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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well. William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | Irish poetry | poetry | poetry | female poets | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | Richard Murphy | John Montague | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | round table discussion | poetry discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis | literary analysis

License

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | poetry | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Beyond the Limits of the Lyric (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Beyond the Limits of the Lyric (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we'll read individual poems closely within a set of questions about the moral and political position of poetry -- and of intellectuals -- in different cultural contexts. Of course, part of the divergence in the social positions of poetry [and of 'the aesthetic'] depends on the dominant paradigm of the social, political and literary culture; part of the divergence derives from the momentum of literary development in the culture [how did the culture experience modernism?, for instance], and part depends on the different attitudes toward traditional form. We read poets from North America (Whitman, Williams, Lowell, Plath, Bishop), from South America (Neruda), from Western Europe (Yeats), and Eastern Europe (Akhmatova, Szymborska); we conclude with a month dedicated to the w In this seminar we'll read individual poems closely within a set of questions about the moral and political position of poetry -- and of intellectuals -- in different cultural contexts. Of course, part of the divergence in the social positions of poetry [and of 'the aesthetic'] depends on the dominant paradigm of the social, political and literary culture; part of the divergence derives from the momentum of literary development in the culture [how did the culture experience modernism?, for instance], and part depends on the different attitudes toward traditional form. We read poets from North America (Whitman, Williams, Lowell, Plath, Bishop), from South America (Neruda), from Western Europe (Yeats), and Eastern Europe (Akhmatova, Szymborska); we conclude with a month dedicated to the w

Subjects

moral and political position of poetry | moral and political position of poetry | divergence in the social positions of poetry | divergence in the social positions of poetry | dominant paradigm of the social | political and literary culture | dominant paradigm of the social | political and literary culture | Whitman | Whitman | Williams | Williams | Lowell | Lowell | Plath | Plath | Bishop | Bishop | Czeslaw Milosz | Czeslaw Milosz | poet | poet | Yeats | Yeats | Nerud | Nerud | Akhmatova | Akhmatova | Szymborska | Szymborska

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples. This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

A chronological survey of lyric poetry in the English language by major writers, running from Beowulf to the end of the twentieth century. For instance: Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, Milton, Marvell, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Auden, others more recent. There will be some attention to longer poems but mostly we will be reading (and hearing) short works. The last two weeks of the semester will be devoted to works selected and presented by members of the class. Frequent reading aloud, two group presentations, four or five papers (two revised) totaling at least twenty pages of final draft. A chronological survey of lyric poetry in the English language by major writers, running from Beowulf to the end of the twentieth century. For instance: Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, Milton, Marvell, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Auden, others more recent. There will be some attention to longer poems but mostly we will be reading (and hearing) short works. The last two weeks of the semester will be devoted to works selected and presented by members of the class. Frequent reading aloud, two group presentations, four or five papers (two revised) totaling at least twenty pages of final draft.

Subjects

lyric poetry | lyric poetry | Beowulf | Beowulf | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Donne | Donne | Wroth | Wroth | Herbert | Herbert | Milton | Milton | Marvell | Marvell | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Whitman | Whitman | Dickinson | Dickinson | Yeats | Yeats | Frost | Frost | Stevens | Stevens | Eliot | Eliot | Auden | Auden

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.487 Modern Poetry (MIT) 21L.487 Modern Poetry (MIT)

Description

This course considers some of the substantial early twentieth-century poetic voices in America. Authors vary, but may include Moore, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Pound. We'll read the major poems by the most important poets in English in the 20th century, emphazinig especially the period between post-WWI disillusionment and early WW II internationalism (ca. 1918-1940). Our special focus this term will be how the concept of "the Image" evolved during this period. The War had undercut beliefs in master-narratives of nationalism and empire, and the language-systems that supported them (religious transcendence, rationalism and formalism). Retrieving energies from the Symbolist movements of the preceding century, early 20th century poets began to rethink how images carry information, and in wh This course considers some of the substantial early twentieth-century poetic voices in America. Authors vary, but may include Moore, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Pound. We'll read the major poems by the most important poets in English in the 20th century, emphazinig especially the period between post-WWI disillusionment and early WW II internationalism (ca. 1918-1940). Our special focus this term will be how the concept of "the Image" evolved during this period. The War had undercut beliefs in master-narratives of nationalism and empire, and the language-systems that supported them (religious transcendence, rationalism and formalism). Retrieving energies from the Symbolist movements of the preceding century, early 20th century poets began to rethink how images carry information, and in wh

Subjects

Modern | Modern | Poetry | Poetry | Poem | Poem | Woolf | Woolf | T. S. Eliot | T. S. Eliot | Tennyson | Tennyson | Owen | Owen | Pound | Pound | Yeats | Yeats | Hughes | Hughes | Toomer | Toomer | Literature | Literature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic. This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Fiction | Drama | Drama | Poetry | Poetry | Joyce | Joyce | Yeats | Yeats | Bolger | Bolger | Beckett | Beckett | O'Brien | O'Brien | Trevor | Trevor | Lavin | Lavin | McGahern | McGahern | Dorcey | Dorcey | Doyle | Doyle | Berkeley | Berkeley | Friel | Friel | Heaney | Heaney | Crotty | Crotty | Boland | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Meehan | Carr | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT)

Description

This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the

Subjects

literature | literature | lyric poetry | lyric poetry | poetic language | poetic language | figurative language | figurative language | Aristotle | Aristotle | literary theory | literary theory | history | history | early modern | early modern | metaphor | metaphor | science | science | renaissance | renaissance | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Donne | Donne | Marvell | Marvell | Milton | Milton | Romantic period | Romantic period | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Coleridge | Keats | Keats | early twentieth-century | early twentieth-century | Yeats | Yeats | T.S. Eliot | T.S. Eliot | Wallace Stevens | Wallace Stevens | Robert Frost | Robert Frost | Elizabeth Bishop | Elizabeth Bishop | Phillip Larkin | Phillip Larkin | poems | poems | normative | normative | literal | literal | literary criticism | literary criticism | critical method | critical method | interpretation | interpretation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

A chronological survey of lyric poetry in the English language by major writers, running from Beowulf to the end of the twentieth century. For instance: Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, Milton, Marvell, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Auden, others more recent. There will be some attention to longer poems but mostly we will be reading (and hearing) short works. The last two weeks of the semester will be devoted to works selected and presented by members of the class. Frequent reading aloud, two group presentations, four or five papers (two revised) totaling at least twenty pages of final draft.

Subjects

lyric poetry | Beowulf | Shakespeare | Donne | Wroth | Herbert | Milton | Marvell | Pope | Wordsworth | Keats | Whitman | Dickinson | Yeats | Frost | Stevens | Eliot | Auden

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Drama | Poetry | Joyce | Yeats | Bolger | Beckett | O'Brien | Trevor | Lavin | McGahern | Dorcey | Doyle | Berkeley | Friel | Heaney | Crotty | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | poetry | poets | English | Renaissance | modern | Shakespeare | sonnets | stanza-form | figurative language | metaphor | metonymy | meter | accent | duration | apostrophe | assonance | enjambment | chiasmus | hyperbole | litotes | Donne | metaphysical | Milton | Pope | Wordsworth | Keats | Yeats | Eliot | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Beyond the Limits of the Lyric (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we'll read individual poems closely within a set of questions about the moral and political position of poetry -- and of intellectuals -- in different cultural contexts. Of course, part of the divergence in the social positions of poetry [and of 'the aesthetic'] depends on the dominant paradigm of the social, political and literary culture; part of the divergence derives from the momentum of literary development in the culture [how did the culture experience modernism?, for instance], and part depends on the different attitudes toward traditional form. We read poets from North America (Whitman, Williams, Lowell, Plath, Bishop), from South America (Neruda), from Western Europe (Yeats), and Eastern Europe (Akhmatova, Szymborska); we conclude with a month dedicated to the w

Subjects

moral and political position of poetry | divergence in the social positions of poetry | dominant paradigm of the social | political and literary culture | Whitman | Williams | Lowell | Plath | Bishop | Czeslaw Milosz | poet | Yeats | Nerud | Akhmatova | Szymborska

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples.

Subjects

Literature | poetry | poets | English | Renaissance | modern | Shakespeare | sonnets | stanza-form | figurative language | metaphor | metonymy | meter | accent | duration | apostrophe | assonance | enjambment | chiasmus | hyperbole | litotes | Donne | metaphysical | Milton | Pope | Wordsworth | Keats | Yeats | Eliot | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.487 Modern Poetry (MIT)

Description

This course considers some of the substantial early twentieth-century poetic voices in America. Authors vary, but may include Moore, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Pound. We'll read the major poems by the most important poets in English in the 20th century, emphazinig especially the period between post-WWI disillusionment and early WW II internationalism (ca. 1918-1940). Our special focus this term will be how the concept of "the Image" evolved during this period. The War had undercut beliefs in master-narratives of nationalism and empire, and the language-systems that supported them (religious transcendence, rationalism and formalism). Retrieving energies from the Symbolist movements of the preceding century, early 20th century poets began to rethink how images carry information, and in wh

Subjects

Modern | Poetry | Poem | Woolf | T. S. Eliot | Tennyson | Owen | Pound | Yeats | Hughes | Toomer | Literature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Drama | Poetry | Joyce | Yeats | Bolger | Beckett | O'Brien | Trevor | Lavin | McGahern | Dorcey | Doyle | Berkeley | Friel | Heaney | Crotty | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT)

Description

This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the

Subjects

literature | lyric poetry | poetic language | figurative language | Aristotle | literary theory | history | early modern | metaphor | science | renaissance | seventeenth century | Shakespeare | Donne | Marvell | Milton | Romantic period | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Keats | early twentieth-century | Yeats | T.S. Eliot | Wallace Stevens | Robert Frost | Elizabeth Bishop | Phillip Larkin | poems | normative | literal | literary criticism | critical method | interpretation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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