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11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT) 11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors. This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | technological capabilities | technological capabilities | world technological frontier | world technological frontier | innovation | innovation | new products | new products | production engineering | production engineering | project execution | project execution | borrowed technology | borrowed technology | third world development | third world development | industrialization | industrialization | pre WWII | pre WWII | post WWII | post WWII | underdevelopment | underdevelopment | lendingm | lendingm | government regulation | government regulation | 11.491 | 11.491 | 17.176 | 17.176

License

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Historical Experience (MIT) Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | literature | history | history | anthropology | anthropology | film | film | cultural studies | cultural studies | Asian Americans | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | Asian immigration | ethnicity | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | racial stereotyping | media racism | media racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | glass ceiling | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | harassment | violence | violence | 21F.043J | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21H.150 | 21F.043 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT) 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future (MIT)

Description

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad? This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Subjects

American Foreign Policy | American Foreign Policy | wars | wars | interventions | interventions | Cold War | Cold War | Korean War | Korean War | Vietnam war | Vietnam war | Cuban missile crisis | Cuban missile crisis | CIA | CIA | Iran | Iran | Guatemala | Guatemala | Iraq | Iraq | Afghanistan | Afghanistan | China | China | human rights | human rights | environment | environment | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | military policy | military policy | WWI | WWI | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the relationship between race and crime in the United States, with a special emphasis on the role this relationship has played in the development of American ideas about citizenship and nationhood. This course surveys the relationship between race and crime in the United States, with a special emphasis on the role this relationship has played in the development of American ideas about citizenship and nationhood.

Subjects

race | race | criminal justice | criminal justice | politics | politics | criminal law | criminal law | procedure | procedure | punishment | punishment | race-crime nexus | race-crime nexus | capital punishment | capital punishment | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | war on drugs | war on drugs | sentencing disaprity | sentencing disaprity | illegal immigration | illegal immigration | japanese internment | japanese internment | WWII | WWII | religion | religion | profiling | profiling | preemptive strategy | preemptive strategy | war on terror | war on terror | aliens | aliens | citizens | citizens | supreme court | supreme court | bar | bar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.209 America in Depression and War (MIT) 21H.209 America in Depression and War (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the Great Depression and World War II and how they led to a major reordering of American politics and society. We will examine how ordinary people experienced these crises and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them. This course focuses on the Great Depression and World War II and how they led to a major reordering of American politics and society. We will examine how ordinary people experienced these crises and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them.

Subjects

great depression | great depression | new deal | new deal | WWII | WWII | world war II | world war II | the great crash | the great crash | stock market crash | stock market crash

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.914 Jewish History from Biblical to Modern Times (MIT) 21H.914 Jewish History from Biblical to Modern Times (MIT)

Description

This course explores how our views of Jewish history have been formed and how this history can explain the survival of the Jews as an ethnic/religious group into the present day. Special attention is given to the partial and fragmentary nature of our information about the past, and the difficulties inherent in decoding statements about the past that were written with a religious agenda in mind. It also considers complex events in Jewish history -- from early history as portrayed in the Bible to recent history, including the Holocaust. This course explores how our views of Jewish history have been formed and how this history can explain the survival of the Jews as an ethnic/religious group into the present day. Special attention is given to the partial and fragmentary nature of our information about the past, and the difficulties inherent in decoding statements about the past that were written with a religious agenda in mind. It also considers complex events in Jewish history -- from early history as portrayed in the Bible to recent history, including the Holocaust.

Subjects

Five books of Moses | Five books of Moses | Genesis | Genesis | Exodus | Exodus | bible | bible | Solomon | Solomon | biblical Israel | biblical Israel | Judaea | Judaea | Rome | Rome | Maccabean Revolution | Maccabean Revolution | Roman hostility to the Jews | Roman hostility to the Jews | Maimonides | Maimonides | Medieval Jewiwsh Traders | Medieval Jewiwsh Traders | Ashkenazi | Ashkenazi | Holocaust | Holocaust | facism | facism | Polish Jewish | Polish Jewish | WWII | WWII | Auschwitz | Auschwitz | Nazis | Nazis | Night | Night | Warsaw Ghetto | Warsaw Ghetto | Anne Frank | Anne Frank | Jewish economic elites | Jewish economic elites | elite minority | elite minority | Jewish immigrant | Jewish immigrant | American Jew | American Jew

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.640 Gender, Race, and the Construction of the American West (MIT) WGS.640 Gender, Race, and the Construction of the American West (MIT)

Description

This course explores how gender shaped the historical experiences and cultural productions in the North American West during the time it was being explored, settled, and imagined. The North American West of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries provides a fascinating case study of the shifting meanings of gender, race, citizenship, and power in border societies. As the site of migration, settlement, and displacement, it spawned contests over land, labor disputes, inter-ethnic conflicts and peaceful relations, and many kinds of cultural productions. The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS) This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies. The GCWS at MIT brings together scholars and teachers at nine degree-granting institutions in the Boston area who This course explores how gender shaped the historical experiences and cultural productions in the North American West during the time it was being explored, settled, and imagined. The North American West of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries provides a fascinating case study of the shifting meanings of gender, race, citizenship, and power in border societies. As the site of migration, settlement, and displacement, it spawned contests over land, labor disputes, inter-ethnic conflicts and peaceful relations, and many kinds of cultural productions. The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS) This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies. The GCWS at MIT brings together scholars and teachers at nine degree-granting institutions in the Boston area who

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | American west | American west | frontier | frontier | Great Plains | Great Plains | Borderlands | Borderlands | sexuality | sexuality | immigration | immigration | migration | migration | labor | labor | politics | politics | reform | reform | Great Depression | Great Depression | WWII | WWII | Georgia O'Keefe | Georgia O'Keefe

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | criminal justice | citizenship | citizenship | nationhood | nationhood | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | religion | religion | mass incarceration | mass incarceration | poverty | poverty | class | class | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | death penalty | death penalty | drug laws | drug laws | police | police | terrorism | terrorism | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | 9/11 | Ferguson | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | George Zimmerman | militarization | militarization | guilt | guilt | innocence | innocence | illegal alien | illegal alien | undocumented | undocumented | immigration | immigration | deportation | deportation | civil liberties | civil liberties | internment | internment | Japanese | Japanese | WWII | WWII | police brutality | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the relationship between race and crime in the United States, with a special emphasis on the role this relationship has played in the development of American ideas about citizenship and nationhood. This course surveys the relationship between race and crime in the United States, with a special emphasis on the role this relationship has played in the development of American ideas about citizenship and nationhood.

Subjects

race | race | criminal justice | criminal justice | politics | politics | criminal law | criminal law | procedure | procedure | punishment | punishment | race-crime nexus | race-crime nexus | capital punishment | capital punishment | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | war on drugs | war on drugs | sentencing disaprity | sentencing disaprity | illegal immigration | illegal immigration | japanese internment | japanese internment | WWII | WWII | religion | religion | profiling | profiling | preemptive strategy | preemptive strategy | war on terror | war on terror | aliens | aliens | citizens | citizens | supreme court | supreme court | bar | bar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT) 21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence. An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | asian immigration | chinese problem | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | anti-asian movements | WWII | WWII | new wave immigration | new wave immigration | racism | racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | Chinatown | Chinatown | panethnicity | panethnicity | memoir | memoir | chinese exlucsion | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | Philippines | japanese-american internment | japanese-american internment | diaspora | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors.

Subjects

economic growth | technological capabilities | world technological frontier | innovation | new products | production engineering | project execution | borrowed technology | third world development | industrialization | pre WWII | post WWII | underdevelopment | lendingm | government regulation | 11.491 | 17.176

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | WWII | new wave immigration | racism | affirmative action | race | ethnicity | Chinatown | panethnicity | memoir | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | japanese-american internment | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | Film | Cinema | Movies | History | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Aesthetics | German film-making | Second World War | German Cinema | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | East Germany | film production | film analysis | German cinematic production | German history | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | visual histories | West Germany | America | Hollywood | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII

License

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the relationship between race and crime in the United States, with a special emphasis on the role this relationship has played in the development of American ideas about citizenship and nationhood.

Subjects

race | criminal justice | politics | criminal law | procedure | punishment | race-crime nexus | capital punishment | felon disenfranchisement | war on drugs | sentencing disaprity | illegal immigration | japanese internment | WWII | religion | profiling | preemptive strategy | war on terror | aliens | citizens | supreme court | bar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | WWII | new wave immigration | racism | affirmative action | race | ethnicity | Chinatown | panethnicity | memoir | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | japanese-american internment | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | history | anthropology | film | cultural studies | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | media racism | affirmative action | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | violence | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | citizenship | nationhood | race | ethnicity | religion | mass incarceration | poverty | class | criminal punishment | death penalty | drug laws | police | terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | militarization | guilt | innocence | illegal alien | undocumented | immigration | deportation | civil liberties | internment | Japanese | WWII | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.209 America in Depression and War (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the Great Depression and World War II and how they led to a major reordering of American politics and society. We will examine how ordinary people experienced these crises and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them.

Subjects

great depression | new deal | WWII | world war II | the great crash | stock market crash

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.914 Jewish History from Biblical to Modern Times (MIT)

Description

This course explores how our views of Jewish history have been formed and how this history can explain the survival of the Jews as an ethnic/religious group into the present day. Special attention is given to the partial and fragmentary nature of our information about the past, and the difficulties inherent in decoding statements about the past that were written with a religious agenda in mind. It also considers complex events in Jewish history -- from early history as portrayed in the Bible to recent history, including the Holocaust.

Subjects

Five books of Moses | Genesis | Exodus | bible | Solomon | biblical Israel | Judaea | Rome | Maccabean Revolution | Roman hostility to the Jews | Maimonides | Medieval Jewiwsh Traders | Ashkenazi | Holocaust | facism | Polish Jewish | WWII | Auschwitz | Nazis | Night | Warsaw Ghetto | Anne Frank | Jewish economic elites | elite minority | Jewish immigrant | American Jew

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.640 Gender, Race, and the Construction of the American West (MIT)

Description

This course explores how gender shaped the historical experiences and cultural productions in the North American West during the time it was being explored, settled, and imagined. The North American West of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries provides a fascinating case study of the shifting meanings of gender, race, citizenship, and power in border societies. As the site of migration, settlement, and displacement, it spawned contests over land, labor disputes, inter-ethnic conflicts and peaceful relations, and many kinds of cultural productions. The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS) This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies. The GCWS at MIT brings together scholars and teachers at nine degree-granting institutions in the Boston area who

Subjects

gender | race | American west | frontier | Great Plains | Borderlands | sexuality | immigration | migration | labor | politics | reform | Great Depression | WWII | Georgia O'Keefe

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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