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Advances in nanotechnology Advances in nanotechnology

Description

Professor Moriarty is a researcher in the field of nanotechnology. Professor Moriarty is a researcher in the field of nanotechnology. In this podcast, Professor Moriarty discusses nanotechnology, and how it has led to a convergence of the traditional sciences. He talks about the commercial applications of nanotechnology such as hard disk technology in laptops, stain free materials and fabrics, self-cleaning windows and advanced water filtration. He also touches on some of the myths about nanotechnology as well as some of the real dangers of Nanotechnology and the steps governments are taking to regulate it. Professor Moriarty is a researcher in the field of nanotechnology. In this podcast, Professor Moriarty discusses nanotechnology, and how it has led to a convergence of the traditional sciences. He talks about the commercial applications of nanotechnology such as hard disk technology in laptops, stain free materials and fabrics, self-cleaning windows and advanced water filtration. He also touches on some of the myths about nanotechnology as well as some of the real dangers of Nanotechnology and the steps governments are taking to regulate it. Professor Moriarty is a researcher in the field of nanotechnology.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Podcast | Podcast | Audio | Audio | mp3 | mp3 | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Afferent and efferent nerves Afferent and efferent nerves

Description

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object compares and contrasts afferent and efferent nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham. As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object compares and contrasts afferent and efferent nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Histology | Histology | Cell biology | Cell biology | Nervous system | Nervous system | Somatic nerves | Somatic nerves | visceral nerves | visceral nerves

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Back-bench rebels Back-bench rebels

Description

Philip also discusses the issues behind the bank bench revolts, in particular highlighting that back bench rebellions are now at a post war high–ironically, as the new Labour government of 1997 was determined not to be a ‘split’ party like the previous Conservative government led by John Major. Philip also discusses the impact of the Tony Blair’s announcement that he will step down as leader of the Labour party, and whether this has affected the frequency of revolts. Philip also discusses the issues behind the bank bench revolts, in particular highlighting that back bench rebellions are now at a post war high–ironically, as the new Labour government of 1997 was determined not to be a ‘split’ party like the previous Conservative government led by John Major. Philip also discusses the impact of the Tony Blair’s announcement that he will step down as leader of the Labour party, and whether this has affected the frequency of revolts. Philip Cowley, Reader in the University’s School of Politics and International Relations, was recently nominated for the Times Higher young researcher of the year award. In this podcast, Philip discusses his research into back bench rebellions within the British parliament. Philip describes his research as practical politics, linking academic research to the real world of political debate. Since the British Labour party’s re-election with a reduced majority of 66 MPs in May 2005, some back bench Labour MPs have continued to vote against their own party, led by Prime Minister Tony Blair. This has forced the British government to make a series of concessions on a range of legislation. After the election, it was widely anticipated that Labour party MPs, with a reduced majority, would hav Philip Cowley, Reader in the University’s School of Politics and International Relations, was recently nominated for the Times Higher young researcher of the year award. In this podcast, Philip discusses his research into back bench rebellions within the British parliament. Philip describes his research as practical politics, linking academic research to the real world of political debate. Since the British Labour party’s re-election with a reduced majority of 66 MPs in May 2005, some back bench Labour MPs have continued to vote against their own party, led by Prime Minister Tony Blair. This has forced the British government to make a series of concessions on a range of legislation. After the election, it was widely anticipated that Labour party MPs, with a reduced majority, would hav

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Podcast | Podcast | Audio | Audio | mp3 | mp3 | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Beyond infinity Beyond infinity

Description

This popular maths talk gives an introduction to various different kinds of infinity, both countable and uncountable. These concepts are illustrated in a somewhat informal way using the notion of Hilbert's infinite hotel. In this talk, the hotel manager tries to fit various infinite collections of guests into the hotel. The students should learn that many apparently different types of infinity are really the same size. However, there are genuinely "more" real numbers than there are positive integers, as is shown in the more challenging final section, using Cantor's diagonalization argument. This popular maths talk gives an introduction to various different kinds of infinity, both countable and uncountable. These concepts are illustrated in a somewhat informal way using the notion of Hilbert's infinite hotel. In this talk, the hotel manager tries to fit various infinite collections of guests into the hotel. The students should learn that many apparently different types of infinity are really the same size. However, there are genuinely "more" real numbers than there are positive integers, as is shown in the more challenging final section, using Cantor's diagonalization argument.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Blood vessels Blood vessels

Description

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object explains and describes how the structure of a blood vessel is related to its function. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object explains and describes how the structure of a blood vessel is related to its function. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Histology | Histology | Cell | Cell | Biology | Biology | Blood | Blood | Vessels | Vessels | Arteries | Arteries | Veins | Veins | Capillaries | Capillaries

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Bone growth and repair Bone growth and repair

Description

Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham. Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham. Describes the growth of a long bone, and the process of bone fracture repair. Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham. Describes the growth of a long bone, and the process of bone fracture repair. Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Histology | Histology | Cell biology | Cell biology | Bone growth | Bone growth | Ossification | Ossification | fracture healing | fracture healing | osteoclasts | osteoclasts | osteoblasts | osteoblasts

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Brazilian Portuguese year 1 semester B Brazilian Portuguese year 1 semester B

Description

This module is aimed at students in year 1 semester B (beginners Portuguese). The varied exercises cover a range of topics from a solar eclipse to the Portuguese language. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand. This module is aimed at students in year 1 semester B (beginners Portuguese). The varied exercises cover a range of topics from a solar eclipse to the Portuguese language. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Brazilian Portuguese language | Brazilian Portuguese language | Reading | Reading | Listening | Listening | Grammar | Grammar | Vocabulary | Vocabulary | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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BURN - Biosciences Undergraduate Research at Nottingham BURN - Biosciences Undergraduate Research at Nottingham

Description

Dr Martin Luck is Associate Professor of Animal Physiology at the University of Nottingham. After reading Animal Physiology at Nottingham, he moved to the University of Leeds to complete a Masters in Steroid Endocrinology and a PhD in Physiology. He carried out post-doctoral research at the University of Southampton and then moved to Hamburg, Germany where he led a research group investigating ovarian follicular development. He returned to Nottingham as an academic in 1990. Dr Luck also has a BA in Mathematics, is a Fellow of the Society of Biology and the Higher Education Academy and is Chair of the Management Board of Bioscience Horizons, the National Undergraduate Research Journal. He has held teaching advisory posts at the University and been a consultant for the Quality Assurance Agen Dr Martin Luck is Associate Professor of Animal Physiology at the University of Nottingham. After reading Animal Physiology at Nottingham, he moved to the University of Leeds to complete a Masters in Steroid Endocrinology and a PhD in Physiology. He carried out post-doctoral research at the University of Southampton and then moved to Hamburg, Germany where he led a research group investigating ovarian follicular development. He returned to Nottingham as an academic in 1990. Dr Luck also has a BA in Mathematics, is a Fellow of the Society of Biology and the Higher Education Academy and is Chair of the Management Board of Bioscience Horizons, the National Undergraduate Research Journal. He has held teaching advisory posts at the University and been a consultant for the Quality Assurance Agen This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. Research produced 2006 - 2009. BURN brings final year undergraduate research work to public view in a professional and relevant way. The students represented here have risen to the challenges of doing rigorous research and presenting their work to a wider audience. Their articles show the distance they have travelled during their studies. They also demonstrate the inquiry and critical thinking skills that have been developed. As graduates, they will be able to exploit these valuable skills in their careers, whether they continue in science or whatever path they may choose. Suitable for undergraduate study Coordinated by Dr Martin Luck, School of Biosciences Dr Martin Luck is Associate Professor of Animal This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. Research produced 2006 - 2009. BURN brings final year undergraduate research work to public view in a professional and relevant way. The students represented here have risen to the challenges of doing rigorous research and presenting their work to a wider audience. Their articles show the distance they have travelled during their studies. They also demonstrate the inquiry and critical thinking skills that have been developed. As graduates, they will be able to exploit these valuable skills in their careers, whether they continue in science or whatever path they may choose. Suitable for undergraduate study Coordinated by Dr Martin Luck, School of Biosciences Dr Martin Luck is Associate Professor of Animal

Subjects

UNow | UNow | biosciences | biosciences | undergraduate research | undergraduate research | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Caistor dig Caistor dig

Description

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site. The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site. A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham. Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig. September 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jeras A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham. Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig. September 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jeras

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Archaeology | Archaeology | Roman History | Roman History | Roman Britain | Roman Britain | Burial Grounds | Burial Grounds | Roman Towns | Roman Towns | Archaeological Dig | Archaeological Dig | Venta Icenorum | Venta Icenorum | Caistor St Edmund | Caistor St Edmund | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Career skills in economics Career skills in economics

Description

Dr David Harvey has been a member of staff in the School of Economics since October 2003. He is a Reader in Econometrics. His research interests are in the area of time series econometrics, in particular tests for unit roots and structural change, forecast evaluation and applied time series analysis in general. He has published in journals such as the Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Econometrics Journal, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Forecasting, International Journal of Forecasting. Dr David Harvey has been a member of staff in the School of Economics since October 2003. He is a Reader in Econometrics. His research interests are in the area of time series econometrics, in particular tests for unit roots and structural change, forecast evaluation and applied time series analysis in general. He has published in journals such as the Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Econometrics Journal, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Forecasting, International Journal of Forecasting.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Career Skills | Career Skills | Nottingham Advantage Award | Nottingham Advantage Award | Personal Development | Personal Development | Career Path | Career Path | Employability Skills | Employability Skills

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Cell membranes and compartments Cell membranes and compartments

Description

Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham Outlines the proposed structure and properties of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells and identifies cell compartments that are separated from each other by at least one plasma membrane. Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham Outlines the proposed structure and properties of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells and identifies cell compartments that are separated from each other by at least one plasma membrane. Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Histology | Histology | Cell biology | Cell biology | membrane | membrane | phospholipid | phospholipid | organelles | organelles

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Challenging reality Challenging reality

Description

Outside of the University he is the author of ExplainingComputers.com and ExplainingTheFuture.com, as well as a regular contributor to the Morning Show on BBC Radio Nottingham and "The Night Before" on Kerrang! Radio. Outside of the University he is the author of ExplainingComputers.com and ExplainingTheFuture.com, as well as a regular contributor to the Morning Show on BBC Radio Nottingham and "The Night Before" on Kerrang! Radio. A behind the scenes interview with Professor Christopher Barnatt, Director and Producer of a new TV documentary on what we perceive to be real, and what, if any, future lies ahead for us. The TV documentary was televised in April 2009 and was based on a book written by Professor Christopher Barnatt in 1997, also entitled Challenging Reality, which focused on momentus change across history. The new television series developed this theme further, with input from numerous other experts at the University of Nottingham, across three episodes looking at human achievement, geography and communications and the individual and their role in society. April 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor Christopher Barnatt, Associate Professor Business School and Director A behind the scenes interview with Professor Christopher Barnatt, Director and Producer of a new TV documentary on what we perceive to be real, and what, if any, future lies ahead for us. The TV documentary was televised in April 2009 and was based on a book written by Professor Christopher Barnatt in 1997, also entitled Challenging Reality, which focused on momentus change across history. The new television series developed this theme further, with input from numerous other experts at the University of Nottingham, across three episodes looking at human achievement, geography and communications and the individual and their role in society. April 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor Christopher Barnatt, Associate Professor Business School and Director

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Change | Change | Change across history | Change across history | Historical Change | Historical Change | Change Management | Change Management | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Charles Darwin lectures at the University of Nottingham Charles Darwin lectures at the University of Nottingham

Description

As part of the University of Nottingham, School of Biology's 200 years of Darwin celebrations, Darwin — aka evolutionary geneticist Professor John Brookfield in full Victorian attire — outlines the ideas from his 1859 breakthrough publication The Origin of Species, which presented the theory of natural selection as the main driving force for evolution. Presentation delivered March 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor John Brookfield, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biology Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics As part of the University of Nottingham, School of Biology's 200 years of Darwin celebrations, Darwin — aka evolutionary geneticist Professor John Brookfield in full Victorian attire — outlines the ideas from his 1859 breakthrough publication The Origin of Species, which presented the theory of natural selection as the main driving force for evolution. Presentation delivered March 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor John Brookfield, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biology Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Evolution | Evolution | Science | Science | Biology | Biology | Genetics | Genetics | Darwin | Darwin | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Conservation and biodiversity Conservation and biodiversity

Description

In this podcast, Dr Field from the School of Geography compares and contrasts his experiences as a researcher in national parks in Honduras and Indonesia, and the different types of ecological communities he has studied, and goes on to introduce the emerging field of conservation bio-geography. In this podcast, Dr Field from the School of Geography compares and contrasts his experiences as a researcher in national parks in Honduras and Indonesia, and the different types of ecological communities he has studied, and goes on to introduce the emerging field of conservation bio-geography. Dr. Richard Field research interests lie in conservation, biodiversity and the forces that structure ecological communities. In this podcast, Dr Field from the School of Geography compares and contrasts his experiences as a researcher in national parks in Honduras and Indonesia, and the different types of ecological communities he has studied, and goes on to introduce the emerging field of conservation bio-geography. Dr. Richard Field research interests lie in conservation, biodiversity and the forces that structure ecological communities. In this podcast, Dr Field from the School of Geography compares and contrasts his experiences as a researcher in national parks in Honduras and Indonesia, and the different types of ecological communities he has studied, and goes on to introduce the emerging field of conservation bio-geography.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Consumer law Consumer law

Description

Peter is a member of the Financial Services Research Forum and of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Banking Regulation. He spent several years as a member of the UK Department of Trade of Trade and Industry’s Consumer Law Advisory Panel, and as Scientific Director of the European Credit Research Institute, Brussels. Peter has also served as Chair of the Society of Legal Scholars’ Consumer Law Panel Peter is a member of the Financial Services Research Forum and of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Banking Regulation. He spent several years as a member of the UK Department of Trade of Trade and Industry’s Consumer Law Advisory Panel, and as Scientific Director of the European Credit Research Institute, Brussels. Peter has also served as Chair of the Society of Legal Scholars’ Consumer Law Panel This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10 This module looks at the role of the law in regulating business in the interests of consumers. Suitable for: Second and final year undergraduates Professor P.R Cartwright, School of Law Peter Cartwright has been Professor of Consumer Protection Law at the University of Nottingham since 2004. He previously worked at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, where he obtained his Ph.D. Peter is the author of several books including Consumer Protection and the Criminal Law (2001) and Banks Consumers and Regulation (2004). The former won one of the Society of Legal Scholars’ prizes for outstanding legal scholarship by a scholar under the age of 40. Peter is a member of th This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10 This module looks at the role of the law in regulating business in the interests of consumers. Suitable for: Second and final year undergraduates Professor P.R Cartwright, School of Law Peter Cartwright has been Professor of Consumer Protection Law at the University of Nottingham since 2004. He previously worked at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, where he obtained his Ph.D. Peter is the author of several books including Consumer Protection and the Criminal Law (2001) and Banks Consumers and Regulation (2004). The former won one of the Society of Legal Scholars’ prizes for outstanding legal scholarship by a scholar under the age of 40. Peter is a member of th

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Consumer Law | Consumer Law | Regulation | Regulation | Consumer Protection | Consumer Protection | Business and Commercial Law | Business and Commercial Law | UKOER | UKOER

License

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Continental Portuguese intermediate semester B Continental Portuguese intermediate semester B

Description

This module is aimed at students in year 2 semester B. The varied exercises cover a range of topics from Portuguese history to cooking. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand. This module is aimed at students in year 2 semester B. The varied exercises cover a range of topics from Portuguese history to cooking. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network

Description

In this video author Patrick Gale shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Paul Sayer. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Patrick Gale, Author. Patrick Gale was born on the Isle of Wight in 1962, where his father was prison governor at Camp Hill prison. Later the family moved to London. He boarded at The Pilgrim's School, where he was a chorister, then went to Winchester College before reading English at Oxford University. He did a series of odd jobs to support his writing before becoming a full-time novelist, moving to Cornwall in 1987. He is the author of several novels, and also writes shor In this video author Patrick Gale shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Paul Sayer. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Patrick Gale, Author. Patrick Gale was born on the Isle of Wight in 1962, where his father was prison governor at Camp Hill prison. Later the family moved to London. He boarded at The Pilgrim's School, where he was a chorister, then went to Winchester College before reading English at Oxford University. He did a series of odd jobs to support his writing before becoming a full-time novelist, moving to Cornwall in 1987. He is the author of several novels, and also writes shor

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Mental Health | Mental Health | Literature | Literature | Fiction | Fiction | Madness | Madness | Nursing | Nursing | Creativity | Creativity | Representations of Madness | Representations of Madness | Health Humanities | Health Humanities | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network

Description

Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with Professor Ron Carter) and chair of the Health Language Research Group at the University of Nottingham, bringing together academics and clinicians to advance applied linguistics in health care settings. In 2008 he was awarded a Lord Dearing Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Crawford’s scholarship in the core areas of literature, linguisti Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with Professor Ron Carter) and chair of the Health Language Research Group at the University of Nottingham, bringing together academics and clinicians to advance applied linguistics in health care settings. In 2008 he was awarded a Lord Dearing Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Crawford’s scholarship in the core areas of literature, linguisti In this video Professor Paul Crawford presents the Madness & Literature Network's seminar on Mental Illness and Creativity, featuring the respected authors Patrick Gale and Paul Sayer. Presentation produced and delivered May 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor Paul Crawford, School of Midwifery & Physiotherapy Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with In this video Professor Paul Crawford presents the Madness & Literature Network's seminar on Mental Illness and Creativity, featuring the respected authors Patrick Gale and Paul Sayer. Presentation produced and delivered May 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor Paul Crawford, School of Midwifery & Physiotherapy Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Mental Health | Mental Health | Madness | Madness | Nursing | Nursing | Creativity | Creativity | Literature | Literature | Representations of Madness | Representations of Madness | Health Humanities | Health Humanities | Fiction | Fiction | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network

Description

You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this video as long as you credit the original author. The video is also available on YouTube You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this video as long as you credit the original author. The video is also available on YouTube In this video author Paul Sayer shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Patrick Gale. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Paul Sayer, Author. Paul Sayer is a former psychiatric nurse whose first novel The Comforts of Madness (1988) won the Constable Trophy, the Whitbread First Novel prize, and the Whitbread Book of the Year award. His five subsequent books include The Absolution Game (1992), Booker Prize 'long-listed', and Men in Rage (1999) published by Bloomsbury. His work has been translated into ten languages, and he has been the recipient of a number of scholarships, including a Society In this video author Paul Sayer shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Patrick Gale. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Paul Sayer, Author. Paul Sayer is a former psychiatric nurse whose first novel The Comforts of Madness (1988) won the Constable Trophy, the Whitbread First Novel prize, and the Whitbread Book of the Year award. His five subsequent books include The Absolution Game (1992), Booker Prize 'long-listed', and Men in Rage (1999) published by Bloomsbury. His work has been translated into ten languages, and he has been the recipient of a number of scholarships, including a Society

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Mental Health | Mental Health | Madness | Madness | Nursing | Nursing | Creativity | Creativity | Literature | Literature | Representations of Madness | Representations of Madness | Health Humanities | Health Humanities | Fiction | Fiction | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Darwin for a day Darwin for a day

Description

Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics, The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, North Carolina 1981-1983; Lecturer in Genetics, University of Leicester 1983-1986; Lecturer (1987), Reader (1997) and Professor of Evolutionary Genetics (2004) University of Nottingham. He was Managing Editor, Heredity (2000-2003). Vice-President (External Affairs), Genetics Society 2008-, Appointed Fellow of the Institute of Biology, 2009. Member RAE Biological Sciences Panel and Sub-Panel, 2001 and 2008. Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics, The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, North Carolina 1981-1983; Lecturer in Genetics, University of Leicester 1983-1986; Lecturer (1987), Reader (1997) and Professor of Evolutionary Genetics (2004) University of Nottingham. He was Managing Editor, Heredity (2000-2003). Vice-President (External Affairs), Genetics Society 2008-, Appointed Fellow of the Institute of Biology, 2009. Member RAE Biological Sciences Panel and Sub-Panel, 2001 and 2008. As part of the University of Nottingham, School of Biology's 200 years of Darwin celebrations, evolutionary geneticist Professor John Brookfield in full Victorian attire delivered a talk, as Darwin, on the theory of evolution via natural selection. In this video Professor John Brookfield is interviewed about his experience of being Darwin for a day Interview took place March 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor John Brookfield, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biology Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics, The Na As part of the University of Nottingham, School of Biology's 200 years of Darwin celebrations, evolutionary geneticist Professor John Brookfield in full Victorian attire delivered a talk, as Darwin, on the theory of evolution via natural selection. In this video Professor John Brookfield is interviewed about his experience of being Darwin for a day Interview took place March 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor John Brookfield, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biology Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics, The Na

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Evolution | Evolution | Science | Science | Biology | Biology | Genetics | Genetics | Darwin | Darwin | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Definitions, proofs and examples Definitions, proofs and examples

Description

•thinking up examples with specified combinations of properties •thinking up examples with specified combinations of properties During the academic year 2011-12, Dr Joel Feinstein gave five optional example classes to his second-year Mathematical Analysis students on Definitions, Proofs and Examples. Dr Feinstein recorded videos of these classes (presented here) to go along with his previous videos on 'How and why we do mathematical proofs'. These sessions are intended to reinforce material from lectures, while also providing more opportunities for students to hone their skills in a number of areas, including the following: •working with formal definitions •making deductions from information given •writing relatively routine proofs •investigating the properties of examples •thinking up examples with specified combinations of properties During the academic year 2011-12, Dr Joel Feinstein gave five optional example classes to his second-year Mathematical Analysis students on Definitions, Proofs and Examples. Dr Feinstein recorded videos of these classes (presented here) to go along with his previous videos on 'How and why we do mathematical proofs'. These sessions are intended to reinforce material from lectures, while also providing more opportunities for students to hone their skills in a number of areas, including the following: •working with formal definitions •making deductions from information given •writing relatively routine proofs •investigating the properties of examples •thinking up examples with specified combinations of properties

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Definitions | Definitions | Proofs | Proofs | examples | examples

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Depiction of terrorism in film and television Depiction of terrorism in film and television

Description

Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series’ as ‘24’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’ and how these common cultural experiences should not be underestimated as a factor in affecting the way public issues are viewed. Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series’ as ‘24’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’ and how these common cultural experiences should not be underestimated as a factor in affecting the way public issues are viewed. In this podcast, Professor Roberta Pearson from the School of American and Canadian Studies, discusses the fictional representation of terrorism in modern day television programmes and why more and more people are using fiction instead of the news to inform their opinions of world events. Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series’ as ‘24’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’ and how these common cultural experiences should not be underestimated as a factor in affecting the way public issues are viewed. In this podcast, Professor Roberta Pearson from the School of American and Canadian Studies, discusses the fictional representation of terrorism in modern day television programmes and why more and more people are using fiction instead of the news to inform their opinions of world events. Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series’ as ‘24’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’ and how these common cultural experiences should not be underestimated as a factor in affecting the way public issues are viewed.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Terrorism | Terrorism | Mass media | Mass media | Podcast | Podcast | Audio | Audio | mp3 | mp3 | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Designing political enquiry Designing political enquiry

Description

As taught Spring Semester 2011. The module is designed to allow students to develop a critical understanding of the methodological issues involved in designing and undertaking research in the discipline of politics and international relations and to strengthen their ability to read and evaluate political science literature more generally. The first part of the module focuses on issues of research design. It exposes students to a broad range of methodological issues involved in designing, conducting and writing up research based on a relative small number of cases in areas of comparative politics, international relations, political theory and public policy. Topics that are addressed in the module include issues involved in developing a research question, problems of conceptualisation, meas As taught Spring Semester 2011. The module is designed to allow students to develop a critical understanding of the methodological issues involved in designing and undertaking research in the discipline of politics and international relations and to strengthen their ability to read and evaluate political science literature more generally. The first part of the module focuses on issues of research design. It exposes students to a broad range of methodological issues involved in designing, conducting and writing up research based on a relative small number of cases in areas of comparative politics, international relations, political theory and public policy. Topics that are addressed in the module include issues involved in developing a research question, problems of conceptualisation, meas

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | M14320 | M14320 | M14321 | M14321

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Distance learning material Distance learning material

Description

The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to specialise in, depending upon their own particular interests. At present, 100 Students from a range of diverse backgrounds in numerous locations throughout the world are registered on these courses. Students use these materials as starting points to their study, and then interaction with tutors and fellow students is maintained via email, discussion boards and chat rooms. The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to specialise in, depending upon their own particular interests. At present, 100 Students from a range of diverse backgrounds in numerous locations throughout the world are registered on these courses. Students use these materials as starting points to their study, and then interaction with tutors and fellow students is maintained via email, discussion boards and chat rooms. The materials provided are taken from three postgraduate modules which students study as part of the School's distance learning MA degree programmes in 'Literary Linguistics', 'Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching' and 'Modern English Language'. Our courses generally consist of 10 units which cover the key areas of study within particular disciplines, in conjunction with material documenting the latest developments within each field. The 'Descriptive Linguistic Analysis' units are taken from the compulsory foundational module, enabling students to gain the core knowledge that they will need throughout their programme. The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to speciali The materials provided are taken from three postgraduate modules which students study as part of the School's distance learning MA degree programmes in 'Literary Linguistics', 'Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching' and 'Modern English Language'. Our courses generally consist of 10 units which cover the key areas of study within particular disciplines, in conjunction with material documenting the latest developments within each field. The 'Descriptive Linguistic Analysis' units are taken from the compulsory foundational module, enabling students to gain the core knowledge that they will need throughout their programme. The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to speciali

Subjects

UNow | UNow | U-now | U-now | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Document skills : maps and plans Document skills : maps and plans

Description

The resource includes a glossary and bibliography. Illustrative images of items from our collections appear throughout. The resource includes a glossary and bibliography. Illustrative images of items from our collections appear throughout. As a specialist medium, maps and plans can be a challenge to use and it is not always immediately obvious just what can be learned from them. This resource demonstrates how the researcher can use these documents to gain varied insights about a particular place and aspects of its history. The resource includes a glossary and bibliography. Illustrative images of items from our collections appear throughout. As a specialist medium, maps and plans can be a challenge to use and it is not always immediately obvious just what can be learned from them. This resource demonstrates how the researcher can use these documents to gain varied insights about a particular place and aspects of its history. The resource includes a glossary and bibliography. Illustrative images of items from our collections appear throughout.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Archives | Archives | Manuscripts | Manuscripts | Maps | Maps | Plans | Plans | Historical research | Historical research | Military maps | Military maps | County maps | County maps | Tithe maps | Tithe maps | Enclosure award maps | Enclosure award maps | Manuscript maps | Manuscript maps | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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