satisfactory solutions. The course will focus on understanding the complete nuclear reactor system including the balance of plant, support systems and resulting interdependencies affecting the overall safety of the plant and regulatory oversight. Both the Seabrook and Pilgrim nuclear plant simulators will be used as part of the educational experience to provide as realistic as possible understanding of nuclear power systems short of being at the reactor.

Subjects

nuclear | nuclear | reactor | reactor | safety | safety | dryout heat flux | dryout heat flux | preexisting hydrogen | preexisting hydrogen | blowdown gases | blowdown gases | downward propagation limit | downward propagation limit | debris dispersal | debris dispersal | direct containment heating | direct containment heating | gas blowthrough | gas blowthrough | seal table room | seal table room | subcompartment structures | subcompartment structures | compartmentalized geometries | compartmentalized geometries | overlying liquid layer | overlying liquid layer | preexisting atmosphere | preexisting atmosphere | blowdown time | blowdown time | melt generator | melt generator | detonation adiabatic | detonation adiabatic | thermohydraulic codes | thermohydraulic codes | hydrodynamic fragmentation | hydrodynamic fragmentation | vent clearing | vent clearing | combustion completeness | combustion completeness | containment pressurization | containment pressurization | melt retention | melt retention | containment loads | containment loads | melt ejection | melt ejection | containment geometry | containment geometry | hole ablation | hole ablation | Sandia National Laboratories | Sandia National Laboratories | Heat Transfer Conf | Heat Transfer Conf | Nuclear Regulatory Commission Report | Nuclear Regulatory Commission Report | Heat Mass Transfer | Heat Mass Transfer | The Combustion Institute | The Combustion Institute | Combustion Symposium International | Combustion Symposium International | New York | New York | Santa Barbara | Santa Barbara | Argonne National Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory | Fluid Mech | Fluid Mech | Zion Probabilistic Safety Study | Zion Probabilistic Safety Study | Los Angeles | Los Angeles | Impact of Hydrogen | Impact of Hydrogen | Topical Meeting | Topical Meeting | Water Reactor Safety | Water Reactor Safety | Water Trans | Water Trans | Academic Press All | Academic Press All | American Society of Mechanical Engineers | American Society of Mechanical Engineers | Specialists Meeting | Specialists Meeting | University of California | University of California | Brookhaven National Laboratory | Brookhaven National Laboratory | Calvert Cliffs | Calvert Cliffs | Fourth Int | Fourth Int | International Conference | International Conference | New Trends. | New Trends.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.017 Germany and its European Context (MIT) 21G.017 Germany and its European Context (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on main currents in contemporary German literary and visual culture. Taking Nietzsche's thought as a point of departure, students will survey the dialectics of tradition and modernity in both Germany and other European countries, particularly the UK, France, Denmark, and Poland. Primary works are drawn from literature, cinema, art, and performance, including works by Peter Sloterdijk, Thomas Vinterberg, and Michel Houellebecq. This course focuses on main currents in contemporary German literary and visual culture. Taking Nietzsche's thought as a point of departure, students will survey the dialectics of tradition and modernity in both Germany and other European countries, particularly the UK, France, Denmark, and Poland. Primary works are drawn from literature, cinema, art, and performance, including works by Peter Sloterdijk, Thomas Vinterberg, and Michel Houellebecq.

Subjects

Germany | Germany | European | European | Politics | Politics | Society | Society | Nietzsche | Nietzsche | United Kingdom | United Kingdom | France | France | Denmark | Denmark | Poland | Poland | Art | Art | Performance | Performance | Peter Sloterdijk | Peter Sloterdijk | Thomas Vinterberg | Thomas Vinterberg | Michel Houellebecq | Michel Houellebecq

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.714 Spanish for Bilingual Students (MIT) 21G.714 Spanish for Bilingual Students (MIT)

Description

Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested  in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills. Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested  in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills.

Subjects

Spanish; Language; Bilingual; Speak; Writing;Literature; Culture | Spanish; Language; Bilingual; Speak; Writing;Literature; Culture | History | History | Society | Society | Economics | Economics | Politics | Politics | Psychology | Psychology | Philosophy | Philosophy | Spanish | Spanish | Language | Language | Bilingual | Bilingual | Speak | Speak | Writing | Writing | Culture | Culture | Literature | Literature | Hispanic | Hispanic | oral grammar | oral grammar | written gramar | written gramar | fiction | fiction | poetry | poetry | Mexican-Americans | Mexican-Americans | Puerto Ricans | Puerto Ricans | Cubans | Cubans | heritage learners | heritage learners | Latino | Latino | immigration | immigration | identity | identity | ethnicity | ethnicity | education | education | vocabulary acquisition | vocabulary acquisition | media representation | media representation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.017 Germany and its European Context (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on main currents in contemporary German literary and visual culture. Taking Nietzsche's thought as a point of departure, students will survey the dialectics of tradition and modernity in both Germany and other European countries, particularly the UK, France, Denmark, and Poland. Primary works are drawn from literature, cinema, art, and performance, including works by Peter Sloterdijk, Thomas Vinterberg, and Michel Houellebecq.

Subjects

Germany | European | Politics | Society | Nietzsche | United Kingdom | France | Denmark | Poland | Art | Performance | Peter Sloterdijk | Thomas Vinterberg | Michel Houellebecq

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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