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WGS.S10 Reproductive Politics in the United States (MIT) WGS.S10 Reproductive Politics in the United States (MIT)

Description

In this seminar, we will explore the significance of struggles over reproductive rights in the United States. Throughout the course, we will ask such questions as: What is reproductive freedom and why has attaining it been so central to women's liberation movements? Why have attempts to regulate reproduction been so prevalent in American politics? In this seminar, we will explore the significance of struggles over reproductive rights in the United States. Throughout the course, we will ask such questions as: What is reproductive freedom and why has attaining it been so central to women's liberation movements? Why have attempts to regulate reproduction been so prevalent in American politics?

Subjects

reproductive politics | reproductive politics | reproduction | reproduction | women's liberation | women's liberation | politics | politics | class | class | race | race | sexuality | sexuality | birth control | birth control | abortion | abortion | pregnancy | pregnancy | fetus | fetus | parenting | parenting

License

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WGS.645 Gender, Health and Marginalization Through a Critical Feminist Lens (MIT) WGS.645 Gender, Health and Marginalization Through a Critical Feminist Lens (MIT)

Description

In the course we will use a feminist interdisciplinary lens and invite students to look critically at how practices like privatization, shrinking public "safety nets", de-regulation, and the commodification of health services intersect inevitably with gender, race and class, for both men and women. We will draw on a blend of empirical studies, policy materials, films and guest speakers to examine specific health issues like menstrual health, corporate obstetrics, abortion, obesity, intersex, harassment and other forms of gendered violence, mental health and stress, parent-child attachment, as well as ethics and pharmaceuticals. The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS) This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's In the course we will use a feminist interdisciplinary lens and invite students to look critically at how practices like privatization, shrinking public "safety nets", de-regulation, and the commodification of health services intersect inevitably with gender, race and class, for both men and women. We will draw on a blend of empirical studies, policy materials, films and guest speakers to examine specific health issues like menstrual health, corporate obstetrics, abortion, obesity, intersex, harassment and other forms of gendered violence, mental health and stress, parent-child attachment, as well as ethics and pharmaceuticals. The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS) This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's

Subjects

gender | gender | health | health | marginalization | marginalization | feminist | feminist | neo-liberal | neo-liberal | menstrual health | menstrual health | corporate obstetrics | corporate obstetrics | abortion | abortion | obesity | obesity | intersex | intersex | harassment | harassment | mental health | mental health | stress | stress | parenting | parenting | ethics | ethics | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | women | women | men | men

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement Debate 1: Abortion

Description

The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement: Abortion. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | philosophy | abortion | religion | ethics | feminism | morality | uehiro | philosophy | abortion | religion | ethics | feminism | morality

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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SP.246 Current Events and Social Issues (MIT) SP.246 Current Events and Social Issues (MIT)

Description

The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from ar The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from ar

Subjects

Current Events | Current Events | Social Issues | Social Issues | Politics | Politics | War | War | Pornography | Pornography | Sexism | Sexism | Feminism | Feminism | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | marijuana policy | marijuana policy | drug policy | drug policy | social security | social security | discrimination | discrimination | racism | racism | outsourcing | outsourcing | arab-israeli conflict | arab-israeli conflict | abortion | abortion | rwanda | rwanda | genocide | genocide | civil disobedience | civil disobedience | ESG.SP246 | ESG.SP246

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT) 24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers. This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | 24.06 | STS.006 | STS.006 | medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | life support | life support | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | enhancing or cheating | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.151 Gender, Health, and Society (MIT) WGS.151 Gender, Health, and Society (MIT)

Description

This course draws on different disciplines, conceptual frameworks, and methodological approaches to examine gender in relation to health, including public health practice, epidemiologic research, health policy, and clinical application. It discusses a variety of health-related issues that illustrate global, international, domestic, and historical perspectives, while considering other social determinants of health as well, including social class and race. This course draws on different disciplines, conceptual frameworks, and methodological approaches to examine gender in relation to health, including public health practice, epidemiologic research, health policy, and clinical application. It discusses a variety of health-related issues that illustrate global, international, domestic, and historical perspectives, while considering other social determinants of health as well, including social class and race.

Subjects

gender | gender | health | health | society | society | public health | public health | epidemiology | epidemiology | cardiovascular disease | cardiovascular disease | hormone therapy | hormone therapy | contraceptives | contraceptives | sexually transmitted infection | sexually transmitted infection | pregnancy | pregnancy | birth | birth | mental health | mental health | motherhood | motherhood | biology | biology | abortion | abortion | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | gender identity | gender identity | global policy | global policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Gemini 6 Gemini 6

Description

Subjects

gemini | gemini | gemini6 | gemini6 | abort | abort | launch | launch | wallyschirra | wallyschirra | tomstafford | tomstafford

License

No known copyright restrictions

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered. This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | just society | values of liberty | values of liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | religious liberty | labor markets | labor markets | health care | health care | affirmative action | affirmative action | abortion | abortion | global justice | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.006J Bioethics (MIT) STS.006J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai

Subjects

medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | cross-cultural study | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | moral foundations | science | science | western bio-medicine | western bio-medicine | case studies | case studies | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | cloning | cloning | organ transplantation | organ transplantation | medical technologies | medical technologies | practice | practice | availability | availability | medical services | medical services | globe | globe | kinship | kinship | personhood | personhood | critique | critique | anthropological | anthropological | feminist | feminist | legal | legal | religious | religious | theorists. | theorists. | theorists | theorists | 21A.216 | 21A.216 | SP.622 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver

Subjects

John Stewart Mill | John Stewart Mill | | Jeremy Bentham | | | Jeremy Bentham | | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | justice | justice | abortion | abortion | supreme court | supreme court | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | 17.01 | 17.01 | 24.04 | 24.04

License

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT) HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered. This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered.

Subjects

clinical case | clinical case | physiology | physiology | endocrinology | endocrinology | pathology | pathology | human reproduction | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproductive technology | reproduction | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | abortion | abortion | menopause | menopause | contraception | contraception | reproductive biology | reproductive biology | menstrual cycle | menstrual cycle | fertility | fertility | impotence | impotence | anatomy | anatomy | sexual differentiation | sexual differentiation | sex | sex | pregnancy | pregnancy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT) 17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT)

Description

This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.   This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.  

Subjects

federal and state government | federal and state government | Supreme Court | Supreme Court | constitutional law | constitutional law | judicial review | judicial review | judicial interpretation | judicial interpretation | nation-state relations | nation-state relations | commerce clause | commerce clause | Congress | Congress | taxing and spending power | taxing and spending power | due process | due process | economic liberty | economic liberty | right to privacy | right to privacy | personal liberty | personal liberty | abortion | abortion | racial discrimination | racial discrimination | affirmative action | affirmative action | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | economic discrimination | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | same-sex marriage | same-sex marriage | voting | voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT) HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception.

Subjects

clinical case | clinical case | physiology | physiology | endocrinology | endocrinology | pathology | pathology | human reproduction | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproductive technology | reproduction | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | abortion | abortion | menopause | menopause | contraception | contraception

License

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21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

21A.302 | 21A.302 | WGS.271 | WGS.271 | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | medical technologies | medical technologies | biotechnologies | biotechnologies | halth | halth | sexuality | sexuality | morality | morality | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | end of life care | end of life care | healing practices | healing practices | anthropology | anthropology | medical experimentation | medical experimentation | sterilization | sterilization | Lynchburg | Lynchburg | biological citizenship | biological citizenship | clinical trials | clinical trials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.246 Current Events and Social Issues (MIT) ES.246 Current Events and Social Issues (MIT)

Description

The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from ar The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from ar

Subjects

Current Events | Current Events | Social Issues | Social Issues | Politics | Politics | War | War | Pornography | Pornography | Sexism | Sexism | Feminism | Feminism | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | marijuana policy | marijuana policy | drug policy | drug policy | social security | social security | discrimination | discrimination | racism | racism | outsourcing | outsourcing | arab-israeli conflict | arab-israeli conflict | abortion | abortion | rwanda | rwanda | genocide | genocide | civil disobedience | civil disobedience | ESG.SP246 | ESG.SP246

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Mobilization (MIT) Mobilization (MIT)

Description

This seminar is a space for collaborative inquiry into the relationships between social movements and the media. We'll review these relationships through the lens of social movement theory, and function as a workshop to develop student projects. Seminar participants will work together to explore frameworks, methods, and tools for understanding networked social movements in the digital media ecology. We will engage with social movement studies as a body of theoretical and empirical work, and learn about key concepts including: resource mobilization; political process; framing; New Social Movements; collective identity; tactical media; protest cycles; movement structure; and more. We'll explore methods of social movement investigation, examine new data sources and tools for movement analys This seminar is a space for collaborative inquiry into the relationships between social movements and the media. We'll review these relationships through the lens of social movement theory, and function as a workshop to develop student projects. Seminar participants will work together to explore frameworks, methods, and tools for understanding networked social movements in the digital media ecology. We will engage with social movement studies as a body of theoretical and empirical work, and learn about key concepts including: resource mobilization; political process; framing; New Social Movements; collective identity; tactical media; protest cycles; movement structure; and more. We'll explore methods of social movement investigation, examine new data sources and tools for movement analys

Subjects

movement | movement | occupy | occupy | society | society | network | network | protest | protest | power | power | politic | politic | crowd abortion | crowd abortion | capitalism | capitalism | democracy | democracy | justice | justice | ideology | ideology | framing | framing | identity | identity | transmedia revolt | transmedia revolt | globalism | globalism | feminism | feminism | twilight | twilight | civil | civil | change | change | lulz | lulz | anonymous | anonymous | remix | remix | disobedience | disobedience | buffy | buffy | cotinelpro | cotinelpro | internet | internet | tumblr | tumblr | resistance | resistance | tyrrany | tyrrany

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver

Subjects

John Stewart Mill | | Jeremy Bentham | | Jeremy Bentham | justice | abortion | supreme court | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | 17.01 | 24.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Mobilization (MIT)

Description

This seminar is a space for collaborative inquiry into the relationships between social movements and the media. We'll review these relationships through the lens of social movement theory, and function as a workshop to develop student projects. Seminar participants will work together to explore frameworks, methods, and tools for understanding networked social movements in the digital media ecology. We will engage with social movement studies as a body of theoretical and empirical work, and learn about key concepts including: resource mobilization; political process; framing; New Social Movements; collective identity; tactical media; protest cycles; movement structure; and more. We'll explore methods of social movement investigation, examine new data sources and tools for movement analys

Subjects

movement | occupy | society | network | protest | power | politic | crowd abortion | capitalism | democracy | justice | ideology | framing | identity | transmedia revolt | globalism | feminism | twilight | civil | change | lulz | anonymous | remix | disobedience | buffy | cotinelpro | internet | tumblr | resistance | tyrrany

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception.

Subjects

clinical case | physiology | endocrinology | pathology | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | abortion | menopause | contraception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | STS.006 | medical ethics | ethics | genetics | life support | stem cell | GM | genetically modified | genetic engineering | risk | biomedical | medicine | cloning | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | abortion | eugenics | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ donor | disease | public health | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Car striker begging (LOC)

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Subjects

newyork | subway | crowd | strike | libraryofcongress | carmen | presbyterian | 1916 | labortemple | xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 | dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain22890 | americaninternationalchurch

License

No known copyright restrictions

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered.

Subjects

clinical case | physiology | endocrinology | pathology | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | abortion | menopause | contraception | reproductive biology | menstrual cycle | fertility | impotence | anatomy | sexual differentiation | sex | pregnancy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.246 Current Events and Social Issues (MIT)

Description

The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from ar

Subjects

Current Events | Social Issues | Politics | War | Pornography | Sexism | Feminism | criminal punishment | marijuana policy | drug policy | social security | discrimination | racism | outsourcing | arab-israeli conflict | abortion | rwanda | genocide | civil disobedience | ESG.SP246

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.151 Gender, Health, and Society (MIT)

Description

This course draws on different disciplines, conceptual frameworks, and methodological approaches to examine gender in relation to health, including public health practice, epidemiologic research, health policy, and clinical application. It discusses a variety of health-related issues that illustrate global, international, domestic, and historical perspectives, while considering other social determinants of health as well, including social class and race.

Subjects

gender | health | society | public health | epidemiology | cardiovascular disease | hormone therapy | contraceptives | sexually transmitted infection | pregnancy | birth | mental health | motherhood | biology | abortion | sexual orientation | gender identity | global policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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