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Understanding contemporary society Understanding contemporary society

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. This module introduces students to a range of approaches in social analysis. Through introductions to key concepts, theorists and research studies in the disciplines of sociology, cultural studies and social policy, students will be equipped with the skills necessary for more advanced study of contemporary society. Two routes to reading this module's contents are offered. Those who prefer to read on screen can navigate to each section of interest using the links and menus provided whilst a full print version is also available for those who prefer to read offline and from paper. Suitable for: undergraduate year one level learners. Dr David J Parker, School of Sociology and Social Policy. David Parker is This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. This module introduces students to a range of approaches in social analysis. Through introductions to key concepts, theorists and research studies in the disciplines of sociology, cultural studies and social policy, students will be equipped with the skills necessary for more advanced study of contemporary society. Two routes to reading this module's contents are offered. Those who prefer to read on screen can navigate to each section of interest using the links and menus provided whilst a full print version is also available for those who prefer to read offline and from paper. Suitable for: undergraduate year one level learners. Dr David J Parker, School of Sociology and Social Policy. David Parker is

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Sociology | Sociology | Culture | Culture | Social Policy | Social Policy | Social Science | Social Science | Social Studies | Social Studies

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Orchestrating cell separation in plants : what are the risks and benefits? Orchestrating cell separation in plants : what are the risks and benefits?

Description

Professor Roberts also discusses the resistance faced to research in this field, exploring the potential problems it presents and benefits for both the plant and agriculture. Professor Roberts also discusses the resistance faced to research in this field, exploring the potential problems it presents and benefits for both the plant and agriculture. In this podcast, Professor Roberts from the School of Biosciences discusses his research into the mechanism responsible for regulating cell separation in plants. In particular how plants ‘shed’ parts of themselves such as leaves or fruit. Professor Roberts explores the potential application of his research, through prevention or encouraging of the ‘shedding’ process, agricultural harvests could potentially be increased or even synchronised. Professor Roberts also discusses the resistance faced to research in this field, exploring the potential problems it presents and benefits for both the plant and agriculture. In this podcast, Professor Roberts from the School of Biosciences discusses his research into the mechanism responsible for regulating cell separation in plants. In particular how plants ‘shed’ parts of themselves such as leaves or fruit. Professor Roberts explores the potential application of his research, through prevention or encouraging of the ‘shedding’ process, agricultural harvests could potentially be increased or even synchronised. Professor Roberts also discusses the resistance faced to research in this field, exploring the potential problems it presents and benefits for both the plant and agriculture.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Understanding global politics Understanding global politics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches to politics in a global context. Suitable for: Undergraduate level one students Dr Vanessa Pupavac, Dr Xiaoke Zhang, Dr Sabine Carey, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Vanessa Pupavac is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. She has previously worke This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module introduces global politics through the major theoretical, historical and empirical ways of seeing international relations. Different claims, about, for example, human nature, power, war, peace, the state, society, law and politics are offered by thinkers who exercise a major influence on our contemporary understanding. These claims contribute to different approaches to politics in a global context. Suitable for: Undergraduate level one students Dr Vanessa Pupavac, Dr Xiaoke Zhang, Dr Sabine Carey, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Vanessa Pupavac is a lecturer in International Relations at the University of Nottingham. She has previously worke

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Global Politics | Global Politics | International Relations | International Relations | Politics | Politics | Realism | Realism | Liberalism | Liberalism | Social Constructivism | Social Constructivism | Marxist Theories of International Relations | Marxist Theories of International Relations | Ethics and International Relations | Ethics and International Relations | International History versus International Relations | International History versus International Relations

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Organisation of organs Organisation of organs

Description

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 The learning object, used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy describes how a hollow organ such as the intestine, and a compact organ such as a salivary gland, are formed from the four basic tissue types. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 The learning object, used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy describes how a hollow organ such as the intestine, and a compact organ such as a salivary gland, are formed from the four basic tissue types. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Histology | Histology | Cell | Cell | Biology | Biology | Tissues | Tissues | Organs | Organs

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Uniform convergence and pointwise convergence Uniform convergence and pointwise convergence

Description

Target audience: Most of this material should be accessible to anyone who understands what a real-valued function is, and understands the notion of convergence of a sequence of real numbers. This should include most mathematics undergraduates by the end of their first year. An understanding of continuity and of boundedness for real-valued functions defined on various types of domain would help the student to understand the latter part of the material. Target audience: Most of this material should be accessible to anyone who understands what a real-valued function is, and understands the notion of convergence of a sequence of real numbers. This should include most mathematics undergraduates by the end of their first year. An understanding of continuity and of boundedness for real-valued functions defined on various types of domain would help the student to understand the latter part of the material. The aim of this material is to introduce the student to two notions of convergence for sequences of real-valued functions. The notion of pointwise convergence is relatively straightforward, but the notion of uniform convergence is more subtle. Uniform convergence is explained in terms of closed function balls and the new notion of sets absorbing sequences. The differences between the two types of convergence are illustrated with several examples. Some standard facts are also discussed: a uniform limit of continuous functions must be continuous; a uniform limit of bounded functions must be bounded; a uniform limit of unbounded functions must be unbounded. Target audience: Most of this material should be accessible to anyone who understands what a real-valued function is, and understands The aim of this material is to introduce the student to two notions of convergence for sequences of real-valued functions. The notion of pointwise convergence is relatively straightforward, but the notion of uniform convergence is more subtle. Uniform convergence is explained in terms of closed function balls and the new notion of sets absorbing sequences. The differences between the two types of convergence are illustrated with several examples. Some standard facts are also discussed: a uniform limit of continuous functions must be continuous; a uniform limit of bounded functions must be bounded; a uniform limit of unbounded functions must be unbounded. Target audience: Most of this material should be accessible to anyone who understands what a real-valued function is, and understands

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Pointwise convergence | Pointwise convergence | Uniform convergence | Uniform convergence | Pure mathmatics | Pure mathmatics | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Organisation of the nervous system Organisation of the nervous system

Description

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object describes the cellular organisation of the spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerves. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object describes the cellular organisation of the spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerves. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Histology | Histology | Cell | Cell | Biology | Biology | Nervous | Nervous | System | System | Nerves | Nerves | Neurones | Neurones | Spinal | Spinal | cord | cord | Neuroglia | Neuroglia | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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User-generated content : archeologies, economies and ecologies User-generated content : archeologies, economies and ecologies

Description

Jon is a leading researcher in the field of interactive media and gaming and spent the first 15 years of his working life in video production, working through the early years of Channel Four as a researcher, editor and eventually as Producer. He worked principally in documentary and experimental video, co founding original scratch artists Gorilla Tapes in 1984. His video projects gained international distribution and recognition and have now taken their place in the documented histories of UK Video Art. After moving to Bristol in 1990 he worked at the Watershed Media Centre for two years before teaching at the University of Plymouth in 1992 and then at both the University of the West of England School of Cultural Studies and the University of Bristol. As Head of the Department of Drama at Jon is a leading researcher in the field of interactive media and gaming and spent the first 15 years of his working life in video production, working through the early years of Channel Four as a researcher, editor and eventually as Producer. He worked principally in documentary and experimental video, co founding original scratch artists Gorilla Tapes in 1984. His video projects gained international distribution and recognition and have now taken their place in the documented histories of UK Video Art. After moving to Bristol in 1990 he worked at the Watershed Media Centre for two years before teaching at the University of Plymouth in 1992 and then at both the University of the West of England School of Cultural Studies and the University of Bristol. As Head of the Department of Drama at In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media workshops, Professor Jon Dovey (UWE) presents his research into user-generated content. PLEASE NOTE: The presntation begins with a five minute video clip - keynote begins thereafter. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Professor Jon Dovey, University of the West of England Jon has recently been appointed to the new Faculty of Creative Arts at University of the West of England with a view to raising the profile of media research there. The vehicle for this will be the Digital Cultures Research Centre, interfacing industry and academia, based at the Pervasive Media Studio. Jon is a leading researcher in In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media workshops, Professor Jon Dovey (UWE) presents his research into user-generated content. PLEASE NOTE: The presntation begins with a five minute video clip - keynote begins thereafter. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Professor Jon Dovey, University of the West of England Jon has recently been appointed to the new Faculty of Creative Arts at University of the West of England with a view to raising the profile of media research there. The vehicle for this will be the Digital Cultures Research Centre, interfacing industry and academia, based at the Pervasive Media Studio. Jon is a leading researcher in

Subjects

UNow | UNow | User-generated Content | User-generated Content | Emphemeral Media | Emphemeral Media | Humanities | Humanities | Film and Television Studies | Film and Television Studies | New Media | New Media | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Parasympathetic nervous system Parasympathetic nervous system

Description

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object explains the anatomical organisation of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011 This learning object explains the anatomical organisation of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Histology | Histology | Cell | Cell | Biology | Biology | Nervous | Nervous | System | System | Parasympathetic | Parasympathetic | Autonomic | Autonomic | Nerves | Nerves | Neurones | Neurones

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Using composite materials to replace bone Using composite materials to replace bone

Description

For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery. For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery. In this podcast, Professor Chris Rudd, Dean of the faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham, describes his work with composite materials in the car industry and how it can be applied to the field of medicine. Traditionally, patients who have lost bone in an accident or have had bone removed due to cancer have had to endure two very long and very painful operations. One operation to attach steel plates to the bone, and a second operation once the bone has healed, to remove them. For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery. In this podcast, Professor Chris Rudd, Dean of the faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham, describes his work with composite materials in the car industry and how it can be applied to the field of medicine. Traditionally, patients who have lost bone in an accident or have had bone removed due to cancer have had to endure two very long and very painful operations. One operation to attach steel plates to the bone, and a second operation once the bone has healed, to remove them. For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Bone replacement | Bone replacement | Degradable polymers in the body | Degradable polymers in the body | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Parliament in the UK Parliament in the UK

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The module identifies and evaluates the role that Parliament plays in the political system. The module is both descriptive and analytical, comprising an introduction to Parliament (such as its place in the political process, and the impact of party) and an investigation into the effectiveness or otherwise of its scrutiny and influence of selected sectors of government responsibility. It covers the process of legislation, scrutiny, and links with the public. The module also includes consideration of the role of the House of Lords. Module Code: M13043 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 3 Credits:20 Professor Philip Cowley Professor Cowley's research intere This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The module identifies and evaluates the role that Parliament plays in the political system. The module is both descriptive and analytical, comprising an introduction to Parliament (such as its place in the political process, and the impact of party) and an investigation into the effectiveness or otherwise of its scrutiny and influence of selected sectors of government responsibility. It covers the process of legislation, scrutiny, and links with the public. The module also includes consideration of the role of the House of Lords. Module Code: M13043 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 3 Credits:20 Professor Philip Cowley Professor Cowley's research intere

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code M13043 | Module Code M13043 | Parliament plays in the political system | Parliament plays in the political system | introduction to Parliament | introduction to Parliament | impact of party | impact of party | government responsibility | government responsibility | House of Lords | House of Lords | legislation | legislation | parliamentary reform | parliamentary reform | political process | political process

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Virtual field trip Virtual field trip

Description

An interactive map containing computer generated 3D views of the Bowscale and Bannerdale area overlain with geology, and also alternative map data layers for the two study site is available via the 'Virtual Tour' icon on the computer desktops. An interactive map containing computer generated 3D views of the Bowscale and Bannerdale area overlain with geology, and also alternative map data layers for the two study site is available via the 'Virtual Tour' icon on the computer desktops.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Bowscale Tarn | Cumbria | Bowscale Tarn | Cumbria | Bannerdale | Cumbria | Bannerdale | Cumbria | Geology | Geology | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Pathway 2 Information : citing references Pathway 2 Information : citing references

Description

The module aims to provide an introductory guide to why referencing and citing is important and how to reference particular types of material according to different referencing styles. This skill is required by students throughout their degree courses and backs up more traditional face-to-face teaching in this area. The module uses an interactive approach, using activities to help students fully understand the concepts of referencing. The module aims to provide an introductory guide to why referencing and citing is important and how to reference particular types of material according to different referencing styles. This skill is required by students throughout their degree courses and backs up more traditional face-to-face teaching in this area. The module uses an interactive approach, using activities to help students fully understand the concepts of referencing. The citing and referencing module is part of a wider online tutorial designed to teach a range of information skills to undergraduate students. The module aims to provide an introductory guide to why referencing and citing is important and how to reference particular types of material according to different referencing styles. This skill is required by students throughout their degree courses and backs up more traditional face-to-face teaching in this area. The module uses an interactive approach, using activities to help students fully understand the concepts of referencing. The citing and referencing module is part of a wider online tutorial designed to teach a range of information skills to undergraduate students. The module aims to provide an introductory guide to why referencing and citing is important and how to reference particular types of material according to different referencing styles. This skill is required by students throughout their degree courses and backs up more traditional face-to-face teaching in this area. The module uses an interactive approach, using activities to help students fully understand the concepts of referencing.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Referencing | Referencing | Citing of sources | Citing of sources | Harvard system of referencing | Harvard system of referencing | Numeric system of referencing | Numeric system of referencing | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Virtual performing arts studio Virtual performing arts studio

Description

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | virtual performing arts studio | virtual performing arts studio | introduction to drama | introduction to drama | second life | second life | vpas | vpas | school of english studies | school of english studies

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Patterns of life Patterns of life

Description

Each set of files is organised into topics, which are set out in two ways. For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order. For non-linear learners they are organised via an interactive “mind map”, which is a diagram showing how the different sub-topics fit together into the main topic. A printable version of the mind map is also made available. All this is done within WebCT. Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures. This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined by them. It enabled portability: learners could, if they wished, download the mp3 files, transcripts and/or the visual aids and study them at any time and in any place they chose. The learners were also asked to read one or more jou Each set of files is organised into topics, which are set out in two ways. For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order. For non-linear learners they are organised via an interactive “mind map”, which is a diagram showing how the different sub-topics fit together into the main topic. A printable version of the mind map is also made available. All this is done within WebCT. Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures. This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined by them. It enabled portability: learners could, if they wished, download the mp3 files, transcripts and/or the visual aids and study them at any time and in any place they chose. The learners were also asked to read one or more jou Each mp3 voice recording accompanies a PowerPoint slide or set of slides. These two files were bundled together with a transcript of the mp3s (mainly for people with hearing disabilities) and a printer-friendly pdf of the slides. Each set of files is organised into topics, which are set out in two ways. For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order. For non-linear learners they are organised via an interactive “mind map”, which is a diagram showing how the different sub-topics fit together into the main topic. A printable version of the mind map is also made available. All this is done within WebCT. Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures. This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined Each mp3 voice recording accompanies a PowerPoint slide or set of slides. These two files were bundled together with a transcript of the mp3s (mainly for people with hearing disabilities) and a printer-friendly pdf of the slides. Each set of files is organised into topics, which are set out in two ways. For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order. For non-linear learners they are organised via an interactive “mind map”, which is a diagram showing how the different sub-topics fit together into the main topic. A printable version of the mind map is also made available. All this is done within WebCT. Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures. This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Virtual yeast cell Virtual yeast cell

Description

This rich learning object is used to introduce yeast cytology to students taking Module D24BS3 Brewery Yeast Management as part of the MSc in Brewing Science. The virtual cell permits the students to understand structure and function of yeast organelles. This rich learning object is used to introduce yeast cytology to students taking Module D24BS3 Brewery Yeast Management as part of the MSc in Brewing Science. The virtual cell permits the students to understand structure and function of yeast organelles.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | U-now | U-now | u now | u now | open courseware | open courseware | Learning Team | Learning Team | e-Learning | e-Learning | educational | educational | Creative Commons | Creative Commons | resources | resources | eLeK committee | information Services | eLeK committee | information Services | UKOER | UKOER

License

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Vitamin village Vitamin village

Description

The creation and development involved staff within Nutritional Sciences (Drs John Brameld, Zoe Daniel & Tim Parr and Professor Andy Salter) and the Information Services Learning team. The creation and development involved staff within Nutritional Sciences (Drs John Brameld, Zoe Daniel & Tim Parr and Professor Andy Salter) and the Information Services Learning team. The Vitamin Village is a web-based eLearning package developed between 2001 and 2008 to incorporate vitamins A, C, D, E and K, as well as a basic introduction to antioxidants. It is mainly used in first year teaching of vitamins, but also in the 2nd and 3rd years of the 3 year BSc (Hons) Nutrition and 4 year MNutr Nutrition degrees taught within the School of Biosciences. The creation and development involved staff within Nutritional Sciences (Drs John Brameld, Zoe Daniel & Tim Parr and Professor Andy Salter) and the Information Services Learning team. The Vitamin Village is a web-based eLearning package developed between 2001 and 2008 to incorporate vitamins A, C, D, E and K, as well as a basic introduction to antioxidants. It is mainly used in first year teaching of vitamins, but also in the 2nd and 3rd years of the 3 year BSc (Hons) Nutrition and 4 year MNutr Nutrition degrees taught within the School of Biosciences. The creation and development involved staff within Nutritional Sciences (Drs John Brameld, Zoe Daniel & Tim Parr and Professor Andy Salter) and the Information Services Learning team.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Vitamin | Vitamin | Vitamin A | Vitamin A | Vitamin C | Vitamin C | Vitamin D | Vitamin D | Vitamin E | Vitamin E | Vitamin K | Vitamin K | Nutrition | Nutrition | UKOER | UKOER

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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War on climate change War on climate change

Description

Professor Eckersley is among a group of experts who believe that military intervention may be reasonably used to protect natural resources. Professor Eckersley is among a group of experts who believe that military intervention may be reasonably used to protect natural resources. In this podcast - Going to war for the environment? Dr Matthew Humphrey, Reader in Political Philosophy assesses a controversial theory by Australian academic Professor Robyn Eckersley. Professor Eckersley is among a group of experts who believe that military intervention may be reasonably used to protect natural resources. In this podcast - Going to war for the environment? Dr Matthew Humphrey, Reader in Political Philosophy assesses a controversial theory by Australian academic Professor Robyn Eckersley. Professor Eckersley is among a group of experts who believe that military intervention may be reasonably used to protect natural resources.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Climate Change | Climate Change | Global Warming | Global Warming | Professor Robyn Eckersley | Professor Robyn Eckersley | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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War, peace & political thought War, peace & political thought

Description

As taught Spring Semester 2011. This is an advanced module in the history of international political thought for MA students. It is structured in two parts. The first, comprising sessions 2-7, is concerned with an approach to the history of international theory, influential in the field, which insists on placing theorists in one of three ‘traditions’. We interrogate the integrity of these traditions, in each case, by analysing the work of at least two writers who are said to belong squarely to the tradition, or indeed to have founded it. In the second part of the module, we examine a number of ways in which international relations theorists and political theorists are turning their attention to the history of political theory or international thought in order to illuminate or evaluate As taught Spring Semester 2011. This is an advanced module in the history of international political thought for MA students. It is structured in two parts. The first, comprising sessions 2-7, is concerned with an approach to the history of international theory, influential in the field, which insists on placing theorists in one of three ‘traditions’. We interrogate the integrity of these traditions, in each case, by analysing the work of at least two writers who are said to belong squarely to the tradition, or indeed to have founded it. In the second part of the module, we examine a number of ways in which international relations theorists and political theorists are turning their attention to the history of political theory or international thought in order to illuminate or evaluate

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | M14136 | M14136 | M14137 | M14137

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Weapons of mass destruction Weapons of mass destruction

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. With the possible exception of climate change, weapons of mass destruction are probably the only thing on the planet that could conceivably mean curtains for all of us. Yet Britain has relied on its nuclear arsenal for decades, and other states seem anxious to acquire one. Why do some countries have these things? What, if anything, should we do about them? How should we feel about their spread? These are some of the questions we will examine in this module. The goal is to familiarise you with the policy issues and the theoretical debates underlying them. Module Code: M13103 Credits: 20 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 3 Dr Matthew Rendall, School of Politics and This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. With the possible exception of climate change, weapons of mass destruction are probably the only thing on the planet that could conceivably mean curtains for all of us. Yet Britain has relied on its nuclear arsenal for decades, and other states seem anxious to acquire one. Why do some countries have these things? What, if anything, should we do about them? How should we feel about their spread? These are some of the questions we will examine in this module. The goal is to familiarise you with the policy issues and the theoretical debates underlying them. Module Code: M13103 Credits: 20 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 3 Dr Matthew Rendall, School of Politics and

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code: M13103 | Module Code: M13103 | nuclear arsenal | nuclear arsenal | Nuclear Strategy and Deterrence | Nuclear Strategy and Deterrence | Nuclear Disarmament | Nuclear Disarmament | Preventive War | Preventive War | Effects of Weapons of Mass Destruction | Effects of Weapons of Mass Destruction | Catastrophic Threats | Catastrophic Threats | WMD and Global Warming | WMD and Global Warming

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why do we do proofs? Why do we do proofs?

Description

The aim of this session is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs, why proofs are important, and how they can help us. In particular, the student will learn the following: proofs can help you to really see WHY a result is true; problems that are easy to state can be hard to solve (Fermat's Last Theorem); sometimes statements which appear to be intuitively obvious may turn out to be false (the Hospitals paradox); the answer to a question will often depend crucially on the definitions you are working with. Target audience: suitable for anyone with a knowledge of elementary algebra and prime numbers, as may be obtained by studying A level mathematics. The aim of this session is to motivate students to understand why we might want to do proofs, why proofs are important, and how they can help us. In particular, the student will learn the following: proofs can help you to really see WHY a result is true; problems that are easy to state can be hard to solve (Fermat's Last Theorem); sometimes statements which appear to be intuitively obvious may turn out to be false (the Hospitals paradox); the answer to a question will often depend crucially on the definitions you are working with. Target audience: suitable for anyone with a knowledge of elementary algebra and prime numbers, as may be obtained by studying A level mathematics.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Mathematical proofs | Mathematical proofs | UKOER | UKOER

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Why study a Book of Common Prayer? : with Dr Frances Knight in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin Why study a Book of Common Prayer? : with Dr Frances Knight in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin

Description

In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr. Frances Knight, an expert in history of Anglicanism, shows how a single book from the early nineteenth century – a copy of the Book of Common Prayer – can be the key to understanding the religious culture of a period. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr. Frances Knight, an expert in history of Anglicanism, shows how a single book from the early nineteenth century – a copy of the Book of Common Prayer – can be the key to understanding the religious culture of a period.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Church | Church | History | History | Religion | Religion | Anglicans | Anglicans | Catholics | Catholics | Gunpowder | Gunpowder | Plot | Plot

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study church history? Why study church history?

Description

Two eminent modern church historians, Prof. Alan Ford and Dr Frances Knight, discuss the nature of their discipline exploring how it sits between the aims of historians and theologians: belonging to both disciplines, it has a distinctive task and voice. Two eminent modern church historians, Prof. Alan Ford and Dr Frances Knight, discuss the nature of their discipline exploring how it sits between the aims of historians and theologians: belonging to both disciplines, it has a distinctive task and voice.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | history | history | religious | religious | church | church | sectarianism | sectarianism | nationalism | nationalism | hatred | hatred | identity | identity | ecumenism | ecumenism | Irish | Irish

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study Ibn Taymiyya? Why study Ibn Taymiyya?

Description

Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328 C.E.) was an Islamic thinker who has exerted, and continues to exert, an enormous influence within Islamic thought. Taymiyya was often quoted by the late Osama Bin Laden and in this video, Jon Hoover, who has made a study of him and his importance in Islam, introduces Taymiyya and his thoughts. Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328 C.E.) was an Islamic thinker who has exerted, and continues to exert, an enormous influence within Islamic thought. Taymiyya was often quoted by the late Osama Bin Laden and in this video, Jon Hoover, who has made a study of him and his importance in Islam, introduces Taymiyya and his thoughts.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | God | God | Koran | Koran | Islam | Islam | Moslems | Moslems | Arabic | Arabic | Religion | Religion | theology | theology | belief | belief | Qur'an | Qur'an

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study icons? Why study icons?

Description

Icons – religious images from the eastern Churches – are far more than religious images as seen in western churches: they enable an encounter between the observer and the mystery. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them. Icons – religious images from the eastern Churches – are far more than religious images as seen in western churches: they enable an encounter between the observer and the mystery. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Orthodoxy | Orthodoxy | ukoer | ukoer | Christianity | Christianity | God | God | Jesus | Jesus | church | church | religion | religion | theology | theology | Eastern | Eastern | Greek | Greek

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Why study Karl Rahner? : with Dr Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin Why study Karl Rahner? : with Dr Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin

Description

The work of the German theologian Karl Rahner (1904-84) has had a profound influence in the later decades of the twentieth century. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr. Karen Kilby, one of the world’s foremost authorities on the work of Karl Rahner, identifies key elements of his thought and suggests that these are still valuable insights for Christian thinkers. The work of the German theologian Karl Rahner (1904-84) has had a profound influence in the later decades of the twentieth century. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr. Karen Kilby, one of the world’s foremost authorities on the work of Karl Rahner, identifies key elements of his thought and suggests that these are still valuable insights for Christian thinkers.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Systematics | Systematics | Theology | Theology | Catholic | Catholic | Theologians | Theologians | Religion | Religion | Faith | Faith | Belief | Belief | Reason | Reason

License

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