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3.987 Human Origins and Evolution (MIT) 3.987 Human Origins and Evolution (MIT)

Description

This course examines the dynamic interrelations among physical and behavioral traits of humans, environment, and culture to provide an integrated framework for studying human biological evolution and modern diversity. Topics include issues in morphological evolution and adaptation; fossil and cultural evidence for human evolution from earliest times through the Pleistocene; evolution of tool use and social behavior; modern human variation and concepts of race. The class also studies stone artifacts and fossil specimens. This course examines the dynamic interrelations among physical and behavioral traits of humans, environment, and culture to provide an integrated framework for studying human biological evolution and modern diversity. Topics include issues in morphological evolution and adaptation; fossil and cultural evidence for human evolution from earliest times through the Pleistocene; evolution of tool use and social behavior; modern human variation and concepts of race. The class also studies stone artifacts and fossil specimens.

Subjects

cultural evolution | pre-hominid | hominid | Pleistocene adaptations | morphological variation | race | agriculture | urbanization | paleontology | archaeology | Oligocene | Miocene | Homo | Homo erectus | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo sapiens | fossil | cultural evolution | pre-hominid | hominid | Pleistocene adaptations | morphological variation | race | agriculture | urbanization | paleontology | archaeology | Oligocene | Miocene | Homo | Homo erectus | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo sapiens | fossil | cultural evolution | cultural evolution | pre-hominid | pre-hominid | hominid | hominid | Pleistocene adaptations | Pleistocene adaptations | morphological variation | morphological variation | race | race | agriculture | agriculture | urbanization | urbanization | paleontology | paleontology | archaeology | archaeology | Oligocene | Oligocene | Miocene | Miocene | Homo | Homo | Homo erectus | Homo erectus | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo heidelbergensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo neanderthalensis | Homo sapiens | Homo sapiens | fossil | fossil

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Adapting Greek Tragedy Adapting Greek Tragedy

Description

Fiona Macintosh talks with distinguished playwright Frank McGuinness about his work in adapting Greek tragedies for modern theatre, particularly Antigone and The Medea. Fiona Macintosh talks with distinguished playwright Frank McGuinness about his work in adapting Greek tragedies for modern theatre, particularly Antigone and The Medea.

Subjects

literature | literature | Euripides | Euripides | theatre | theatre | Medea | Medea | Antigone | Antigone | tragedy | tragedy | adaptation | adaptation | classics | classics | Sophocles | Sophocles | Bag Lady | Bag Lady | literature | Euripides | theatre | Medea | Antigone | tragedy | adaptation | classics | Sophocles | Bag Lady | 2009-11-24 | literature | Euripides | theatre | Medea | Antigone | tragedy | adaptation | classics | Sophocles | Bag Lady | 2009-11-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Resilience and adaptation in complex city systems

Description

James Simmie (Department of Planning, Oxford Brookes University) develops an evolutionary economics approach to adaptation and change in urban economies. Abstract: In this lecture, James Simmie develops one of the evolutionary economics approaches to understanding adaptation and change in the economic trajectories of urban economies. Neo-classical equilibrist versions of resilience and adaptation are rejected in favour of an evolutionary perspective. He argues in particular for an explanation based on why and how local economies adapt through time both to continual mutations and to periodic gales of creative destruction. Simmie focuses on the extent to which the "panarchy" conceptual framework can suggest testable hypotheses concerning urban and regional resilience. He explores some of

Subjects

Future | cities | urban policy and planning | resilience | adaptation | flexibility | economics | 2010-10-18 | ukoer | Future | cities | urban policy and planning | resilience | adaptation | flexibility | economics | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Interview with Laurie Newton

Description

Interview with Laurie Newton, UKCIP Local Authorities Projects Officer, on some of the factors and events which have made adaptation to climate change more important for public policy like the flooding in 2009 and other extreme weather events

Subjects

UKCIP | climate change | adaptation | mitigation | local authorities | climate impacts program | environmentalism | ukoer | UKCIP | climate change | adaptation | mitigation | local authorities | climate impacts program | environmentalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Interview with Chris West

Description

Interview with the Director of the UK Climate Impacts Programme, Chris West, where he talks about UKCIP's role in helping governments and private organisations make plans to adapt to inevitable climate change

Subjects

UKCIP | climate change | adaptation | mitigation | climate impacts program | environmentalism | ukoer | UKCIP | climate change | adaptation | mitigation | climate impacts program | environmentalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Introduction to the UK Climate Impacts Program

Description

Chris West, Director of the UK Climate Impacts Program, gives an introduction to UKCIP, its history and the reason why it stresses the importance of climate change adaptation, rather than climate change mitigation. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change | UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Climate Science

Description

Alastair Brown explains what climate science is, what the difference between weather and climate, how the scientists model the climate and what range of factors are considered in modelling climate. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

climate modelling | climate science | UKCIP | climate impacts program | mitigation | adaptation | climate change | weather | climate modelling | climate science | UKCIP | climate impacts program | mitigation | adaptation | climate change | weather

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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How can you adapt?

Description

Some climate change is inevitable, Megan Gawith talks about the need for organisations and individuals to adapt to climate change. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change | UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Business

Description

Kay Johnstone talks about why climate change is an issue as much for businesses as it is for governments and also some of the ways in which businesses can adapt to climate change. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

business | UKCIP | climate impacts program | mitigation | adaptation | climate change | business | UKCIP | climate impacts program | mitigation | adaptation | climate change

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Local Authorities

Description

Laurie Newton talks about the need for local authorities to adapt to climate change and some of the resources which are available to help Local Authorities understand adaptation. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

UKCIP | climate impacts program | mitigation | adaptation | climate change | local authorities | UKCIP | climate impacts program | mitigation | adaptation | climate change | local authorities

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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UKCP 09 - UK Climate Projections 2009

Description

Richard Lamb gives an introduction to the history of climate projections in the UK, he also describes the different levels of information available to organisations and individuals through UKCP 09. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change | UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The UKCIP user interface

Description

Tom Wilson gives an introduction to the UK Climate Impacts Program user interface, where individuals are able to create climate future projections for different areas of the UK. He also demonstrates how the user interface works. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change | UKCIP | mitigation | adaptation | climate impacts program | climate change

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing. In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction, and Drama (MIT) 21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction, and Drama (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works read include Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Marsh, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature read in translation. Taught in English. This course is an introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works read include Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Marsh, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature read in translation. Taught in English.

Subjects

chinese poetry | chinese poetry | chinese culture | chinese culture | chinese | chinese | novel | novel | the story of the western wing | the story of the western wing | three kingdoms | three kingdoms | outlaws of the marsh | outlaws of the marsh | the journey to the west | the journey to the west | the story of the stone | the story of the stone | monkey | monkey | film adaptation | film adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Life Support (MIT) Life Support (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of human performance, physiology, and life support impacting engineering design and aerospace systems. Topics include: effects of gravity on the muscle, skeletal, cardiovascular, and neurovestibular systems; human/pilot modeling and human/machine design; flight experiment design; and life support engineering for extravehicular activity (EVA). Case studies of current research are presented. Assignments include a design project, quantitative homework sets, and quizzes emphasizing engineering and systems aspects.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. Fundamentals of human performance, physiology, and life support impacting engineering design and aerospace systems. Topics include: effects of gravity on the muscle, skeletal, cardiovascular, and neurovestibular systems; human/pilot modeling and human/machine design; flight experiment design; and life support engineering for extravehicular activity (EVA). Case studies of current research are presented. Assignments include a design project, quantitative homework sets, and quizzes emphasizing engineering and systems aspects.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

physiological adaptation | physiological adaptation | weightlessness | weightlessness | human space flight | human space flight | bone mechanics | bone mechanics | muscle mechanics | muscle mechanics | musculoskeletal dynamics | musculoskeletal dynamics | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular system | neurovestibular system | neurovestibular system | extravehicular activity | extravehicular activity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT) 9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT)

Description

This course will sample the broad diversity of animal behavior and the behavioral adaptation of animals to the environments in which they live. This will include discussion of both field observations and controlled laboratory experiments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison of behavior within an evolutionary framework, animal cognition, and on the genetic, neural, and hormonal mechanisms underlying behavior. This course will sample the broad diversity of animal behavior and the behavioral adaptation of animals to the environments in which they live. This will include discussion of both field observations and controlled laboratory experiments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison of behavior within an evolutionary framework, animal cognition, and on the genetic, neural, and hormonal mechanisms underlying behavior.

Subjects

behavior | behavior | adaptation | adaptation | habits | habits | environment | environment | hormonal mechanisms | hormonal mechanisms | neural | neural | genetic | genetic | animal cognition | animal cognition | evolution | evolution | field observations | field observations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.036 The Visual System (MIT) 9.036 The Visual System (MIT)

Description

In this seminar anatomical, neurophysiological, imaging and behavioral research will be examined in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how information is processed in the primate visual system. The first five sessions provide an overview of the functional and structural organization of the visual system with a critical examination of some of the basic issues in the field. Thereafter the emphasis will shift to the question of how various aspects of the visual scene are processed in the visual system. We will study color vision, adaptation, the role of eye movements in carrying out visual analysis, motion perception, depth perception and pattern perception. In this seminar anatomical, neurophysiological, imaging and behavioral research will be examined in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how information is processed in the primate visual system. The first five sessions provide an overview of the functional and structural organization of the visual system with a critical examination of some of the basic issues in the field. Thereafter the emphasis will shift to the question of how various aspects of the visual scene are processed in the visual system. We will study color vision, adaptation, the role of eye movements in carrying out visual analysis, motion perception, depth perception and pattern perception.

Subjects

anatomical | anatomical | neurophysiological | neurophysiological | imaging | imaging | behavior | behavior | functional | functional | structural organization | structural organization | visual scene | visual scene | processing | processing | visual system | visual system | color vision | color vision | adaptation | adaptation | eye movements | eye movements | motion perception | motion perception | depth perception | depth perception | pattern perception | pattern perception | visual analysis | visual analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How to eat an Elephant: Why Climate Change Policy is in a Mess and How to Fix it

Description

For more than two decades, Professor Steve Rayner has led interdisciplinary research programmes on science technology and environment, specifically on global climate change. He is the co-author of a number of controversial articles on climate change policy including 'Zen and the Art of Carbon Cycle Maintenance', 'Lifting the Taboo on Adaptation' and 'Time to Ditch Kyoto', all published in the journal Nature. Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor of Science and Civilization, Professorial Fellow of Keble College, and Director of the Institute for Science Innovation and Society Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

climate change | alumni | global warming | adaptation | kyoto protocol | carbon emissions | climate change | alumni | global warming | adaptation | kyoto protocol | carbon emissions | 2012-09-16

License

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How to eat an Elephant: Why Climate Change Policy is in a Mess and How to Fix it

Description

For more than two decades, Professor Steve Rayner has led interdisciplinary research programmes on science technology and environment, specifically on global climate change. He is the co-author of a number of controversial articles on climate change policy including 'Zen and the Art of Carbon Cycle Maintenance', 'Lifting the Taboo on Adaptation' and 'Time to Ditch Kyoto', all published in the journal Nature. Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor of Science and Civilization, Professorial Fellow of Keble College, and Director of the Institute for Science Innovation and Society Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

climate change | alumni | global warming | adaptation | kyoto protocol | carbon emissions | climate change | alumni | global warming | adaptation | kyoto protocol | carbon emissions | 2012-09-16

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.345 Automatic Speech Recognition (MIT) 6.345 Automatic Speech Recognition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. 6.345 introduces students to the rapidly developing field of automatic speech recognition. Its content is divided into three parts. Part I deals with background material in the acoustic theory of speech production, acoustic-phonetics, and signal representation. Part II describes algorithmic aspects of speech recognition systems including pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modelling, and language modelling techniques. Part III compares and contrasts the various approaches to speech recognition, and describes advanced techniques used for acoustic-phonetic modelling, robust speech recognition, speaker adaptation, processing paralinguistic information, speech understanding, and multimodal processing. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. 6.345 introduces students to the rapidly developing field of automatic speech recognition. Its content is divided into three parts. Part I deals with background material in the acoustic theory of speech production, acoustic-phonetics, and signal representation. Part II describes algorithmic aspects of speech recognition systems including pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modelling, and language modelling techniques. Part III compares and contrasts the various approaches to speech recognition, and describes advanced techniques used for acoustic-phonetic modelling, robust speech recognition, speaker adaptation, processing paralinguistic information, speech understanding, and multimodal processing.

Subjects

speech recognition | speech recognition | automatic speech recognition | automatic speech recognition | acoustic theory | acoustic theory | speech production | speech production | acoustic-phonetics | acoustic-phonetics | signal representation | signal representation | pattern classification | pattern classification | search algorithms | search algorithms | stochastic modelling | stochastic modelling | language modelling | language modelling | speaker adaptation | speaker adaptation | paralinguistic information | paralinguistic information | speech understanding | speech understanding | multimodal processing | multimodal processing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.23 Hydrofoils and Propellers (MIT) 2.23 Hydrofoils and Propellers (MIT)

Description

This course develops the theory and design of hydrofoil sections, including lifting and thickness problems for sub-cavitating sections, unsteady flow problems, and computer-aided design of low drag cavitation-free sections. It also covers lifting line and lifting surface theory with applications to hydrofoil craft, rudder, control surface, propeller and wind turbine rotor design. Other topics include computer-aided design of wake adapted propellers; steady and unsteady propeller thrust and torque; performance analysis and design of wind turbine rotors in steady and stochastic wind; and numerical principles of vortex lattice and lifting surface panel methods. Projects illustrate the development of computational methods for lifting, propeller and wind turbine flows, and use of state-of-the-a This course develops the theory and design of hydrofoil sections, including lifting and thickness problems for sub-cavitating sections, unsteady flow problems, and computer-aided design of low drag cavitation-free sections. It also covers lifting line and lifting surface theory with applications to hydrofoil craft, rudder, control surface, propeller and wind turbine rotor design. Other topics include computer-aided design of wake adapted propellers; steady and unsteady propeller thrust and torque; performance analysis and design of wind turbine rotors in steady and stochastic wind; and numerical principles of vortex lattice and lifting surface panel methods. Projects illustrate the development of computational methods for lifting, propeller and wind turbine flows, and use of state-of-the-a

Subjects

turbine | turbine | rotor | rotor | computer-aided design | computer-aided design | propulsion | propulsion | lifting line | lifting line | thrust | thrust | torque | torque | vortices | vortices | boundary layers | boundary layers | wake adaptation | wake adaptation | cavitation | cavitation | fluid flow | fluid flow | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | lifting surface panel method | lifting surface panel method | vortex lattice method | vortex lattice method | lifting flow | lifting flow

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.036 The Visual System (MIT) 9.036 The Visual System (MIT)

Description

This comprehensive course on the visual system is designed to ground future researchers in the field of visual science and to provide scientists with an excellent basis for using the visual system as a model in research. In this graduate seminar, anatomical, neurophysiological, imaging and behavioral research is examined in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how information is processed in the primate visual system. This comprehensive course on the visual system is designed to ground future researchers in the field of visual science and to provide scientists with an excellent basis for using the visual system as a model in research. In this graduate seminar, anatomical, neurophysiological, imaging and behavioral research is examined in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how information is processed in the primate visual system.

Subjects

anatomical | anatomical | neurophysiological | neurophysiological | imaging | imaging | behavior | behavior | functional | functional | structural organization | structural organization | visual scene | visual scene | processing | processing | visual system | visual system | color vision | color vision | adaptation | adaptation | eye movements | eye movements | visual analysis | visual analysis | motion perception | motion perception | depth perception | depth perception | pattern perception | pattern perception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.941 Urban Climate Adaptation (MIT) 11.941 Urban Climate Adaptation (MIT)

Description

"Designing a dream city is easy. Rebuilding a living one takes imagination."    -Jane JacobsThis course examines the challenges that cities will face and strategies they can use to prepare for the impacts of climate change. Particular attention will be paid to the presence of global disparities, the needs of vulnerable populations and resource constrained locales, and the ways in which local government and community-based activities can achieve equitable levels of climate-readiness.  "Designing a dream city is easy. Rebuilding a living one takes imagination."    -Jane JacobsThis course examines the challenges that cities will face and strategies they can use to prepare for the impacts of climate change. Particular attention will be paid to the presence of global disparities, the needs of vulnerable populations and resource constrained locales, and the ways in which local government and community-based activities can achieve equitable levels of climate-readiness. 

Subjects

climate change | climate change | urban | urban | urban vulnerability | urban vulnerability | adaptation | adaptation | climate | climate | urban planning | urban planning | environment | environment | resiliency | resiliency | city | city | community | community

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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