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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | Corruption | Corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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