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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | Lawrence | MA | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | 21h.104 | 21h.104 | 11.015 | 11.015

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad? This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy | WWI | WWI | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT) 17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT)

Description

This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations. This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subjects

URIECA | URIECA | laboratory | laboratory | kinase | kinase | cancer cells | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | DNA | DNA | cultures | cultures | UV-Vis | UV-Vis | agarose gel | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | affinity tags | lyse | lyse | digest | digest | mutants | mutants | resistance | resistance | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | recombinant | nickel affinity | nickel affinity | inhibitors | inhibitors | biochemistry | biochemistry | kinetics | kinetics | enzyme | enzyme | inhibition | inhibition | purification | purification | expression | expression | Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | innovation | innovation | military organizations | military organizations | war | war | history | history | organization theory | organization theory | empirical study | empirical study | land warfare | land warfare | battleships | battleships | airpower | airpower | submarines | submarines | cruise | cruise | ballistic | ballistic | missiles | missiles | armor | armor | military affairs | military affairs | strategic | strategic | tactical | tactical | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | Vietnam | Vietnam | Revolution in Military Affairs | Revolution in Military Affairs | RMA | RMA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

21H.104 | 21H.104 | 11.015 | 11.015 | riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.504 East Asia in the World (MIT) 21H.504 East Asia in the World (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners. This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners.

Subjects

History | History | China | China | Japan | Japan | Korea | Korea | Vietnam | Vietnam

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.381J Women and War in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines women's experiences during and after war, revolution, and genocide. The focus of the course is mostly on the 20th century and on North America, Europe and the Middle East.

Subjects

21H.381 | WGS.222 | women | war | revolution | genocide | September 11 | rape | Sierra Leone Civil War | military | combat | peace | activisim | human rights | Vietnam | Vietnamese Women's Union | Women's Union of Liberation | antiwar | feminism | sterilization | reproduction | transmission | Palestinian-Israel conflict | Palestine | Israel | Persepolis | Ravished Armenia | gender

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Francis Ford Coppola, Apocalypse Now

Description

Video and Powerpoint of lecture by Jon Beasley-Murray for the "Remake/Remodel" theme

Subjects

Jon Beasley-Murray | lecture | powerpoint | Remake/Remodel | video | aesthetics | Benjamin | C20th | Coppola | Film | USA | Vietnam | violence | Walter Benjamin | war

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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Coppola, Apocalypse Now

Description

Slides and video recording of lecture from Christina Hendricks' lecture on Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Derek Gladwin's lecture on Coppola's Apocalypse Now, January 11, 2016.

Subjects

Derek Gladwin | lecture | powerpoint | Seeing and Knowing | video | Achebe | Africa | Apocalypse Now | Conrad | Coppola | Eliot | Film | Heart of Darkness | Vietnam War

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies. The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

riot | strike | conspiracy | cities | urbanism | U.S. history | revolutionary war | boston tea party | civil war | slavery | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | textile workers | Lawrence | MA | student uprising | Vietnam War | Columbia University | communism | socialism | Lawrence | MA | 21h.104 | 11.015

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future (MIT)

Description

Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? Would other policies have better served the U.S. and/or the wider world? Were the beliefs that guided U.S. policy true or false? If false, what explains these misperceptions? General theories that bear on the causes and consequences of American policy will be applied to explain and evaluate past and present policies.The history of United States foreign policy in the 20th century is covered in detail. Functional topics are also covered: U.S. military policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and U.S. policy on human rights and democracy overseas. Finally, we will predict and prescribe f

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

21H.104 | 11.015 | riot | strike | conspiracy | cities | urbanism | U.S. history | revolutionary war | boston tea party | civil war | slavery | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | textile workers | Lawrence | MA | student uprising | Vietnam War | Columbia University | communism | socialism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.504 East Asia in the World (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners.

Subjects

History | China | Japan | Korea | Vietnam

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT)

Description

This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subjects

URIECA | laboratory | kinase | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | DNA | cultures | UV-Vis | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | lyse | digest | mutants | resistance | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | nickel affinity | inhibitors | biochemistry | kinetics | enzyme | inhibition | purification | expression | Political science | security studies | innovation | military organizations | war | history | organization theory | empirical study | land warfare | battleships | airpower | submarines | cruise | ballistic | missiles | armor | military affairs | strategic | tactical | counterinsurgency | Vietnam | Revolution in Military Affairs | RMA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | rational choice | riots | rebellions | revolutions | rationality | j-curve | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | Vietnam | politics | insurgency | civil war | ethnicity | race riot | urban riot | Rodney King | relative deprivation | Spilerman | racial disturbances | protest | nationalist violence | USSR | Balkans | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Mali

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | wars | interventions | Cold War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | Iran | Guatemala | Iraq | Afghanistan | China | human rights | environment | foreign economic policy | military policy | WWI | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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