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6.092 Introduction to Software Engineering in Java (MIT) 6.092 Introduction to Software Engineering in Java (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to Java™ programming and software engineering. It is designed for those who have little or no programming experience in Java and covers concepts useful to 6.005. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java, and how to use 3rd party libraries to get more done with less work. Each session includes one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. Short labs are assigned with each lecture.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course is an introduction to Java™ programming and software engineering. It is designed for those who have little or no programming experience in Java and covers concepts useful to 6.005. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java, and how to use 3rd party libraries to get more done with less work. Each session includes one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. Short labs are assigned with each lecture.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

java; software engineering; programming; introductory programming; object oriented programming; software design; methods; conditionals; loops; arrays; objects; classes; inheritance; abstraction; design; exceptions; eclipse; testing; unit testing; debugging; programming style | java; software engineering; programming; introductory programming; object oriented programming; software design; methods; conditionals; loops; arrays; objects; classes; inheritance; abstraction; design; exceptions; eclipse; testing; unit testing; debugging; programming style | java | java | software engineering | software engineering | programming | programming | introductory programming | introductory programming | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | software design | software design | methods | methods | conditionals | conditionals | loops | loops | arrays | arrays | objects | objects | classes | classes | inheritance | inheritance | abstraction | abstraction | design | design | exceptions | exceptions | eclipse | eclipse | testing | testing | unit testing | unit testing | debugging | debugging | programming style | programming style

License

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6.170 Laboratory in Software Engineering (MIT) 6.170 Laboratory in Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course is a a core electrical engineering computer science subject at MIT. It introduces concepts and techniques relevant to the production of large software systems. Students are taught a programming method based on the recognition and description of useful abstractions. Topics include: modularity; specification; data abstraction; object modeling; design patterns; and testing. Several programming projects of varying size undertaken by students working individually and in groups. This course is a a core electrical engineering computer science subject at MIT. It introduces concepts and techniques relevant to the production of large software systems. Students are taught a programming method based on the recognition and description of useful abstractions. Topics include: modularity; specification; data abstraction; object modeling; design patterns; and testing. Several programming projects of varying size undertaken by students working individually and in groups.

Subjects

software development | modularity | specification; data abstraction; object modeling | design patterns | software development | modularity | specification; data abstraction; object modeling | design patterns | modularity | modularity | software development | software development | specification | specification | data abstraction | data abstraction | software design | software design | object modeling | object modeling | software testing | software testing | large systems | large systems

License

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Poin Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Poin

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | digital abstraction | amplifiers | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.093 Information Exploration: Becoming a Savvy Scholar (MIT) 3.093 Information Exploration: Becoming a Savvy Scholar (MIT)

Description

This freshman course explores the scientific publication cycle, primary vs. secondary sources, and online and in-print bibliographic databases; how to search, find, evaluate, and cite information; indexing and abstracting; using special resources (e.g. patents) and "grey literature" (e.g. technical reports and conference proceedings); conducting Web searches; and constructing literature reviews. This freshman course explores the scientific publication cycle, primary vs. secondary sources, and online and in-print bibliographic databases; how to search, find, evaluate, and cite information; indexing and abstracting; using special resources (e.g. patents) and "grey literature" (e.g. technical reports and conference proceedings); conducting Web searches; and constructing literature reviews.

Subjects

library research | library research | library | library | citation | citation | scholarship | scholarship | sources | sources | peer review | peer review | scholarly publication | scholarly publication | indexing | indexing | index | index | abstracting | abstracting | abstract | abstract | search strategy | search strategy | literature review | literature review | vetting | vetting | fact checking | fact checking | keyword | keyword

License

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | digital abstraction | amplifiers | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Readme file for Object-Oriented Software Design

Description

This readme file contains details of links to all the Object-Oriented Software Design module's material held on Jorum and information about the module as well.

Subjects

ukoer | class design | queues | linked lists | object-oriented software design process | object oriented design process | java notes | java practical | java reading material | object-oriented design process reading material | object-oriented software design process lecture | object-oriented software design process reading material | array lecture | linked list lecture | queue lecture | design reading material | class design reading material | class design lecture | case study | classes lecture | objects lecture | gui lecture | software design pattern lecture | inheritance reading material | polymorphism reading material | inheritance lecture | polymorphism | java object serialization reading material | data file lecture | java | review of java | introduction to java | arrays | object-oriented design process | testing | java classes | java objects | inheritance | abstract classes | gui | software design | java object serialization | object-oriented software design | java class | java object | class testing | introduction to java reading material | introduction to java practical | introduction to java lecture | review of java reading material | review of java practical | review of java lecture | java lecture | object-oriented design process practical | object-oriented design process lecture | object oriented design process reading material | object oriented design process practical | object oriented design process lecture | object-oriented software design process practical | object oriented software design process reading material | object oriented software design process practical | object oriented software design process lecture | arrays reading material | arrays practical | arrays lecture | linked lists reading material | linked lists practical | linked lists lecture | queues reading material | queues practical | queues lecture | class design practical | testing reading material | testing practical | testing lecture | java classes reading material | java classes practical | java classes lecture | java objects reading material | java objects practical | java objects lecture | inheritance practical | abstract classes reading material | abstract classes practical | abstract classes lecture | gui reading material | gui practical | software design reading material | software design practical | software design lecture | polymorphism practical | polymorphism lecture | java object serialization lecture | object-oriented software design reading material | object-oriented software design practical | object-oriented software design lecture | object oriented software design lecture | java class reading material | java class practical | java class lecture | java object reading material | java object lecture | class testing reading material | class testing practical | class testing lecture | java object practical | g400 | oosd | g400 reading material | g400 practical | g400 lecture | oosd reading material | oosd practical | oosd lecture | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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18.100A Analysis I (MIT) 18.100A Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I (18.100) in its various versions covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: continuity, differentiability, some form of the Riemann integral, sequences and series of numbers and functions, uniform convergence with applications to interchange of limit operations, some point-set topology, including some work in Euclidean n-space. MIT students may choose to take one of three versions of 18.100: Option A (18.100A) chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B (18.100B) is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis from the beginning on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with analysis on the real line, saving for the last weeks work in 2-space (the pla Analysis I (18.100) in its various versions covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: continuity, differentiability, some form of the Riemann integral, sequences and series of numbers and functions, uniform convergence with applications to interchange of limit operations, some point-set topology, including some work in Euclidean n-space. MIT students may choose to take one of three versions of 18.100: Option A (18.100A) chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B (18.100B) is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis from the beginning on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with analysis on the real line, saving for the last weeks work in 2-space (the pla

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | convergence of series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Riemann integral | Riemann integral | sequences and series of functions | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | construction of proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.01 Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science I (MIT) 6.01 Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science I (MIT)

Description

6.01 explores fundamental ideas in electrical engineering and computer science, in the context of working with mobile robots. Key engineering principles, such as abstraction and modularity, are applied in the design of computer programs, electronic circuits, discrete-time controllers, and noisy and/or uncertain systems. 6.01 explores fundamental ideas in electrical engineering and computer science, in the context of working with mobile robots. Key engineering principles, such as abstraction and modularity, are applied in the design of computer programs, electronic circuits, discrete-time controllers, and noisy and/or uncertain systems.

Subjects

robots | robots | python | python | computer programs | computer programs | circuits | circuits | systems | systems | inheritance | inheritance | recursion | recursion | functional programming | functional programming | signals | signals | control | control | circuit abstractions | circuit abstractions | probability | probability | discrete probability | discrete probability | search algorithms | search algorithms | state machines | state machines | probabilistic state estimation | probabilistic state estimation | decision-making | decision-making | search | search | python robots | python robots

License

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18.100B Analysis I (MIT) 18.100B Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, and interchange of limit operations. Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, and interchange of limit operations.

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | convergence of series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Riemann integral | Riemann integral | sequences and series of functions | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | construction of proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design | FPGA | FPGA | counters | counters | timing | timing | synchronization | synchronization | digital filters | digital filters | wireless communications | wireless communications | verilog | verilog | combinational logic | combinational logic | simple sequential circuits | simple sequential circuits | memories | memories | configurable logic | configurable logic

License

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6.092 Introduction to Software Engineering in Java (MIT) 6.092 Introduction to Software Engineering in Java (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to software engineering, using the Java™ programming language; it covers concepts useful to 6.005. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java, and how to use 3rd party libraries to get more done with less work. The class is designed for students with some programming experience, but if you have none and are motivated you will do fine. Students who have taken 6.170 or 6.005 should not take this course. Each session includes one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. Short labs are assigned with each lecture.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of Januar This course is an introduction to software engineering, using the Java™ programming language; it covers concepts useful to 6.005. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java, and how to use 3rd party libraries to get more done with less work. The class is designed for students with some programming experience, but if you have none and are motivated you will do fine. Students who have taken 6.170 or 6.005 should not take this course. Each session includes one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. Short labs are assigned with each lecture.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of Januar

Subjects

java | java | software engineering | software engineering | programming | programming | introductory programming | introductory programming | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | software design | software design | methods | methods | conditionals | conditionals | loops | loops | arrays | arrays | objects | objects | classes | classes | inheritance | inheritance | abstraction | abstraction | design | design | exceptions | exceptions | belote | belote | social network | social network | chat client and server | chat client and server

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

circuit | circuit | electronic | electronic | abstraction | abstraction | lumped circuit | lumped circuit | digital | digital | amplifier | amplifier | differential equations | differential equations | time behavior | time behavior | energy storage | energy storage | semiconductor diode | semiconductor diode | field-effect | field-effect | field-effect transistor | field-effect transistor | resistor | resistor | source | source | inductor | inductor | capacitor | capacitor | diode | diode | series-parallel reduction | series-parallel reduction | voltage | voltage | current divider | current divider | node method | node method | linearity | linearity | superposition | superposition | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | power flow | power flow | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | binary signal | binary signal | MOSFET | MOSFET | noise margin | noise margin | singularity functions | singularity functions | sinusoidal-steady-state | sinusoidal-steady-state | impedance | impedance | frequency response curves | frequency response curves | operational amplifier | operational amplifier | Op-Amp | Op-Amp | negative feedback | negative feedback | positive feedback | positive feedback

License

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6.824 Distributed Computer Systems (MIT) 6.824 Distributed Computer Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers abstractions and implementation techniques for the design of distributed systems. Topics include: server design, network programming, naming, storage systems, security, and fault tolerance. The assigned readings for the course are from current literature. This course is worth 6 Engineering Design Points. This course covers abstractions and implementation techniques for the design of distributed systems. Topics include: server design, network programming, naming, storage systems, security, and fault tolerance. The assigned readings for the course are from current literature. This course is worth 6 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | abstractions | abstractions | server design | server design | network programming | network programming | naming | naming | storage systems | storage systems | security | security | fault tolerance | fault tolerance | C++ | C++

License

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18.100B Analysis I (MIT) 18.100B Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations. MIT students may choose to take one of the two versions of 18.100. Option A chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with the real line. Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations. MIT students may choose to take one of the two versions of 18.100. Option A chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with the real line.

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | convergence of series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Reimann integral | Reimann integral | sequences and series of functions | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | construction of proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space | sequences of functions | sequences of functions | series of functions | series of functions | applications | applications | real variable | real variable | metric space | metric space | sets | sets | theorems | theorems | differentiate | differentiate | differentiable | differentiable | converge | converge | uniform | uniform | 18.100 | 18.100

License

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT) 6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsScheme software is required to run the .scm files found on this course site. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsScheme software is required to run the .scm files found on this course site.

Subjects

programming | programming | Scheme | Scheme | abstraction | abstraction | recursion | recursion | iteration | iteration | object oriented | object oriented | structure | structure | interpretation | interpretation | computer programs | computer programs | languages | languages | procedures | procedures

License

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4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT) 4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling. This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | video recording | video recording | editing | editing | self-exploration | self-exploration | performance | performance | social critique | social critique | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | narrative | narrative | abstract | abstract | documentary | documentary | essay | essay | video capture | video capture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.033 Computer System Engineering (MIT) 6.033 Computer System Engineering (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers topics on the engineering of computer software and hardware systems: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; recovery and reliability; privacy, security, and encryption; and impact of computer systems on society. Case studies of working systems and readings from the current literature provide comparisons and contrasts. Two design projects are required, and students engage in extensive written communication exercises. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers topics on the engineering of computer software and hardware systems: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; recovery and reliability; privacy, security, and encryption; and impact of computer systems on society. Case studies of working systems and readings from the current literature provide comparisons and contrasts. Two design projects are required, and students engage in extensive written communication exercises.

Subjects

computer systems | computer systems | systems design | systems design | complexity | complexity | abstractions | abstractions | modularity | modularity | client server | client server | operating system | operating system | performance | performance | networks | networks | layering | layering | routing | routing | congestion control | congestion control | reliability | reliability | atomicity | atomicity | isolation | isolation | security | security | authentication | authentication | cryptography | cryptography | therac 25 | therac 25 | unix | unix | mapreduce | mapreduce | architecture of complexity | architecture of complexity | trusting trust | trusting trust | computer system design | computer system design

License

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6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT) 6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces students to the principles of computation. Upon completion of 6.001, students should be able to explain and apply the basic methods from programming languages to analyze computational systems, and to generate computational solutions to abstract problems. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the course. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

programming | programming | Scheme | Scheme | abstraction | abstraction | recursion | recursion | iteration | iteration | object oriented | object oriented | structure | structure | interpretation | interpretation | computer programs | computer programs | languages | languages | procedures | procedures

License

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1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT) 1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J. This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J.

Subjects

modern software development | modern software development | engineering and information technology | engineering and information technology | component-based software | component-based software | C# | C# | .NET | .NET | data structures | data structures | algorithms for modeling | algorithms for modeling | analysis | analysis | visualization | visualization | basic problem-solving techniques | basic problem-solving techniques | web services | web services | management and maintenance of software | management and maintenance of software | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | algorithms | algorithms | numerical simulation techniques | numerical simulation techniques | image processing | image processing | computational geometry | computational geometry | finite element methods | finite element methods | network methods | network methods | e-business applications | e-business applications | classes | classes | objects | objects | inheritance | inheritance | virtual functions | virtual functions | abstract classes | abstract classes | polymorphism | polymorphism | Java applications | Java applications | applets | applets | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Graphics | Graphics | Threads | Threads | Java | Java | C++ | C++ | information technology | information technology | engineering | engineering | modeling algorithms | modeling algorithms | basic problem-solving | basic problem-solving | software management | software management | software maintenance | software maintenance | searching algorithms | searching algorithms | numerical simulation | numerical simulation | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | 13.470J | 13.470J | 1.124 | 1.124 | 2.159 | 2.159 | 13.470 | 13.470

License

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6.088 Introduction to C Memory Management and C++ Object-Oriented Programming (MIT) 6.088 Introduction to C Memory Management and C++ Object-Oriented Programming (MIT)

Description

Ever hang your head in shame after your Python program wasn't as fast as your friend's C program? Ever wish you could use objects without having to use Java? Join us for this fun introduction to C and C++! We will take you through a tour that will start with writing simple C programs, go deep into the caves of C memory manipulation, resurface with an introduction to using C++ classes, dive deeper into advanced C++ class use and the C++ Standard Template Libraries. We'll wrap up by teaching you some tricks of the trade that you may need for tech interviews. We see this as a "C/C++ empowerment" course: we want you to come away understanding why you would want to use C over another language (control over memory, probably for performance reasons), why you would want to use C++ ra Ever hang your head in shame after your Python program wasn't as fast as your friend's C program? Ever wish you could use objects without having to use Java? Join us for this fun introduction to C and C++! We will take you through a tour that will start with writing simple C programs, go deep into the caves of C memory manipulation, resurface with an introduction to using C++ classes, dive deeper into advanced C++ class use and the C++ Standard Template Libraries. We'll wrap up by teaching you some tricks of the trade that you may need for tech interviews. We see this as a "C/C++ empowerment" course: we want you to come away understanding why you would want to use C over another language (control over memory, probably for performance reasons), why you would want to use C++ ra

Subjects

C | C | C++ | C++ | programming languages | programming languages | abstraction | abstraction | memory management | memory management | speed | speed | pointers | pointers | structs | structs | memory manipulation | memory manipulation | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | oop | oop | objects | objects | encapsulation | encapsulation | classes | classes | input | input | output | output | inheritance | inheritance | polymorphism | polymorphism | templates | templates | standard library | standard library | binary search tree | binary search tree | arithmetic expression | arithmetic expression | eval | eval | print | print

License

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6.005 Elements of Software Construction (MIT) 6.005 Elements of Software Construction (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and techniques of software development that have greatest impact on practice. Topics include capturing the essence of a problem by recognizing and inventing suitable abstractions; key paradigms, including state machines, functional programming, and object-oriented programming; use of design patterns to bridge gap between models and code; the role of interfaces and specification in achieving modularity and decoupling; reasoning about code using invariants; testing, test-case generation and coverage; and essentials of programming with objects, functions, and abstract types. The course includes exercises in modeling, design, implementation and reasoning. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and techniques of software development that have greatest impact on practice. Topics include capturing the essence of a problem by recognizing and inventing suitable abstractions; key paradigms, including state machines, functional programming, and object-oriented programming; use of design patterns to bridge gap between models and code; the role of interfaces and specification in achieving modularity and decoupling; reasoning about code using invariants; testing, test-case generation and coverage; and essentials of programming with objects, functions, and abstract types. The course includes exercises in modeling, design, implementation and reasoning.

Subjects

software development | software development | java programming | java programming | java | java | invariants | invariants | decoupling | decoupling | data abstraction | data abstraction | state machine | state machine | module dependency | module dependency | object model | object model | model view controller | model view controller | mvc | mvc | client server | client server | eclipse | eclipse | junit | junit | subversion | subversion | swing | swing | design | design | implement | implement | midi player | midi player | sat solver | sat solver | photo organizer | photo organizer | testing | testing | coverage | coverage | event based programming | event based programming | concurrency | concurrency

License

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA. 6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design | FPGA | FPGA | counters | counters | timing | timing | synchronization | synchronization | digital filters | digital filters | wireless communications | wireless communications | verilog | verilog

License

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6.883 Program Analysis (MIT) 6.883 Program Analysis (MIT)

Description

6.883 is a graduate seminar that investigates a variety of program analysis techniques that address software engineering tasks. Static analysis topics include abstract interpretation (dataflow), type systems, model checking, decision procedures (SAT, BDDs), theorem-proving. Dynamic analysis topics include testing, fault isolation (debugging), model inference, and visualization. While the course focuses on the design and implementation of programming tools, the material will be useful to anyone who wishes to improve his or her programming or understand the state of the art. Students are expected to read classic and current technical papers, actively participate in class discussion, perform small exercises that provide experience with a variety of tools, and complete a team research project. 6.883 is a graduate seminar that investigates a variety of program analysis techniques that address software engineering tasks. Static analysis topics include abstract interpretation (dataflow), type systems, model checking, decision procedures (SAT, BDDs), theorem-proving. Dynamic analysis topics include testing, fault isolation (debugging), model inference, and visualization. While the course focuses on the design and implementation of programming tools, the material will be useful to anyone who wishes to improve his or her programming or understand the state of the art. Students are expected to read classic and current technical papers, actively participate in class discussion, perform small exercises that provide experience with a variety of tools, and complete a team research project.

Subjects

program analysis | program analysis | static analysis | static analysis | abstract interpretation (dataflow) | abstract interpretation (dataflow) | type systems | type systems | model checking | model checking | decision procedures (SAT | decision procedures (SAT | BDDs) | BDDs) | theorem-proving | theorem-proving | dynamic analysis | dynamic analysis | testing | testing | fault isolation (debugging) | fault isolation (debugging) | model inference | and visualization | model inference | and visualization | decision procedures (SAT | BDDs) | decision procedures (SAT | BDDs)

License

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6.170 Laboratory in Software Engineering (MIT) 6.170 Laboratory in Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course introduces concepts and techniques relevant to the production of large software systems. Students are taught a programming method based on the recognition and description of useful abstractions. Topics include modularity, specification, data abstraction, object modeling, design patterns, and testing. Students complete several programming projects of varying size, working individually and in groups. Students are now introduced to software engineering in 6.005 Elements of Software Construction, which is available on OCW in two versions, as taught in Fall 2008 and Fall 2011. This course introduces concepts and techniques relevant to the production of large software systems. Students are taught a programming method based on the recognition and description of useful abstractions. Topics include modularity, specification, data abstraction, object modeling, design patterns, and testing. Students complete several programming projects of varying size, working individually and in groups. Students are now introduced to software engineering in 6.005 Elements of Software Construction, which is available on OCW in two versions, as taught in Fall 2008 and Fall 2011.

Subjects

software engineering | software engineering | modularity | modularity | specification | specification | data abstraction | data abstraction | object modeling | object modeling | design patterns | design patterns | testing | testing | Java programming | Java programming

License

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6.092 Java Preparation for 6.170 (MIT) 6.092 Java Preparation for 6.170 (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on introducing the language, libraries, tools and concepts of JavaTM. The course is specifically targeted at students who intend to take 6.170 in the following term and feel they would struggle because they lack the necessary background. Topics include: Object-oriented programming, primitives, arrays, objects, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, hashing, data structures, collections, nested classes, floating point precision, defensive programming, and depth-first search algorithm. This course focuses on introducing the language, libraries, tools and concepts of JavaTM. The course is specifically targeted at students who intend to take 6.170 in the following term and feel they would struggle because they lack the necessary background. Topics include: Object-oriented programming, primitives, arrays, objects, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, hashing, data structures, collections, nested classes, floating point precision, defensive programming, and depth-first search algorithm.

Subjects

Object oriented programming | Object oriented programming | Java program structure | Java program structure | class file | main | methods | fields | class file | main | methods | fields | Primitives | Primitives | Control flow | method calls | if/then | for loop | while loop | Control flow | method calls | if/then | for loop | while loop | Arrays | Arrays | Objects | declaration | assignment | mutation | scope | Objects | declaration | assignment | mutation | scope | Classes vs Objects/Instances | Classes vs Objects/Instances | Method Overloading | Method Overloading | Inheritence | Inheritence | Abstract superclasses | Abstract superclasses | Interfaces | Interfaces | Polymorphism | Polymorphism | Method Overriding | Method Overriding | Hashing | Hashing | Data structures | Data structures | Collections | Collections | Advanced control flow | Advanced control flow | Writing interfaces | abstract classes | Writing interfaces | abstract classes | True subtyping | composite | True subtyping | composite | Throwing and catching exceptions | Throwing and catching exceptions | Nested classes | Nested classes | Floating point precision | Floating point precision | Defensive programming | Defensive programming | Depth First Search alogithm | Depth First Search alogithm

License

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